Texel x mule or lleyn x mule

Llmmm

Member
Have to get a couple of rams this year usually cross texel on mule to get replacements but was considering a lyen use charolais as terminal on these would the lyen cross be too prolific and what about lamb quality
 

Ysgythan

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Ammanford
The mule is a maternal ewe. If she’s not right for you there are other maternal ewes. It’s a job to beat the right Texel on the right Mule in the right system. Lleyn x Mule would be a shambles and you’d need something better shaped than a Charolais to save the next generation. The question for me is Texel x Mule or Texel x Lleyn. Charolais will do a better job on a Texel x ewe, whatever the choice of grandmother.
 

Nithsdale Farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
The mule is a maternal ewe. If she’s not right for you there are other maternal ewes. It’s a job to beat the right Texel on the right Mule in the right system. Lleyn x Mule would be a shambles and you’d need something better shaped than a Charolais to save the next generation. The question for me is Texel x Mule or Texel x Lleyn. Charolais will do a better job on a Texel x ewe, whatever the choice of grandmother.


Speaking from experience, a Lleyn ewe bred from a (Scotch) Mule is not a shambles. There isn't much difference between her and the Mule, in the first instance. The LleynX will leave slightly smarter (Texel) lambs than a Mule, I never tried any other breed rams.

Have to get a couple of rams this year usually cross texel on mule to get replacements but was considering a lyen use charolais as terminal on these would the lyen cross be too prolific and what about lamb quality

What do you want?

Your first instance you're talking of putting terminal to maternal, then using another terminal. The resulting fat lambs will be 3/4 terminal so could(?) be deemed to be of higher quality.

Your 2nd instance you're looking at maternal onto maternal then using a terminal. The lambs will be a touch plainer, but easier lambing with it. You'll also have higher lambing % in this system.
 

Llmmm

Member
Speaking from experience, a Lleyn ewe bred from a (Scotch) Mule is not a shambles. There isn't much difference between her and the Mule, in the first instance. The LleynX will leave slightly smarter (Texel) lambs than a Mule, I never tried any other breed rams.



What do you want?

Your first instance you're talking of putting terminal to maternal, then using another terminal. The resulting fat lambs will be 3/4 terminal so could(?) be deemed to be of higher quality.

Your 2nd instance you're looking at maternal onto maternal then using a terminal. The lambs will be a touch plainer, but easier lambing with it. You'll also have higher lambing % in this system.
2nd instance is what i would hope for if it would work just concerned of quality of lambs to sell also my mules scan 2 id be worried with lleyn would i end up with lots of triplets
 

Nithsdale Farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
2nd instance is what i would hope for if it would work just concerned of quality of lambs to sell also my mules scan 2 id be worried with lleyn would i end up with lots of triplets


Can't comment with Charollais, but the lambs were good when I used Texel. You're still 50% terminal onto 50% maternal - but that 50% is made up of 3 breeds and not 2. The right Lleyn has better carcase than a Mule so does bring something to the table, too.

I don't believe the Lleyn is any more prolific than the worst - or should that be best? Guess it depends how you look at it - Mules.
 

Guiggs

Member
Location
Leicestershire
From personal experience I'd say there's lleyn and there's lleyn!
My current lleyn tup throws great lambs, they are never going to be as good a carcass as a Texel cross for example but they really aren't far behind, some are better!
I've never put a lleyn to a mule although I have considered it but if I'd expect a less hungry more compact ewe that would cross well to most terminals and with a little common sense and some management at tupping I would not be overly concerned about too many triplets!
 

Gator

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Lancashire
Used to cross north country Cheviot Ram over the mule ewes, resulting in great ewes,, that's before I moved over to the dark side
I usually buy afew Beulah mules and tup them with the Cheviot tup, throw some nice ewe lambs.
20181101_095245.jpg
 

Ysgythan

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Ammanford
Speaking from experience, a Lleyn ewe bred from a (Scotch) Mule is not a shambles. There isn't much difference between her and the Mule, in the first instance. The LleynX will leave slightly smarter (Texel) lambs than a Mule, I never tried any other breed rams.

Yeah well a Scotch Mule was a shambles for us full stop as she’s just too breedy. Welsh mules work a lot better, presumably because we’re closer to the Beulah’s home range. @ford4000 has taken a different approach of Aberfield on Lleyn ewe. Unless you have a lot of Scotch Mules or are breeding them yourselves I’m still struggling with the theory of a second maternal cross.

I don’t doubt you had results by the way, but not everybody is you...
 

Nithsdale Farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Yeah well a Scotch Mule was a shambles for us full stop as she’s just too breedy. Welsh mules work a lot better, presumably because we’re closer to the Beulah’s home range. @ford4000 has taken a different approach of Aberfield on Lleyn ewe. Unless you have a lot of Scotch Mules or are breeding them yourselves I’m still struggling with the theory of a second maternal cross.

I don’t doubt you had results by the way, but not everybody is you...

I had Blackies and Mules... saw how much better the Lleyn was so used the Mules (because I had them) to breed into Lleyns. So I started off with 1st cross Lleyn from Mules then 3/4, 7/8 etc until 13 year later and some fast track breeding :whistle: I'm now pretty much pure.


Agree different types of Mules will give different experiences and results. I also agree the Scotch Mule is not a good sheep - in general - especially compared to what she was 20 years ago. But there are 1 or 2 good breeders still around.
 

Top cereal and oilseed growers honoured at the Yield Enhancement Network Awards 2021

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Despite an average growing year for most crops, many growers managed to go above and beyond their predicted max yields, with Lincolnshire grower Tim Lamyman taking the top spots for his wheat yields and his world record breaking winter barley yield.

The highest cereal and oilseed yields achieved at harvest 2021 were announced at this year’s Yield Enhancement Network (YEN) Awards on Wednesday 24th November at the Croptec Show. With award presentations by Tom Bradshaw, Vice President of NFU, 24 farms took home the evening’s top awards for highest yield and highest potential yield achieved for wheat, winter and spring barley, oats, and oilseed. The 2021 winners came from all corners of the UK, as well as from as far afield as Finland and New Zealand.

Familiar names from 2020 made the...
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