The benefit of rolling

Bramble

Member
Had the same this year in 2 fields, rained off while rolling (2 sets of rolls going). Noticeable difference for 3-4 weeks but you can’t see any difference now between the rolled/unrolled bit in either field.

It was all drilled with a Rapid so the wheels will have rolled it a bit anyway
 

Farma Parma

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Northumberlandia
Got rained off when rolling a field of newly drilled winter wheat and it never got finished. Took this 3 weeks later slugs have hammered it where it hadn’t been rolled. Won’t make that mistake again!

was that in OSR previously? i get little bother here after any other crop but OSR & any dry clods what a job. all rolled aswell
 
Got rained off when rolling a field of newly drilled winter wheat and it never got finished. Took this 3 weeks later slugs have hammered it where it hadn’t been rolled. Won’t make that mistake again!


If you think that looks bad for slugs, consider how effective any residual chemistry will have been and how uneven the weed germination will be in such conditions.
 

Flat 10

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Fen Edge
Had the same this year in 2 fields, rained off while rolling (2 sets of rolls going). Noticeable difference for 3-4 weeks but you can’t see any difference now between the rolled/unrolled bit in either field.

It was all drilled with a Rapid so the wheels will have rolled it a bit anyway
Yes. Surprised rapid didn’t firm it enough.
 

teslacoils

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
Nothing rolled here. Maybe should have done non ploughed wheat after grass as it's clearly a bit fluffy. But the rest was rolled by the mighty deluges we had in the week after.
 

Fish

Member
Location
North yorkshire
The only crop I bother to roll is osr, all others, for me, is simply a waste of time and energy and is just recreational.
I will quantify that statement, all soils on this farm contain almost no stones.
 

Wigeon

Member
Arable Farmer
One of the harder decisions I reckon. Strong land with shut loads of stones does definitely benefit. I've probably regretted not rolling more than I have rolling. Depends on the consolidation of the drill though, and something of a catch 22 in wet conditons- use the tine drill because it the one with the packer wont go, but then tine drill needs consolidation, which you cant then do. And then germination is pants and slugs have a party.

Moral of the story- always drill in perfect conditions and always roll.... oh, hang on...
 
I don't think enough rolling is done. Done right (and with a reasonable season in front of it) it works wonders.

I wish more people would roll their stubbles where they are harrowing or otherwise tilling them. Get a far better weed chit and it firms the surface up making it less hospitable for slugs.

Would do it after drilling for most crops where it was possible. Makes it harder for slugs and birds to get at the seed. Makes it better for soil acting chemistry. Evens up emergence.

It can be done in the spring I agree but not always- depends on the spring and your ground.
 

glasshouse

Member
Location
lothians
I don't think enough rolling is done. Done right (and with a reasonable season in front of it) it works wonders.

I wish more people would roll their stubbles where they are harrowing or otherwise tilling them. Get a far better weed chit and it firms the surface up making it less hospitable for slugs.

Would do it after drilling for most crops where it was possible. Makes it harder for slugs and birds to get at the seed. Makes it better for soil acting chemistry. Evens up emergence.

It can be done in the spring I agree but not always- depends on the spring and your ground.
Rolling makes it easier for weeds to grow too
And makes it harder to harrow them out
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

court-640x360.jpg
A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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