The benefit of rolling

Dan Attle

Member
I find rolling a sorry job some times your sorry you didn’t roll more other years sorry you rolled any this year rolled our blacker land germinated lovley , wish I rolled our heavy but potential rain on the way was focused on a getting more in and felt a bit spongy underneath and now with that wonderful thing of hindsight I wish I rolled it all
Equally few years ago rolled all my early drilled spring barley for it to then rain for 2 weeks solid 🤦🏻‍♂️
One day I’ll get it right 😂
 

CORK

Member
Stones & slugs are the main reason I roll.

Rolled wheat in the spring this year and it went grand. 6.75tn tractor with 650 tyres running at 10-12 psi.

Rolled most of the winter cereals in the autumn this year. Some pre emergence and some at 1 leaf.

Waiting till spring is fine if just worried about stones but slugs are a different story.
We got mullered by slugs in wheat after WOSR last year, complete carnage (seed hollowing. It wasn’t rolled as conditions didn’t seem good enough.
The wheat grew where the quad bike spreading pellets travelled.

I’ve had a few bad experiences with slugs after WOSR in the past two years, chastening experiences.

Have taken a new approach and it worked terrifically well this year. All WOSR stubble was disced (2” deep) in dry weather. First pass right after harvest and second 3 weeks later. No pellets needed.
I have started checking fields at night with a headlight to monitor for slug levels before and after planting.

Fingers crossed that I’ll be able to get rid of slug pressure before I plant anything.
Multiple applications of pellets turn in a big cost, additionally- the crop will have been damaged too, double whammy.

4844785E-1E19-4168-8743-5BEF44D0C7E7.jpeg
 

glasshouse

Member
Location
lothians
Stones & slugs are the main reason I roll.

Rolled wheat in the spring this year and it went grand. 6.75tn tractor with 650 tyres running at 10-12 psi.

Rolled most of the winter cereals in the autumn this year. Some pre emergence and some at 1 leaf.

Waiting till spring is fine if just worried about stones but slugs are a different story.
We got mullered by slugs in wheat after WOSR last year, complete carnage (seed hollowing. It wasn’t rolled as conditions didn’t seem good enough.
The wheat grew where the quad bike spreading pellets travelled.

I’ve had a few bad experiences with slugs after WOSR in the past two years, chastening experiences.

Have taken a new approach and it worked terrifically well this year. All WOSR stubble was disced (2” deep) in dry weather. First pass right after harvest and second 3 weeks later. No pellets needed.
I have started checking fields at night with a headlight to monitor for slug levels before and after planting.

Fingers crossed that I’ll be able to get rid of slug pressure before I plant anything.
Multiple applications of pellets turn in a big cost, additionally- the crop will have been damaged too, double whammy.

View attachment 1003760
Before the independence referendum in 2014, a local farmer cultivated a big NO in his rape stubble. A month or so later he ploughed and sowed wheat
The only part of the field that survived the slug attack was the NO sign.
 
Spring rolled wheat, which coincided with a late frost, looked nuked. Was a good two inches shorter. And a good five percent more grain yield. I love spring rolling if we get a dry enough day for it. And means combine can get the header right down.

Spring wheat being two inches shorter is a good thing. The stuff looks so bloody miserable and tiny when it first comes up but once it gets the sun on it's back it gets leggy as fudge in no time.
 

A1baz

Member
I must point out to the OP that the use of a plough and PH combi drill is not seen as PC at this point in time and that he must sell all his big tractors and cultivation kit and buy a £120,000 direct drill.
Ha, I wish we had some big tractors to sell! Nothing here above 120hp, I’ve only just managed to convince the old man to let me retire the Massey 30 behind a 7610! This is the first year using a combi 😂
 

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JCB launches Fastrac ‘iCon’

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Written by Charlotte Cunningham from CPM Magazine

JCB has launched new Fastrac 4000 and 8000 Series tractors with an all-new electronics infrastructure which is claimed to deliver higher levels of performance. According to JCB, the new Fastrac iCon operator environment has three key features: iConfigure – creating a bespoke control experience for every operator iConnect – integrating advanced precision agriculture technology iControl – redefining operation through new driveline software The 175hp to 348hp (133kW to 260kW) Fastracs feature the new iCon armrest console and touch-screen display to provide flexibility in operator allocation and operator information, as well as a new transmission control strategy to enhance operator comfort and powertrain efficiency, says the manufacturer...
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