The Fencing Picture Thread

Discussion in 'Pictures & Videos' started by Andy26, Feb 19, 2013.

  1. I do the ones immediately below and above the strut first then the rest are easy
     
  2. early riser

    early riser Member

    Location:
    Up North
    I'm about to fence a sleeper cow track - how far from edge of sleepers would you place posts to maximise width without cows walking on a strip of earth at the side - 0.5m?

    Previous tracks we've done I've put the posts at 1ft off edge of sleepers, but feel we could push this wider.

    TIA
     
  3. Big_Alan

    Big_Alan Member

    Location:
    South Lanarkshire
    E9FE0E1D-4604-40BA-AEDE-1BB0B01A6AC3.jpeg 5BF70E00-428D-4ED8-92C7-39E7113E915C.jpeg 9A352D8D-8755-44E0-9162-983B06CE17A1.jpeg 0971DBC9-5408-4415-A736-BFDBEB6BFFA2.jpeg 9B635C68-2099-4D07-A42C-243E97AEE681.jpeg 53EE557F-FAF9-41CA-B84F-ED29F1A5FA99.jpeg 7EFD340F-5BBD-4434-AA5C-F5BDDB9F5CB2.jpeg 4A2C8B95-EFB7-4A27-AD51-A176349402D8.jpeg CC406474-22AC-4651-A182-B6C22B7E1D7B.jpeg B5521DAC-F9BE-447D-B90C-EC964F593B0B.jpeg Been a busy spell at the fencing and here’s a few pics.
     
  4. pine_guy

    pine_guy Member

    Location:
    North Cumbria
  5. Ffermer Bach

    Ffermer Bach Member

  6. pine_guy

    pine_guy Member

    Location:
    North Cumbria
    square posts, I'm guessing doemstic job, or a carpark etc.
     
  7. tepapa

    tepapa Member

    Location:
    North Wales
    No it's a Scottish thing.
     
  8. pine_guy

    pine_guy Member

    Location:
    North Cumbria
    and on a better inspection, the first pictures are in insulation, so i am guessing a live top wire.
     
  9. Willie adie

    Willie adie Member

    Location:
    Aberdeenshire
    Centre line behind the flock is standard procedure for me I think it gives new more support against sheep.
    And as with line barbed or plain along top of the flock I've always done it and is commonplace up here.
    I've an issue with the lack of tieing off in one of the pics but apart from that no problem
     
  10. Big_Alan

    Big_Alan Member

    Location:
    South Lanarkshire
    As said above. I do it for the added strength and support against sheep. And it does seem to be a Scottish thing to do. In some of the pics the top wire is live yes. Seems to be asked for more often. Although makes jumping a fence trickier.
     
  11. Willie adie

    Willie adie Member

    Location:
    Aberdeenshire
    For all the price of plain wire i don't do it on garden fences but do it as standard on all stock fencing.
    Yes Ive heard its a scottish thing. Much like radisuers im led to believe they arent used much down south and tornado said to me that they sell 95% of them to scottish customers
     
  12. Dave6170

    Dave6170 Member

    Location:
    Watten, caithness
    What do they use instead of a radisuers?
     
  13. Hfd Cattle

    Hfd Cattle Member

    Location:
    Hereford
  14. Hfd Cattle

    Hfd Cattle Member

    Location:
    Hereford
    Fencing done for me by nb844.
     
  15. Hfd Cattle

    Hfd Cattle Member

    Location:
    Hereford
    IMG_1318.JPG Looking the other way !
     
    Bury the Trash and nb844 like this.
  16. Hfd Cattle

    Hfd Cattle Member

    Location:
    Hereford
    IMG_1319.JPG
     
    nb844 likes this.
  17. Hfd Cattle

    Hfd Cattle Member

    Location:
    Hereford
    One day I will learn how to put all the photos on in one go. !
     
  18. Alan88

    Alan88 Member

    Location:
    Northern Ireland
    How far apart should I space posts and strainers? Got just under 100m straight with a slight rise not quite in the middle next to a neighbour who always has hungry cattle
     
  19. DrDunc

    DrDunc Member

    Location:
    Dunsyre
    Just about far enough apart that the professional fencing contractor can reach them all easily to load onto their machine? :rolleyes:

    Seriously, it may only be 100m, bit if you're needing to ask how far apart to space the wood, you won't know how to tie off the ends, or pull the wire correctly tight?

    If it's hungry cattle on the other side, a poorly put up fence will last a few hours. Better to spend a few hundred quid and get the job done right imo
     
    tepapa, JohnD and blackieman83 like this.
  20. Davey

    Davey Member

    Location:
    Derbyshire
    Assuming its good flattish ground 12ft is fine, less if you need to cover obstacles.

    I've always found cattle and sheep are generally respectful of a solid fence (although it needs to stand up to being used as a scratch post) but if its tatty / loose etc they'll barge it down.

    Pigs on the other hand can be hard on fencing especially if its a small area (isolation pens etc) so better used as an outer line to electric
     

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