The NFU backs gene editing. Do you ?

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
How many growers will use some preharvest glyphosate this year to deal with secondary growths. This use could have been lost to the industry if some had had their way.
Unless your soil has stopped growing weeds there is going to be a need for some assistance from time to time.
I’m talking about not being completely beholden like the American farmers I met.
 

turbo

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
lincs
BT cotton aswell. Look into it, don’t just believe what bio-tech companies publish in the farming press.
I do look at other outlets other than the bio tec companies and having in the past had limited experience with the tec in on farm trails I find it sad that some still hold the blinkered views you express
 

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
I do look at other outlets other than the bio tec companies and having in the past had limited experience with the tec in on farm trails I find it sad that some still hold the blinkered views you express
I’m not blinkered, I used to be all for it.
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
So seeds never get into another field by means other than a drill?
Would the same not apply to hybrid barley contaminating the conventional barley that was someone was wanting to save for seed over the hedge? Or triticale from some of those expensive environmental mixes contaminating someone’s seed crop when pigeons have dropped grain?

Why is the argument any different for GM contamination?
 

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
Would the same not apply to hybrid barley contaminating the conventional barley that was someone was wanting to save for seed over the hedge? Or triticale from some of those expensive environmental mixes contaminating someone’s seed crop when pigeons have dropped grain?

Why is the argument any different for GM contamination?
Big growing markets for non gm. If you are growing for than and your neighbour contaminates your crop will he pay compensation?
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
Big growing markets for non gm. If you are growing for than and your neighbour contaminates your crop will he pay compensation?
Would my neighbour pay compensation if pigeons carried triticale from his HLS strips and contaminated crops I wanted to save, or sell come to that, as seed?
 

turbo

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
lincs
So seeds never get into another field by means other than a drill?
What are you waffling on about now , I have no say if a grower doesn’t bother controlling diseases that can be wind blown on to my crops so why should you stop me from using a perfectly safe way of production using gm
 

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
What are you waffling on about now , I have no say if a grower doesn’t bother controlling diseases that can be wind blown on to my crops so why should you stop me from using a perfectly safe way of production using gm
We’re not talking about some disease though.
 
The issue of retaining purity from neighbouring GM crops is a contentious issue. It remains to be seen how, (if they were approved for use in the UK) this issue would be dealt with. For starters, how would the industry determine if a crop is non-GM or not? What is the sampling tolerance? Does it even make any difference if a crop has managed to receive some GM pollen from next door or not?
 

Cheesehead

Member
So why do you want to continue this with GM which pushes reductionist agriculture?
All systems can be pushed the same way even in organic farming in the England you are reduced to using 1 of 4 certification bodies you are restricted on what pesticides can be used which then in itself if not used in conjunction with other means can lead to resistance. Saying that farms go to companies like Bayer to sort out their problems how is that any different than farms going to conventional seed houses to answer their problem in developing a new seed that shows resistance to a disease. How is it different than a farmer looking to a worker manufacturer to develop a new wormer because he has screwed up and rather than following advise has just used that wormer because it is the only one that worked and it was easier to just use that each time rather than using other methods of control and testing.


Big growing markets for non gm. If you are growing for than and your neighbour contaminates your crop will he pay compensation?
So you are saying that farms should go organic as neighbouring farms could contaminate their crops with sprays or cross pollination.

The only difference I can see between CRISPR and conventional breeding is one works more precise while the other is trial and error planting cross pollinated seeds until you find ones with the desired traits.

What confuses me the most though are the exceptions to the rules if they are bad then why do they still allow sweetcorn to be grown when it is the result of the atomic tests and mutagenesis, do we then ban the use of rooting compounds and grafting when it comes to breeding new varieties.

What do we do about the dwindling banana plantations due to the fungal disease do we consign them to the history books as they can not be bred by conventional mean?

I just believe people should have a choice.
 

Cheesehead

Member
I’m not blinkered, I used to be all for it.
You are aware that also takes into account all inputs not just gmo but non-gmo and organic or are you saying conventional and organic farms don't use any inputs or labour. They just farm like a politician (stick the seed in the ground and watch it grow.)

All the graph shows is the difference in the gross revenue and net farm income, I doubt it would look any different for the UK or the EU what with the rise in cost of fuel the rise in cost of machinery and labour.
 

turbo

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
lincs
Look it up. A market we could supply, rather than demanding gm and trying to compete with South America.
I have looked it up and it doesn’t seem to pay that well atm but if the market is better rewarding than growing gm I am in but it is not
 

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New ELM scheme must be flexible and have farming at its heart, says NFU

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Written by John Swire

The new Environmental Land Management Scheme (ELMS) must be flexible and have farming at its heart, the NFU said today, as the government consultation draws to a close.

The scheme is due to be rolled out in 2024, replacing the existing environmental schemes currently available under the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP).

Tom Bradshaw
Tom Bradshaw

NFU Vice President Tom Bradshaw said: “The consultation on the new ELMS has given us a great opportunity to get a range of views from our...
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