The NI/ROI Protocol

Ashtree

Member
Policing so called normal relatively cohesive societies, is challenging at best.
Policing societies with a significant tribal never the twain shall agree element, must be absolutely impossible.
 

The Agrarian

Member
Location
Co Antrim
Anywhere different races and cultures exist in ghettos produces similar results. That's not the point though, is it? The group either broke the guidelines, or it didn't? Am I right? There was no interaction with another ethnic group. It was an independently organised action.

What seems to be debated here is the response by the police, and whether they should have given the group a special free pass. But to give that special pass signals that
1. The group's gathering was more important than everyone else's.
2. The police are scared of them, and therefore won't react to other republican groups who try this.
3. The police can pick and choose which rules they enforce.
4. The police can pick and choose upon whom and where they enforce the law.

This is pretty worrying for law and order. In the past, republicans argued that they were not subject to the law, because it was policed mostly by protestants (even though it was dealt with in a reasonably even handed way, considering the tough circumstances). What's the excuse now though, when catholic membership of the police is at about a third, and very few of the police on the beat were in that job during the troubles?
 
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Mouser

Member
Location
near Belfast
Anywhere different races and cultures exist in ghettos produces similar results. That's not the point though, is it? The group either broke the guidelines, or it didn't? Am I right? There was no interaction with another ethnic group. It was an independently organised action.

What seems to be debated here is the response by the police, and whether they should have given the group a special free pass. But to give that special pass signals that
1. The group's gathering was more important than everyone else's.
2. The police are scared of them, and therefore won't react to other republican groups who try this.
3. The police can pick and choose which rules they enforce.
4. The police can pick and choose upon whom and where they enforce the law.

This is pretty worrying for law and order. In the past, republicans argued that they were not subject to the law, because it was policed mostly by protestants (even though it was dealt with in a reasonably even handed way, considering the tough circumstances). What's the excuse now though, when catholic membership of the police is at about a third, and very few of the police on the beat were in that job during the troubles?
It's not a problem, just media hype and moaning on both sides. Shinners have some neck moaning after the high profile funerals but that's no surprise!
 

Ashtree

Member
It's not a problem, just media hype and moaning on both sides. Shinners have some neck moaning after the high profile funerals but that's no surprise!
Don’t they have potholes and broadband coverage to keep the moan machine busy?
Our crowd down here, have a simple life really. No green or orange stuff, no flegs or emblems, no silly men with dark glasses and berets, no silly men banging drums, no Queen’s highway, no silly commemorations of freedom fighters. Easter Monday, Taoiseach gets to trot to the garden of remembrance, say a few words, lay a wreath, and go back to the office to do a bit of work.
Still though, they all find plenty to moan about.
 

Mouser

Member
Location
near Belfast
Don’t they have potholes and broadband coverage to keep the moan machine busy?
Our crowd down here, have a simple life really. No green or orange stuff, no flegs or emblems, no silly men with dark glasses and berets, no silly men banging drums, no Queen’s highway, no silly commemorations of freedom fighters. Easter Monday, Taoiseach gets to trot to the garden of remembrance, say a few words, lay a wreath, and go back to the office to do a bit of work.
Still though, they all find plenty to moan about.
We must be extra good moaners up here, you boys are slacking!
 

Wellytrack

Member
Don’t they have potholes and broadband coverage to keep the moan machine busy?
Our crowd down here, have a simple life really. No green or orange stuff, no flegs or emblems, no silly men with dark glasses and berets, no silly men banging drums, no Queen’s highway, no silly commemorations of freedom fighters. Easter Monday, Taoiseach gets to trot to the garden of remembrance, say a few words, lay a wreath, and go back to the office to do a bit of work.
Still though, they all find plenty to moan about.
Meanwhile the residents in the Border counties feel they are treated differently than the other provinces.

Particularly Donegal.
 

le bon paysan

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Limousin, France
I thought I was toId a month ago that the deaI was amazing, and that anyone saying that the deaI was a massive bIow to the UK was a traitor who didn't Iike the Supreme Leader. Now Boris is saying that he wiII break his own deaI. PreviousIy, he signed his 'oven ready' WA in December 2019 and made a u-turn on it in August 2020, i.e. 8 months Iater. This time, he made a u-turn within a month. At this rate, he wiII caII this Starmer's deaI by this time next month.
 

Thecub

Member
Is their any credible suggestions as to how we can manage a work around, commonly known as a fudge to sort the protocol?
As far as I can see the only way is some sort of high tech solution that doesn't mean physical checks. My other suggestion is a very strong push (legal case) to say that surely the good Friday agreement equally would outlaw a border east west as well as north south. This is surely the ethos of the good Friday agreement as I understand it.
 
Is their any credible suggestions as to how we can manage a work around, commonly known as a fudge to sort the protocol?
As far as I can see the only way is some sort of high tech solution that doesn't mean physical checks. My other suggestion is a very strong push (legal case) to say that surely the good Friday agreement equally would outlaw a border east west as well as north south. This is surely the ethos of the good Friday agreement as I understand it.
I'm assuming those who drew the agreement weren't reckoning on Westminster being so obtuse.
Good old Boris
 

le bon paysan

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Limousin, France
I'm assuming those who drew the agreement weren't reckoning on Westminster being so obtuse.
Good old Boris
Gove demands the EU refine the protocol after trust in the EU was eroded😂
A further example of complete hypocrisy from Gove and his chums. It was the UK government that first threatened to break the NI agreement at the end of last year, when the Internal Market Bill was published. As the Minister for Northern Ireland (Brandon Lewis) famously admitted in the House at the time: "Yes, this does break international law in a very specific and limited way."
The UK top legal civil servant felt obliged to resign the following day in the face of such an outrageous proposal to breach an international agreement!
 

Ashtree

Member
The original border was around the coastline of the island of Ireland, taking a couple of deviations to encompass the off shore islands. Oh, including Rockall! Just sayin....
 

Thecub

Member
This shouldn't be framed as green or orange or DUP v SF this is about getting a workable solution. As with anything in NI nobody can be seen to win and anything that appears as such will definitely not happen. As I said earlier I don't know how an east West border can be allowed under the good Friday agreement can this not be challenged in court?? No borders means we all win in Northern Ireland and nobody threatens violence.
 

Wellytrack

Member
This shouldn't be framed as green or orange or DUP v SF this is about getting a workable solution. As with anything in NI nobody can be seen to win and anything that appears as such will definitely not happen. As I said earlier I don't know how an east West border can be allowed under the good Friday agreement can this not be challenged in court?? No borders means we all win in Northern Ireland and nobody threatens violence.
East/West border?
 

Could a ‘Meat Tax’ be on the cards in the UK?

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Written by Richard Halleron from Agriland

The latest machination coming from the so-called ‘opinion formers’, who seem to have the ear of government advisors in London, is the introduction of a ‘Meat Tax’ at consumer level.

This approach, it is argued, would have the combined impact of reducing meat consumption levels (I can really see the health benefits coming through now), while also helping to reduce the overall carbon footprint of production agriculture.

What absolute drivel! In my opinion, none of this makes sense at any level. This is a scurrilous and unfounded attack on livestock farming in this part of the world.

Yet, it has to be taken seriously. I make this point because economists at Rothamsted Research have already crunched the numbers where the introduction of a ‘UK...
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