Thingamajig which turns cordless tools into corded tools, would you buy it?

If there was a thingamajig which turns cordless tools into corded tools, would you buy it?

  • No

    Votes: 22 71.0%
  • Yes

    Votes: 9 29.0%
  • Maybe, if ... (place comment)

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    31
  • Poll closed .

Turnip

Member
So I am helping someone get a degree and one task they have is come up with a product idea and write a business case around it. Question to the community here is would you buy this? His product is a device which has the same form factor as a battery for a cordless tool but enables it to be fed from mains voltage, either 230V or 110V. The thinking behind it is that in the building trade there are occasions where you are not allowed to use mains powered tools, occasions where you can only use 110V tools instead of 230V, etc. And having for instance three mitre saws, one battery, one 230V and one 110V is just expensive. First indications of uses would be for power hungry devices like mitre saws, angle grinders, etc which would also benefit from the continuous power supply instead of degrading battery.

If there was a device which would allow you to use your cordless tools as mains powered tools would you buy it?

For me the answer is yes as it would allow me to use my tools in the workshop hooked up to mains power so I have maximum power, and use the same tools out in the fields if I need to.

Its a bit like this Dewalt device but generic to be used in more tools.
 

Muddyroads

Member
NFFN Member
Location
Exeter, Devon
Much the same as some electric fence energisers presumably.
Yes. Just bought a new set of sheep clippers for dagging etc. Had a 12 volt set but rarely used it away from the mains. Have now bought a mains set but would have preferred one which could have had either input method.
 

TheTallGuy

Member
Location
Cambridgeshire
You wouldn't need 3 sets of tools as you'd have battery & 110V and then have a tool transformer for where only 230V is available. Would I use one? I doubt it because if power is available it can be charging batteries rather than direct powering the tool. Modern cordless tools are pretty good & so the need for mains powered ones is shrinking.
 

Goweresque

Member
Location
North Wilts
If they did conversions for old tools where the batteries have died and its not worth getting new ones then yes, I'd certainly buy such an item (assuming the price is not stupid, ie more than a new equivalent tool). There must be millions of old bits of cordless kit sat out there not being used because the batteries are unobtainable or uneconomic to obtain.
 

dave mountain

Member
Livestock Farmer
realistically not many (if anyone) would buy it.

if you have cordless tools, youve paid the extra for that convenience, so why pay more to forfeit it some times?
non starter for impact wrenches, drivers, drills, sds drills etc
for mitre saws, youd probably have a big 12" slide saw in the workshop and a little cordless mitre saw for taking up on scaffold etc, not really the same tool.
for skilsaw, my battery one is more powerful than any corded and i would never want to plug it in anyway as the leads get in the way
for grinders, if your in a fab shop or on a big job you use mains as they are cheaper and higher performance. if not you use cordless for convenience but they are more expensive before you buy an adapter and i would die of boredom doing fab work with a cordless grinder.
there isnt that many other tools that use enough power to consider it, especially as 9ah batteries are commonplace now.
 

goodevans

Member
I suggested this on here a few years ago and got laughed at and also looked into it with a very clever engineer but nothing came of it , I was told at the time it was better to have an extra battery and a fast charger if you were close to 240v.it would be a simple thing to do I would imagine , transformer to a fake battery
 

Bury the Trash

Member
Mixed Farmer
If they did conversions for old tools where the batteries have died and its not worth getting new ones then yes, I'd certainly buy such an item (assuming the price is not stupid, ie more than a new equivalent tool). There must be millions of old bits of cordless kit sat out there not being used because the batteries are unobtainable or uneconomic to obtain.
long time ago i converted an 18v cheap cordless drill to corded 12v for lead acid tractor battery use so i could use it fencing instead of throw it away because the batteries died and were not made anymore but the motor was still good .
couple of croc clips and long wires soldered into the right place and all taped up .
it worked but not quite so vigorously as if it had been 18v.
satisfied my need to not chuck anything away as well ...:sneaky:

common 36v stuff could be used in the same manner i guess by connecting 3 common or garden 12v lead acid batteries together if you really wanted too
 

Andrew

Member
Location
Huntingdon, UK
Personally the convenience of cordless and not getting cables tangled it so much easier and safer. You only need one tool of every type, so you can have a lot of batteries.
Most tradesmen will already have a charger and 240/110v inverter and a selection of batteries.

More viable would be an adaptor set so you could put milwaukee batteries on makita and vice versa.
 

Monty

Member
I think there would be a small market for them on older tools as back ups for when the batteries inevitably die on you. It would need to be lightweight, ideally with a decent length cable 10m or so to reduce the need for annoying extension leads and reasonably cheap. If it made the tool more powerful than when running on the battery, even better.
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

  • 156
  • 0
Written by William Kellett from Agriland

Farm-safety-640x360.png
The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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