Thoughts on these trailers please!

We are after a small trailer that can double up as a livestock trailer and a multi-use trailer for carting bits and bobs around. We have found the following, there seem to be a few different manufacturers but what are people's views? Are they worth the money? Are they worth having another trailer sat about? Do they last or will they likely fall apart after a year?
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Thanks in advance!
 
I have a CLH one identical to the picture above and it's a great bit of kit. It lives attached to my Passat February to April when we are calving on one farm and rearing calves on another. It tows very smoothly and it's easy to forget it's there.

I would say it's definitely more of an on road trailer than a field trailer though.
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
I have a CLH one, as above, but it's useless on the quad. I have a (now knackered) jockey wheel on it, that is hardly clear of the ground when pulled right up as the angle is all wrong when hooked on the quad.

It's great little road trailer, but I have a cheap & cheerful quad trailer on balloon tyres from Rob Astley for bombing around the farm.
 
Thanks for the replies. We wanted it to be road legal for taking a handful of lambs to the abbatoir or carting tups around, but also be able to use it behind the pickup for hauling equipment (weigh crate and hurdles) or ewes and lambs at lambing time across fields.

Currently have to take the 10ft stock trailer up the field to move the weigh crate, either that or take canopy off the pickup and lift it up :eek:
 

Poorbuthappy

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Devon
Thanks for the replies. We wanted it to be road legal for taking a handful of lambs to the abbatoir or carting tups around, but also be able to use it behind the pickup for hauling equipment (weigh crate and hurdles) or ewes and lambs at lambing time across fields.

Currently have to take the 10ft stock trailer up the field to move the weigh crate, either that or take canopy off the pickup and lift it up :eek:
Mine used to haul all ewes and lambs out during lambing behind quad. Yes they're not like a proper atv trailer in fields esp in winter, but no problem in sensible conditions.
 

TL.

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Wales
Had a 5 x 3 CLH bike trailer for years and got a 7 x4 CLH as in the picture with hinged lid for the bike to go in.
Take lid off to haul ewes and lambs out with the bike or truck and fetch dumpy bags of feed with it. The little door in the ramp is brilliant.
First thing I did was take the jockey wheel off it. They are strong trailers but don't go dropping mineral buckets over the sides onto the floor or you'll end up with a few dents :oops:
 

GTB

Never Forgotten
Honorary Member
I have a CLH one, as above, but it's useless on the quad. I have a (now knackered) jockey wheel on it, that is hardly clear of the ground when pulled right up as the angle is all wrong when hooked on the quad.

It's great little road trailer, but I have a cheap & cheerful quad trailer on balloon tyres from Rob Astley for bombing around the farm.
This ^^^
They're damn good little trailers for road use and will last for many years. Many manufacturers make them to a very similar design. As above we have a smaller, lighter trailer for towing behind the quad. With no light cluster, seven pin plug or jockey wheel to worry about...
 

TL.

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Wales
The one thing that drives me mad about our little bike trailer is the low sides. You make a good job of catching a ewe, chuck her in the trailer and off to go only to look round and the fecking thing has jumped out!!
 

Al R

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
West Wales
Had a 5 x 3 CLH bike trailer for years and got a 7 x4 CLH as in the picture with hinged lid for the bike to go in.
Take lid off to haul ewes and lambs out with the bike or truck and fetch dumpy bags of feed with it. The little door in the ramp is brilliant.
First thing I did was take the jockey wheel off it. They are strong trailers but don't go dropping mineral buckets over the sides onto the floor or you'll end up with a few dents :oops:

We've got 2 un named trailers that dalton were selling at the time. 1 is 1999 5x4, the other is 2004 5x3. Both still in brilliant condition with no problems.
We bought a 7x4 CLH in 2009 and bent the floor the first time we loaded it full of ewes, the back door latches were both gone within days. Wheel bearings have been done 3 times in it. Yes it carries more sheep but it hasn't done 1/10th of the work the 2 smaller ones do. A good trailer but I think I'd be tempted on spending a little more and getting a Nugent next time.
 

elmo

Member
Location
West Wales
I have an 8' version of these which is used often. Very good on the road, probably not the best in the field due to the tyres i suppose. The only negatives i have with mine would be the livestock gates i had fitted to it come off all the time. Probably just need to get the sledge hammer to close the hinges up a bit. I've also probably over-loaded it quite a few times which now means that the tyres wear on the inside as i found out last week when i had a blow out! (was down to the wire on the inside but plenty of tread on the visible side). Overall a very good trailer if used as it should!
 

DaveJ

Member
Location
Montgomeryshire
We had a Rob Astley one for years. Still going strong in the hands of a former workman who bought it from me. Allegedly will cope with regular use somewhat in excess of 750kg gross, but of course I couldn't possibly comment. His current models have the option of a gas strut lifting roof. The CLH looks fine, but Rob is local so I never bothered trying elsewhere.
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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