Timber size

Discussion in 'Buildings & Infrastructure' started by grass man, Mar 12, 2019.

  1. grass man

    grass man Member

    What size timber is required for a fibre cement roof on 6 meter bays?
     
  2. rob1

    rob1 Member

    Location:
    wiltshire
    Nine by three
     
  3. aangus

    aangus Member

    Location:
    cumbria
    9'' x 3''
     
    grass man likes this.
  4. David.

    David. Member

    Location:
    J11 M40
    And put 4ft of angle on the rafters as a cleat to reduce unsupported span to 16ft.
     
    andrew830 and General-Lee like this.
  5. mx110

    mx110 Member

    Location:
    cumbria
    12x3 if you dont want them sagging
     
  6. David.

    David. Member

    Location:
    J11 M40
    Trouble is the heavier section you go to overcome sagging, the wet timber and the extra weight defeat you. 6m is too wide for today's timber.
    Crap timber is the problem, and I dont know where to buy good. Only answer is to have a good relationship with local sawmill that will allow you to pick them out.
     
    Lazy Eric and mx110 like this.
  7. aangus

    aangus Member

    Location:
    cumbria
    Better to go with 15' bays
     
    Lazy Eric and David. like this.
  8. rob1

    rob1 Member

    Location:
    wiltshire
    chap I get my seds fromsays it as cheap now to use steel , and they come ready drilled and are straight
     
    BobGreen likes this.
  9. aangus

    aangus Member

    Location:
    cumbria
    I don't like steel for a livestock building
     
  10. rob1

    rob1 Member

    Location:
    wiltshire
    we have one thats forty years old with steel thats ok so far and the new ones are better, but I get your point
     
    aangus likes this.
  11. egbert

    egbert Member

    I don't want to admit it, but I've done a couple of cattle buildings in 10' bays.
    Total volume of timber was the same, but we cut all the (4x2) purlins from the co-product when cutting posts and rafters, so used less logs and had less waste.
    Hardly dedicated a log to purlins.

    To avoid using too many posts (construction was raised feed passage through middle) we sat rafters on gurt 20' beams running lengthways.
     
    Sharpy likes this.
  12. grass man

    grass man Member

    I have a shed ordered with 20 ft bays, 9×3 timbers and box profile anti condensation non drip cladding. It's a general purpose machinery shed / workshop. My shed erector now suggested that the last few sheds he put up with that cladding do not please him. He says where the sheets overlap there is a raised lip because the fleece pushes it up and also the fleece runs right to the end of the sheet and over the spouting and he thinks that if it splashes up from the spouting that it may get absorbed back up the underside of the cladding a little. This is the reason for the original question. Any advice or opinions?
     
  13. Tell your shed builder that he needs to scorch the end 3 inches of the top sheet at the lap and at the eaves to stop this happening.
     
  14. aangus

    aangus Member

    Location:
    cumbria
    Cancel shed and go for 15' bays with cement fibre roof nice and quiet on a rainy day
     
    Forever Fendt, David. and Gator like this.
  15. grass man

    grass man Member

    My shed builder and supplier are different people. I want to stick with 20 ft bays because the doors are in the side and I want side doors. How do you scorch, is this during the manufacturing or erection? Tia
     
  16. mo!

    mo! Member

    Location:
    York
    If it's a workshop go for insulated sheets.
     
  17. On site before erection, basically burn the fleece off with a blow torch or similar. Simple and very common technique.
     

Share This Page