Tine drill pros and cons

Mr Tree

Member
Location
Sth Yorkshire
Hi Everyone,

we’ve been using various disc/cultivator drills for decades now along the lines of Rapids and Moore tandem etc.

I’ve demo a KV tine drill this spring as I’m looking at a simpler cheaper system to replace my 20 year old disc drill

Land type- clay loams

Anyone else run a simple tine drill on their farms as the main /only drill?

Thanks
 

spikeislander

Member
Location
bedfordshire
Hi there we run both , vaderstad obviously better output and will make a better seed bed ( we do some contracting so we don’t always know what will meet us as far as previous cultivation quality so vaderstad will make something), vaderstad nicer to use re box etc.
I’d always take vaderstad if conditions allowed and never really fallen in love with the kv tine drill but it has its place and I’ve drilled the whole farm with it in the wet autumns and it gives you the chance to risk waiting late for bg.
Always use kv for pulses as I think the lifting action is beneficial.
Kv much cheaper to run and easier to work on .
In short I have both and will lean towards the vaderstad but if I could only have one drill , the way things are going with the climate and having to drill late , I suspect I would have to take the kv tine drill as it’s a safer option to guarantee getting drilled up.
 

welger

Member
Location
derbyshire
Hi Everyone,

we’ve been using various disc/cultivator drills for decades now along the lines of Rapids and Moore tandem etc.

I’ve demo a KV tine drill this spring as I’m looking at a simpler cheaper system to replace my 20 year old disc drill

Land type- clay loams

Anyone else run a simple tine drill on their farms as the main /only drill?

Thanks
Run a sola krm got the spring tines in front of the tine coulter- we don’t do that much drilling but we are pleased with it
 

Zippy768

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Dorset/Wilts
We run a KV tine drill as our sole drill.
2 years with it now.

Will always put seed well into the ground, even in awful seed beds.
Seed depth accuracy isn't its strong point, but everything comes up eventually.

One word to describe it - Rudimentary
Which fits into our way of working.
No bearings and few electrics (on accord system - which felt like stepping back in time when started using it).

Could change all wearing parts in under an hour with a windy gun.

Ours is 4.8m with 4 rows of tines which is needed in some trashy stubbles.
10km no problem on good ground and if its smooth going.

Can't say I'm in love with ours though.
Still waiting for the drill that I can get to the field and drill straight away.......without needing an engineering degree to set the dam thing up!

Also hydraulic fan is a MUST.
 

Gone Shooting

Member
Location
hereford
Run a Horsch pronto and love it here - had both Weaving tine and sabre drills in the past and found the sabre better for placement and did not bring all the clods back up after power harrowing.
 

Flat 10

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Fen Edge
We run a KV tine drill as our sole drill.
2 years with it now.

Will always put seed well into the ground, even in awful seed beds.
Seed depth accuracy isn't its strong point, but everything comes up eventually.

One word to describe it - Rudimentary
Which fits into our way of working.
No bearings and few electrics (on accord system - which felt like stepping back in time when started using it).

Could change all wearing parts in under an hour with a windy gun.

Ours is 4.8m with 4 rows of tines which is needed in some trashy stubbles.
10km no problem on good ground and if its smooth going.

Can't say I'm in love with ours though.
Still waiting for the drill that I can get to the field and drill straight away.......without needing an engineering degree to set the dam thing up!

Also hydraulic fan is a MUST.
What is the big advantage of a hydraulic fan?
 

Andy26

Moderator
Arable Farmer
Location
Northants
What is the big advantage of a hydraulic fan?
On early KV tine drills if you adjust the drilling depth to put in beans say at 4" the wheel fouls on the PTO guard. When drilling cereals in tricky conditions soil from the tyres rubs against the PTO guard.
Also when picking up at headlines can lift the drill to full height with a hydraulic fan, obviously cannot do this with a PTO due to the angle will damage the shaft and cause vibrations.

And you can run at much lower tractor RPM as tine drills take little pulling.
 

idle git

Member
Mixed Farmer
Hi there we run both , vaderstad obviously better output and will make a better seed bed ( we do some contracting so we don’t always know what will meet us as far as previous cultivation quality so vaderstad will make something), vaderstad nicer to use re box etc.
I’d always take vaderstad if conditions allowed and never really fallen in love with the kv tine drill but it has its place and I’ve drilled the whole farm with it in the wet autumns and it gives you the chance to risk waiting late for bg.
Always use kv for pulses as I think the lifting action is beneficial.
Kv much cheaper to run and easier to work on .
In short I have both and will lean towards the vaderstad but if I could only have one drill , the way things are going with the climate and having to drill late , I suspect I would have to take the kv tine drill as it’s a safer option to guarantee getting drilled up.
Totally agree with you apart from the fact that I don't know if I could only work with just a tine drill,
This year was to wet for us to use Cambridge rolls and hells bells don't tine drills find the clods in a seed bed🙄 , if it's difficult drilling then we have been drilling insides of fields with rapid and then putting headlands in with weaving but to be honest I've found out that if generally it's to wet for a rapid then it's to wet for most drills , DD not included in this comment

Edit if it's to wet to roll behind a tine drill then we have had serious pre em damage in unconsolidated seedbeds
 

l'ordinary bonville

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
N Yorks
I run a Dale tine drill as my only drill, mainly direct onto stubbles. It does some cultivated ground both non inversion and ploughed. It works best onto untouched stubbles but fine for everything.

Very simple drill. It replaced a Vaderstad rapid that did the job at the time but was more maintenance hungry in terms of time and parts. I run an 8m Dale on 240hp at 8-9km/hr compared to the 4m vaddy at 14-16km/hr. Similar workrate but much lower fuel usage on the dale
 

spikeislander

Member
Location
bedfordshire
Totally agree with you apart from the fact that I don't know if I could only work with just a tine drill,
This year was to wet for us to use Cambridge rolls and hells bells don't tine drills find the clods in a seed bed🙄 , if it's difficult drilling then we have been drilling insides of fields with rapid and then putting headlands in with weaving but to be honest I've found out that if generally it's to wet for a rapid then it's to wet for most drills , DD not included in this comment

Edit if it's to wet to roll behind a tine drill then we have had serious pre em damage in unconsolidated seedbeds
I’ve got a bucket full of swept back tines if anyone interested , they came on it and not done much , I changed to a standard kkk type as when wet we wanted the lifting effect.
Off a 6m , but yes you are right if a dry seedbed they will roll out clods pretty well , that’s the trade off I suppose
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

court-640x360.jpg
A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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