Tine drill solutions?

Badshot

Member
Location
Kent
I’m assuming you have trouble with penetration with the ts ?
Not if the ground is soft enough. But it's very hard on the springs, I was breaking a lot, and at circa £45+ each it soon adds up.
Unfortunately to add a leaf meant buying complete springs and taking apart as individual leaves aren't available.
I'm on heavy clay.
 

Badshot

Member
Location
Kent
Are you busting most springs behind the wheels on the tractor, or no particular place?
It was all over, didn't break any or very few for a year or two, then as they got weaker I started breaking a lot, something like 20 on 500 acres.
Since adding a leaf I've broken very few.
 
120 to 240 hp. 5k to 20k . Up to 600ac

IMG_0512.jpg
 

JCfarmer

Member
Location
warks
Hi Alastair,

We used a Vaddy Marathon tungsten tipped 25 type point [ Pan anglia version]with a new type cast Kuhn Megant coulter behind. These coulters were modified with a new tube welded in to match the KV seed tube diameter,and Weaving air bleeds were fitted to the bottom of the seed tube to bridge the gap occupied by the longer original KV coulters, and to help coulters breathe better when drilling deep. So far we have drilled wheat barley borage and a trial area of beans with very good results.

The drill can be returned to standard spec if required, but can see no advantage of doing so.The Vaddy type points are 25mm wide rather than than the standard 40mm so penetration better with less disturbance, better depth potential for drilling beans and hopefully much less faffing around changing points in future!

Generally we have just used the Claydon Terrastar or a Knight press in front on our clays, but it works well on ploughed ground too. I think kinder soils would be DD , able if sufficient tilth present and ground conditions not rock hard.
I estimate it cost around £40 per leg including bolts etc to make a very worthwhile improvement. [IMO]

OK its not a Claydon, Dale or T Sem, but you can pull 6m with 150hp, no sweat.
I was looking at doing something similar on our kuhn megant, we have the cast coulters like you've put on your ts. They are not standard on the kuhn but our megant came with them, only know this after ordering a new set of points and bolts, the bolts were'nt long enough initally. Do you find them low disturbance enough, I was looking at adapting a sabre point to fit.
 

Andrew K

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Essex
I was looking at doing something similar on our kuhn megant, we have the cast coulters like you've put on your ts. They are not standard on the kuhn but our megant came with them, only know this after ordering a new set of points and bolts, the bolts were'nt long enough initally. Do you find them low disturbance enough, I was looking at adapting a sabre point to fit.
The sabre point is a bit narrower I think, but i find the Vaddy point a decent compromise esp if you need a wider slot for large winter beans etc.Also bear in mind if you do need to cultivate the seedbed a bit the narrower tine is less effective.
You might try asking @warksfarmer how he gets on with their Weaving ST machine?
 

Hereward

Member
Location
Peterborough
Hi Alastair,

We used a Vaddy Marathon tungsten tipped 25 type point [ Pan anglia version]with a new type cast Kuhn Megant coulter behind. These coulters were modified with a new tube welded in to match the KV seed tube diameter,and Weaving air bleeds were fitted to the bottom of the seed tube to bridge the gap occupied by the longer original KV coulters, and to help coulters breathe better when drilling deep. So far we have drilled wheat barley borage and a trial area of beans with very good results.

The drill can be returned to standard spec if required, but can see no advantage of doing so.The Vaddy type points are 25mm wide rather than than the standard 40mm so penetration better with less disturbance, better depth potential for drilling beans and hopefully much less faffing around changing points in future!

Generally we have just used the Claydon Terrastar or a Knight press in front on our clays, but it works well on ploughed ground too. I think kinder soils would be DD , able if sufficient tilth present and ground conditions not rock hard.
I estimate it cost around £40 per leg including bolts etc to make a very worthwhile improvement. [IMO]

OK its not a Claydon, Dale or T Sem, but you can pull 6m with 150hp, no sweat.
@Andrew K how are you getting on with your modified coulters on your KV TS?

Reading some old posts it seems you've previously strip tilled with a Claydon and now shallow till then drill with the KV TS?
 

Andrew K

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Essex
We find moving the top inch or so of soil is giving us a better chit of BG as well as providing a better tilth for the drill to operate with. The drill is lower disturbance at drilling and the points maintain their profile much better.Its no direct drill for all conditions but gets us what we want.
The cost is not to be sniffed at , but I dont think we will have to change points for a very long time as they have tungsten carbide tips.
 

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