Today at work

Dave6170

Member
View attachment 891096

As an offshoot of @Richy12 s "Badly behaved Dairy" bull thread, Got @cull cows to loaden this bloody idiot for slaughter. (Thanks.:cool:)
He was supposed to be our new stock bull, but he's been here just over 3 weeks, and he's a bloody nut job, so no way he's fit to breed off.:banghead::mad:
I don't fancy getting lamed, it's just not worth it, so looking at taking quite a ££ hit, but better that than a ride in an Ambulance.
Surely the breeder you bought him from knew he was bad?
 

Purli R

Member
Surely the breeder you bought him from knew he was bad?
I think he knows he was a pillock, but managed to stay on top of him, purely because the bull wouldn't have entirely flipped because he was "at home." I've been doing this breeding bull job for 30 years and he is the first bull I just would not go in the same pen as.
A sound and balanced bull may have been a bit narked for possibly a day or so,after travelling, but 3 weeks????? He's havin' a laff!
 

Dave6170

Member
I think he knows he was a pillock, but managed to stay on top of him, purely because the bull wouldn't have entirely flipped because he was "at home." I've been doing this breeding bull job for 30 years and he is the first bull I just would not go in the same pen as.
A sound and balanced bull may have been a bit narked for possibly a day or so,after travelling, but 3 weeks????? He's havin' a laff!
Shame he looks like a nice bull. As you say not worth it though.
 

Pan mixer

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Near Colchester
Still going. Last bit I can cut before July, I think that it will need some nice weather.

DSC_0126.JPG


Surprisingly dusty though when I tedded it an hour or two later. By then though the cracked ribs that I gained this morning loading cattle really began to pinch a bit so I couldn't turn round to take a picture. I have every sympathy with the @Purli R above about the mad bull, we have been clearing out some mental issues in our cows that have developed over the years and these were some of the last to go.

DSC_0127.JPG
 
Out of interest, do you struggle to find people to shoot them? Is the poison a case of time saving or whats the reason behind your preference for using it as opposed to trapping/shooting?
dont want people on the place shooting them.
One of the issues with pigs is they attract pig chasers / poachers / trespassers



the only truly effective way to shoot them is with professionals in a helicopter over a number of properties, but that obviously is very expensive & takes a bit of organising - shooters on the ground don’t the same sort of clearance rates
We are talking elimination - not recreational hunting

trapping can be very effective & I have done that in the past, however the numbers have really taken off, so the idea is a baiting campaign, followed up by trapping to keep an eye on the population

the baiting / poison is all under the supervision & control of a government agency
 
Last edited:
dont want people on the place shooting them.
One of the issues with pigs is they attract pig chasers / poachers / trespassers



the only truly effective way to shoot them is with professionals in a helicopter over a number of properties, but that obviously is very expensive & takes a bit of organising - shooters on the ground don’t the same sort of clearance rates
We are talking elimination - not recreational hunting

trapping can be very effective & I have done that in the past, however the numbers have really taken off, so the idea is a baiting campaign, followed up by trapping to keep an eye on the population

the baiting / poison is all under the supervision & control of a government agency
Fair enough! I hate the thought of poisoning that's all 🙄
 

Flat 10

Member
Location
Fen Edge
dont want people on the place shooting them.
One of the issues with pigs is they attract pig chasers / poachers / trespassers



the only truly effective way to shoot them is with professionals in a helicopter over a number of properties, but that obviously is very expensive & takes a bit of organising - shooters on the ground don’t the same sort of clearance rates
We are talking elimination - not recreational hunting

trapping can be very effective & I have done that in the past, however the numbers have really taken off, so the idea is a baiting campaign, followed up by trapping to keep an eye on the population

the baiting / poison is all under the supervision & control of a government agency
Seems a bit out of kilter with your world view...... I think there’s a few in the UK who would like the same approach with badgers....
 
It’s an International Acco, C1800 ( I think that’s the model ) so yes, North American, but they were assembled locally, in Victoria I think.

lots ofNorth American trucks here, but right hand drive
affectionately known as “butterboxes” for some reason, maybe the body shape ?
they were very common here in the day, came in a wide variety of weights & engine styles

edit - I see @cows sh#t me to tears beat me to it:ROFLMAO:
Farmer I worked for in Queensland about thirty years ago had an acco similar to that,also a dodge with a v8 petrol engine.think there was also an old Bedford made into a field bin type thing with an auger to empty it
 
Seems a bit out of kilter with your world view...... I think there’s a few in the UK who would like the same approach with badgers....
not at all - feral pigs are an introduced animal that pose a genuine environmental & bio security risk & as landowners it is our legal responsibility to control them.
Same as foxes, rabbits, feral cats, wild dogs etc. All of which are also poisoned / baited on public lands, National Parks, State Forests etc
 
Last edited:

David 52

Member
It’s an International Acco, C1800 ( I think that’s the model ) so yes, North American, but they were assembled locally, in Victoria I think.

lots ofNorth American trucks here, but right hand drive
affectionately known as “butterboxes” for some reason, maybe the body shape ?
they were very common here in the day, came in a wide variety of weights & engine styles

edit - I see @cows sh#t me to tears beat me to it:ROFLMAO:
I always understood that IH ACCO trucks were designed and made in Australia only.

Wikkipedia says;

ACCO[edit]
The Australian designed and built International Australian A-line Cab Over (AACO) was first produced in the late 1960s and later in 1972 the Australian C-line Cab Over (ACCO) . The ACCO is a cab over engine type truck and has been offered in 4x2, 4x4, 6x2, 6x4, 8x4, and 10x4 configurations. Engines used have been Cummins, Caterpillar, Detroit Diesel, Perkins, Neuss or GMC with Road-Ranger or Allison transmissions and Rockwell differentials. The ACCO range were built to order, serving private operators, fire departments, military services, and municipal departments across Australia and New Zealand. The ACCO became the most popular product of International Harvester in Australia. The ACCO continues to be manufactured to date, under the ownership of Iveco.[48]
 

Celt83

Member
Livestock Farmer
First job today was the vet to this 30 day old calf who had some how managed to break its leg. To high up to fix so put him to sleep. Normally Death doesn’t bother me in the slightest but holding this little chap as he drifted off really got to me today. View attachment 891274
[/QUOTE}

That was a sympathy like Beams, we lost a calf yesterday and it choked me up for a few hours.

People say if you have livestock you have dead stock, but no matter how much you get used to it it still hurts.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
179,184
Messages
4,080,473
Members
44,932
Latest member
luatbadinh

Your chance to help design ELMS

  • 3,076
  • 87

Environmental Land Management - Defra Director answers Farming Forum members questions about the new scheme
Top