Tractors...COST TO CHANGE!!!

Im curious what the difference in cost to change between brands is? Some figures of other peoples experiences would be interesting for those that arent afraid to share info ill start

2012 NH T7200 sold last summer 10,500hrs for 20,000

2020 NH T7210 80,000 bought

60k to change
 

Clive

Staff Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lichfield
Someone told me the other day a 10k hr fendt 724 is 80k and 160k for a new one😮 can someone explain why these are so popular?

Because they are good machines and as you point out only loose 50% of value in 10k hours. - your NH apparently lost 75% of it’s value in the same period, based on “cost to change“ not. ” depreciation”
 
Cost to change is a meaningless figure really. You aren't buying the very same machine, surely? One will be newer than the other, even if you only ever use it for the same jobs. The important bit is what has machine A cost me overall in £ per hour during its tenure and am I happy to continue to paying that, will it increase as a failure becomes more likely or should I buy B because reason(s): X,Y or Z? Such as more reliable, old machine can't do what I intend to do, operator refuses to drive old machine, etc etc etc. And so on.

If you are only interested in calculator figures then I dare say a lot of farms should be running tractors to 20,000 hours as it would possibly be cheaper but it is possible some machines won't retain their full functionality to that 'age'.
 

MrNoo

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Cirencester
Surely with numbers like that they are trying to make money at both ends. A 5000 hour T6090 will surely sell for more than that if it tidy as they are quite sought after?
Yes of course, I would put it around £42'ish, it has steering too and has been very well looked after, quite a rare old girl so will try and keep her, who knows she may go up in value one day!!!
I think it was £72k brand new but not 100% certain, I'd have to look at my books.
 
Because they are good machines and as you point out only loose 50% of value in 10k hours. - your NH apparently lost 75% of it’s value in the same period, based on “cost to change“ not. ” depreciation”
yes no doubt they are good machines as are NH, the problem however is 50% happens to be a serious amount of money to loose and substantially more than the blue one? even in depreciation terms the fendt has prob lost 55k while the nh has lost 45k
 

oil barron

Member
Location
Aberdeenshire
another point id make is the 80k fendt was for sale privately so its likely that as a trade in it may only be worth 70k, so a staggering 90k to change and 65k depreciation, what have people found with jds, valtra, masseys etc?
I doubt the trade would even offer 70k for a 10,000 hr tractor. The list of potential buyers for a machine like that at that price tag is very small.
 

Drillman

Member
Mixed Farmer
No such thing as a cheap tractor to buy or own,

biggest factor is wether it’s a tool to do a job or a penis extension.

most of us can’t justify the tractors we own the on a pure cost basis but have them cos we like shiny paint, need to keep the driver happy or dare I say it have tiny dicks!
 

Clive

Staff Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lichfield
yes no doubt they are good machines as are NH, the problem however is 50% happens to be a serious amount of money to loose and substantially more than the blue one? even in depreciation terms the fendt has prob lost 55k while the nh has lost 45k

75% is also a serious amount to lose - more than 50% in fact


covered this before so won't go around in circles again on this thread but in proper depreciation terms our last 724 lost 25k in 5 years 5k hours - that's, not a bad cost per hour depreciation at £5/hr , my only regret is I should have kept it to 10k really but the deal was right to change at the time

I've run most makes over the years and the Fendt are the cheapest to operate I've had overall, I rarely get to drive them myself so really don't care much about anything other than the numbers / reliability / back up and service these days


cost to buy is of little relevance as long as you have the ability to finance that (and cost that finance of course ) - its cost of ownership that you should focus upon

I do accept however there are many ways to skin the same cat ! and lots of other good quality manufacturers out there, we all just find different ways !
 
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Top cereal and oilseed growers honoured at the Yield Enhancement Network Awards 2021

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Despite an average growing year for most crops, many growers managed to go above and beyond their predicted max yields, with Lincolnshire grower Tim Lamyman taking the top spots for his wheat yields and his world record breaking winter barley yield.

The highest cereal and oilseed yields achieved at harvest 2021 were announced at this year’s Yield Enhancement Network (YEN) Awards on Wednesday 24th November at the Croptec Show. With award presentations by Tom Bradshaw, Vice President of NFU, 24 farms took home the evening’s top awards for highest yield and highest potential yield achieved for wheat, winter and spring barley, oats, and oilseed. The 2021 winners came from all corners of the UK, as well as from as far afield as Finland and New Zealand.

Familiar names from 2020 made the...
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