Tractors that never made production

Two Tone

Member
Mixed Farmer
Hydrostatic gearbox, not quite the same. Excellent for loader work, not so good pulling a plough
Maybe we should have another thread being:
Tractors that SHOULD never HAVE made production.

The IH Hydro 84 would have been number 1 on it.

It couldn't pull the skin off a rice pudding when it got up to working temperature!
Nor could it maintain any set forward speed on any hills whilst on a sprayer or fertiliser spreader.
 
1E29BA5D-F65C-4413-A4E2-03C8C30B8556.jpeg
Zetor Maxterra
 

Roy_H

Member
Avenge Wild Oat herbicide was another example of something that was developed for one reason, but turned out to have another, even more beneficial effect.
It was designed to be a Mildew fungicide, that as it happened was also found to control Wild Oats. That pushed its potential usage up and the price by 10 fold!
Serendipity! I remember when I used it the included instruction leaflet used to mention the fact that when used on spring barley it would also control mildew.
The story goes that Monsanto were in the process of developing a new wild oat herbicide and one formula they tried not only killed wild oats but almost anything else with a green leaf, not only that the chemical translocated into the root system and killed it off too. Yep, that's how Roundup was born.
 

AndrewB

Member
Location
Kincardineshire
I once drove a 8000 series while on a corse at jd, it had full independent suspension all round, the front suspension made it to production (ILS) but they axed the rear setup. Hell of smooth ride but I think the production cost made it unviable as an option due to all the massive moving parts. Wish I’d got some pics of it now (don’t think they where to keen on photos of there prototypes and it was pre sneaky smart phones:cautious:), it was a fantastic bit of engineering though,

I think I have pictures of that tractor somewhere, we had one 8520 on a farm in Western Australia for a month ( December 2003) to evaluate, it was brilliant the farmer tried to buy it but John Deere said no, I think there was about 5 built. Fully independent rear suspension very similar to TLS but much bigger.
 

Scribus

Member
Location
Central Atlantic
Serendipity! I remember when I used it the included instruction leaflet used to mention the fact that when used on spring barley it would also control mildew.
The story goes that Monsanto were in the process of developing a new wild oat herbicide and one formula they tried not only killed wild oats but almost anything else with a green leaf, not only that the chemical translocated into the root system and killed it off too. Yep, that's how Roundup was born.

Glyphosphate was 'discovered' by John Franz who was noted as a methodical research chemist within Monsanto. The company had a particularly close association with phosphates having invested heavily in mines and processing facilities over the years. One of the primary uses of the mineral was in detergents as it aided the cleaning process but environmental concerns in the late sixties saw the demises of such products. Alternative outlets were needed so Franz was set to work testing phosphate based molecules for their potential as plant growth inhibitors. This was no accident, Monsanto had a been looking for such chemicals for some time but the project had languished and Franz reinvigorated it in a bid to find a new market for the company's phosphorus reserves.

In 1970 the second chemical he tested turned up trumps (he always ascribed this to luck) and within two years the compound was showing tremendous potential in field trials. It was branded as Roundup and was approved for use as a herbicide in America in 1974.
 

Roy_H

Member
Glyphosphate was 'discovered' by John Franz who was noted as a methodical research chemist within Monsanto. The company had a particularly close association with phosphates having invested heavily in mines and processing facilities over the years. One of the primary uses of the mineral was in detergents as it aided the cleaning process but environmental concerns in the late sixties saw the demises of such products. Alternative outlets were needed so Franz was set to work testing phosphate based molecules for their potential as plant growth inhibitors. This was no accident, Monsanto had a been looking for such chemicals for some time but the project had languished and Franz reinvigorated it in a bid to find a new market for the company's phosphorus reserves.

In 1970 the second chemical he tested turned up trumps (he always ascribed this to luck) and within two years the compound was showing tremendous potential in field trials. It was branded as Roundup and was approved for use as a herbicide in America in 1974.
I stand corrected:)
 

Exfarmer

Member
Location
Bury St Edmunds
Glyphosphate was 'discovered' by John Franz who was noted as a methodical research chemist within Monsanto. The company had a particularly close association with phosphates having invested heavily in mines and processing facilities over the years. One of the primary uses of the mineral was in detergents as it aided the cleaning process but environmental concerns in the late sixties saw the demises of such products. Alternative outlets were needed so Franz was set to work testing phosphate based molecules for their potential as plant growth inhibitors. This was no accident, Monsanto had a been looking for such chemicals for some time but the project had languished and Franz reinvigorated it in a bid to find a new market for the company's phosphorus reserves.

In 1970 the second chemical he tested turned up trumps (he always ascribed this to luck) and within two years the compound was showing tremendous potential in field trials. It was branded as Roundup and was approved for use as a herbicide in America in 1974.

Strangely Gramoxone was discovered in the research connected to fairy liquid!
 

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Written by Charlotte Cunningham from CPM Magazine

JCB has launched new Fastrac 4000 and 8000 Series tractors with an all-new electronics infrastructure which is claimed to deliver higher levels of performance. According to JCB, the new Fastrac iCon operator environment has three key features: iConfigure – creating a bespoke control experience for every operator iConnect – integrating advanced precision agriculture technology iControl – redefining operation through new driveline software The 175hp to 348hp (133kW to 260kW) Fastracs feature the new iCon armrest console and touch-screen display to provide flexibility in operator allocation and operator information, as well as a new transmission control strategy to enhance operator comfort and powertrain efficiency, says the manufacturer...
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