UK and EU conclude agreement on catch levels for 2021

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UK and EU conclude agreement on catch levels for 2021

Written by Defra Press Office

Fish in polystyrene boxes on ice
There is positive coverage today following our announcement that we have concluded annual fisheries negotiations with the EU. The announcement has been covered by City AM and The Express.

The total value of the UK-EU fishing opportunities for the UK in 2021 is approximately £333 million.

The negotiations with the EU follow the UK new status as an independent coastal State outside the Common Fisheries Policy. The UK will continue to negotiate annually with the EU on catch limits under the terms of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement.

The agreement for 2021 ensures that the fishing industry has certainty on the catch limits for 70 shared fish stocks for the rest of 2021.

Both parties have also committed to exchanging fishing quota on an interim basis ahead of a longer-term exchange system which will be set up by the Specialised Committee on Fisheries.

Environment Secretary George Eustice said:

As we move forward as an independent coastal State, we have been steadfast in representing the interests of our industry and seeking to manage our fisheries more sustainably.

This agreement provides certainty to our fishing industry and we now have a stable platform in place for managing our fisheries this year and in future years.
As a result of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement and these negotiations, the UK fleet will have around 26,000 tonnes more quota for these stocks compared with quotas allocated in 2020. This increase is estimated to be worth around £27 million.

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Could a ‘Meat Tax’ be on the cards in the UK?

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Written by Richard Halleron from Agriland

The latest machination coming from the so-called ‘opinion formers’, who seem to have the ear of government advisors in London, is the introduction of a ‘Meat Tax’ at consumer level.

This approach, it is argued, would have the combined impact of reducing meat consumption levels (I can really see the health benefits coming through now), while also helping to reduce the overall carbon footprint of production agriculture.

What absolute drivel! In my opinion, none of this makes sense at any level. This is a scurrilous and unfounded attack on livestock farming in this part of the world.

Yet, it has to be taken seriously. I make this point because economists at Rothamsted Research have already crunched the numbers where the introduction of a ‘UK...
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