UK to join the CPTPP?

Danllan

Member
Location
Sir Gar / Carms
The application to join is being made. Currently the organisation accounts for >13% of world trade and consists of Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam.

If we succeed in our application to join, the group's proportion of world trade will immediately increase to 17%. Further, and importantly, many of the current members have very healthily growing economies, so it is very likely that the figure will rise to >20% by the end of the decade.

It is not unlikely that, under the newly ensconced President Biden, the US will also apply to join sometime soon. One of the requirements for membership is that there are free trade agreements with all other members. Interesting times.
 

br jones

Member
The application to join is being made. Currently the organisation accounts for >13% of world trade and consists of Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam.

If we succeed in our application to join, the group's proportion of world trade will immediately increase to 17%. Further, and importantly, many of the current members have very healthily growing economies, so it is very likely that the figure will rise to >20% by the end of the decade.

It is not unlikely that, under the newly ensconced President Biden, the US will also apply to join sometime soon. One of the requirements for membership is that there are free trade agreements with all other members. Interesting times.
A free trade deal ,no tariffs with nigh on a possible billon people ,maybe then the eu may join ?
 

Danllan

Member
Location
Sir Gar / Carms
A free trade deal ,no tariffs with nigh on a possible billon people ,maybe then the eu may join ?
As we know, that could take a very long time and if the US does so they would find it awkward. That's because the EU have a policy of trying to force other parties to offer them the same trade terms that those parties may make in future deals elsewhere.

They put something of the kind in our agreement with them, fortunately it isn't watertight - or, I hope, we wouldn't have signed it - so it doesn't matter. But there is no way, on principle, the US would even consider allowing such a thing.

They, the EU, would also find themselves with problems regarding the UK in that regard, because all the stuff they were desperate to include regarding NI - don't laugh - would be out the window with the stroke of a pen.
 

bobk

Member
Location
stafford
Yes Trumpy pulled out so there's a fair chance sleepy Joe may want to be involved , a deal with the US is a game changer
 

Ashtree

Member
EU already has a deal with Japan, Canada, Singapore and Vietnam. It is well down the road on an agreement with Indonesia. Right there is the bulk of the value of trade with this block. EU also negotiating with Australia.
So of course, UK now has its own deal with Japan and Canada. It has lost the benefits from the EU - Vietnam and Singapore deals, which it will recover once it’s joins this block.
Can somebody explain to a simple cow farmer, what great “incremental” trade benefits will accrue to UK from this deal?
 

Muck Spreader

Member
Location
Limousin
EU already has a deal with Japan, Canada, Singapore and Vietnam. It is well down the road on an agreement with Indonesia. Right there is the bulk of the value of trade with this block. EU also negotiating with Australia.
So of course, UK now has its own deal with Japan and Canada. It has lost the benefits from the EU - Vietnam and Singapore deals, which it will recover once it’s joins this block.
Can somebody explain to a simple cow farmer, what great “incremental” trade benefits will accrue to UK from this deal?
Probably benefits to some food and wine producers in Australia, NZ and Canada and the easing of work visas for migrants to come into the UK. So, it could be Mexicans picking veg in East Anglia rather than Rumanians. :D

Actually forgot, it will be very good for Scotland and sales of Scotch Whiskey and independence income. :hungry: :D
 
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Ashtree

Member
Probably benefits to some food and wine producers in Australia, NZ and Canada and the easing of work visas for migrants to come into the UK. So, it could be Mexicans picking veg in East Anglia rather than Rumanians. :D
What happens to CONZUK? Will UK have three trade deals with Canada? The direct version, the CONZUK version, and this new version! They will have two versions with Japan.... (as if the last one didn’t work out badly enough) Then there’s Australia and NZ, that will be double entendre as well!
 

Muck Spreader

Member
Location
Limousin
What happens to CONZUK? Will UK have three trade deals with Canada? The direct version, the CONZUK version, and this new version! They will have two versions with Japan.... (as if the last one didn’t work out badly enough) Then there’s Australia and NZ, that will be double entendre as well!
Trade with the Empire/Commonwealth couldn't generate enough income 60 years ago to keep the UK solvent, hence the desperation to join the EEC. I doubt much has changed since.
 

Danllan

Member
Location
Sir Gar / Carms
What happens to CONZUK? Will UK have three trade deals with Canada? The direct version, the CONZUK version, and this new version! They will have two versions with Japan.... (as if the last one didn’t work out badly enough) Then there’s Australia and NZ, that will be double entendre as well!
Trade with the Empire/Commonwealth couldn't generate enough income 60 years ago to keep the UK solvent, hence the desperation to join the EEC. I doubt much has changed since.
One reason for my starting this thread was to see if the usual suspects would come out with the vitriol even now, and sure enough... you never fail to.

I think that even after the UK bails you lot out of your vaccine disaster, you will still be at it, says it all.
 

Ashtree

Member
One reason for my starting this thread was to see if the usual suspects would come out with the vitriol even now, and sure enough... you never fail to.

I think that even after the UK bails you lot out of your vaccine disaster, you will still be at it, says it all.
What an utter puerile post. “One of the reasons I started ... .... to flush out enemies of the kingdom”!
Give me a break please.
The question “every Brexiteer” needs to ask, nay “demand” answers for, is “exactly” the central question I asked. Where’s the beef? Where’s the “incremental” benefit?
YOU, seem to be in the incredible position of having some “extremely” generous customers who “share” in the extra costs and delays shipping “your” product to Germany despite it being the “your” choice to have these costs come about in the first instance.
Now I’m thinking of the many, many thousands of businesses who don’t have such generous customers, and who are now facing up to a serious situation. I’m thinking about “what the hell, this mirage of a deal”, will do for those businesses NOW!
A nice convenient distraction for the government to make a bit of headlines. It doesn’t, do ANYTHING for the quicksand effect of the Brexit deal in the here and now, and for the very, very considerable future.
 

le bon paysan

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Limousin, France
As we know, that could take a very long time and if the US does so they would find it awkward. That's because the EU have a policy of trying to force other parties to offer them the same trade terms that those parties may make in future deals elsewhere.

They put something of the kind in our agreement with them, fortunately it isn't watertight - or, I hope, we wouldn't have signed it - so it doesn't matter. But there is no way, on principle, the US would even consider allowing such a thing.

They, the EU, would also find themselves with problems regarding the UK in that regard, because all the stuff they were desperate to include regarding NI - don't laugh - would be out the window with the stroke of a pen.
Every trade deal the EU has signed, says
" you cannot offer any other " third country" better terms on trade than this deal, without offering and agreeing those terms with the EU, before signing a deal with the third country"
You laughed and said" the EU even believe it too!"
Breaking this clause has punitive tariffs and penalties
 
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le bon paysan

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Limousin, France
Where’s the vitriol? I haven’t read every word, but all I see are some probing questions, and that’s it. Am I missing something?
If you don't get on board the Fantastic Brexit deal bus. You're not allowed to ask !
If you're on it, any one asking questions let alone probing ones, is just spiteful/ bitter/ nasty take your pick.
It's the Brexit playground.
 

Ashtree

Member
If you don't get on board the Fantastic Brexit deal bus. You're not allowed to ask !
If you're on it, any one asking questions let alone probing ones, is just spiteful/ bitter/ nasty take your pick.
It's the Brexit playground.
Exactly. The mature thing for Brexiters and non Brexiters alike, is to challenge very, very forcefully, the government on the effects of the deal.
I can give two very specific instances of two British companies I deal with on a weekly basis, where they are both “aghast” at what is currently happening. That’s quoting the sales manager of one, when I spoke to him last Friday.
One is a customer of ours, where we have two pallets of valves shipped to them two weeks ago tomorrow. The still haven’t got the delivered. Tied up in British customs. Not French bring arsey here ..., it’s British customs. Another pallet shipped Tuesday last week with the exact same paperwork, was delivered last Friday. How so?????
The other case, is a supplier of ours, who deliver a large artic of non ferrous metal to ROI weekly. That truck has done its weekly delivery every Wednesday for longer than I can remember. Great company and great service.
Sales manager calls me on Friday to apologise about the drop in service levels in January. Furthermore he tells me, UK customs told them last week they have to pay 5.5% tariff on entry to UK from the EU, which of course he now has to pass on to his customers. Further to that, their general cost of operations due to paperwork and other inefficiencies is gone up by several percent.

These are just two great British companies, I have in my work been trading with for more than twenty years. Both quite frankly are being fudged over by Brexit and the great deal.
Neither, I can absolutely assure you are happy. Some aspirational deal with countries in SE Asia, is about as useful to these guys, as a toothpick for cutting concrete.
 
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Martin Holden

Member
Grassland Exhibitor
Location
Cheltenham
Now then Martin, you must be awaiting me pulling your leg about calling “black magic” - “black beauty”?
😁
Listen! I know the difference! Magic was the Kadett and beauty was Ari’s! Not as knowledgeable as that Steve Pugh but all those images of Epynt make me want to go back there. Do you ever do Epynt?
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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