Venezula economic collapse continues

Discussion in 'Brexit & Politics' started by wanton dwarf, Jan 12, 2018.

  1. wanton dwarf

    wanton dwarf Member

  2. Ashtree

    Ashtree Member

  3. Ashtree

    Ashtree Member

  4. wanton dwarf

    wanton dwarf Member


    Says the man from the Country which recently went bankrupt.
     
    Ashtree likes this.
  5. turbo

    turbo Member

    Location:
    lincs
    No they are the model that junker and his palls want to follow but they will be plenty of meat to go round from Canada so you won't have to lock yours up
     
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  6. Exfarmer

    Exfarmer Member

    Location:
    Bury St Edmunds
    Venezaula, is the richest counttry in the world!
    More oil than Saudi Arabia, and less population.
    What could go wrong!
     
  7. Looking at the raw statistics, it is hard to see how you can possibly cock Venezuela up. You need to try very very hard....
     
  8. will l

    will l Member

    Location:
    41160 loir et cher
    Venezuela is the name of the country
    the oil reserves are indeed large but the quality is poor
    large quantities of which were sold to china at poor price and given to cuba for nothing
    nationalisation of land and food production destroyed agriculture,
    Yes the people are hungry
    it is easy to take the pee,with a full belly.
     
  9. Exfarmer

    Exfarmer Member

    Location:
    Bury St Edmunds
    The problems with Venezaulas oil is purely concerned with it sending shipments consistently contaminated with water, not a difficult thing for a refinery to sort, except of course Venezaulas refineries are nationalised.
    This has given it a poor reputation and it is not the preferred oil of choice .
    However the USA is still Venezuala’s largest customer although China is rapidly increasing its share as US imports have dropped partly due to fracking.
    It was supplying Cuba with oil in a deal whereby Cuba ran the Venezaula health service in return. This was a deal done in the best of Socialist principles, and cost Venezaula’s economy dearly.
    The people of the this benighted country have starvation and shops empty, while the families of the countries leaders lead the life of Saudi princelings.
     
  10. will l

    will l Member

    Location:
    41160 loir et cher
    The quality problems historically come from its high sulphur content more recently yes contamination has been an issue,
    Dont believe all you read about quantity of oil reserves either, the chavez regime vastly exagerated them,
     
  11. Exfarmer

    Exfarmer Member

    Location:
    Bury St Edmunds
    Both OPEC and the US EIA recognise that Venezuela has the highest oil reserves, the dispute may well be over the recoverable reserves, as a fair amount is in tar sand. However it is widely recognised that this tar sand oil is much different to the Athabasca reserves which are very much heavier forms of bitumen and difficult to extract.
    The Venezuelan tar sand is much lighter but is buried giiving its own set of not insuperable problems.
    It is believed that Venezuela has currently 250 years of production of relatively easy to recover oil at todays production rates.
     
  12. will l

    will l Member

    Location:
    41160 loir et cher
    It also cost many a poor venezuelan there life,
     
  13. wanton dwarf

    wanton dwarf Member


    I've never understood ANY country not wanting a balanced economy.

    If nothing else it allows good mental health for all the population, everyone having a value in society, money flowing around all sections of society and a basis to create family life from.

    Why work when the state pays you other peoples money ?

    How many times have we seen "Universal Income" from socialists & liberals ? This will be the end result .. value placed on activities that are worth very little if not nothing, skills lost, assets stripped ...
     
  14. beardface

    beardface Member

    Location:
    East Yorkshire
    And Corbyn and his chins want to nationalise everything too :whistle:. Could easily gangs hanging round bins in big cities if he gets in just like Venezuela
     
  15. Jungle Bill

    Jungle Bill Member

    Location:
    Angus
    I used to work in Venezuela, a wonderful place to be in the 1970s and early 80s, then it started to have all the same issues that Brexit is bringing. Much the same as what my uncle who farmed in Rhodesia said made him leave when I talked to him about Venezuela.
     
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  16. Danllan

    Danllan Member

    I did some work with BG Exploration on the Orinoco Delta about twenty years ago, things were not great then for most Venezuelans and got ever-worse under socialism; Zim' is shafted too, due to socialism.

    Brexit leading to a situation like either of those? o_O Hysterical snowflakery and sulky remainer tantrums. Remember to eat your words in a few years, won't you?
     
  17. Jungle Bill

    Jungle Bill Member

    Location:
    Angus
    No, not a snowflake, l’m apolitical, not overly attached to any one country, currently working in the UK to ensure my employers have a good business in 5 and 10 years time whatever happens.

    UK is possibly only one election away from socialism, if this happens it will be the result of people voting for change from a dysfunctional political situation which is being manipulated by a small number of very rich, greedy self interested people. (Similar to Zim & Ven?)

    Foreign academics and other qualified people currently working in UK are going home again as long term EU funded multinational projects are no longer prepared to include UK in light of uncertainty. I have had UK research projects cancelled which have now started again elsewhere with the same ex UK based researchers.

    Neighbouring countries are worried about the consequences for them and have no idea of what is going on or why. An Austrian friend told me the Brexit vote was like a suicide in the family.

    It is becoming very difficult to get long term contracts with overseas suppliers, even priced in Euros or Dollars, there is a shortage of seasonal workers throughout Europe so they are deciding to stay in the eurozone to remove any exchange rate shocks.

    Maybe I was lazy to use Brexit as a shorthand for political uncertainty and incompetence, but I’ve been in enough hairy situations around the world to be very aware of patterns of change and I’m noticing some of them here. I hope things here never get as bad as Zim and Ven here but it’s terrifying how quickly things get out of hand - just imagine any big UK city with food shortages.
     
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  18. Danllan

    Danllan Member

    Thanks for a more reasoned and explanatory post, but you are still way off the mark. Socialism was 'only an election away' with Kinnock and then with Miliband, it never happened.

    Admittedly we are further from the chaos of the late 70s now so some are too young to remember it, and May fought an appalling election last year, but the UK just isn't left-leaning at bottom, unlike e.g. France. At the next GE May will be gone and the Conservatives will have been ruthless in their choice of her successor much as Labour were to bring in Blair, they will have a single criterion: electability.

    That, meaning even a merely competent Tory leader, added to more economic certainty and Corbyn ceasing to be the 'new thing' will mean no chance of a Socialist UK. It is well know that the Conservatives - and the Liberals and, to a lesser extent the SNP - didn't lay into Corbyn during the last election because they didn't see him as much of a threat and, in fact, as a political asset to them. That won't be the case next time and there are a great many shots waiting for him in their respective lockers.

    I know of foreign academics from Europe, North America, Australasia and the Far East who have just come or are coming to the UK, ditto investment and people in business. There is no surprise in those against Brexit talking it down and playing up every possible problem; the thing is, the vast majority of these things haven't happened, or have been minimal when compared to the dire predictions made and it is all getting rather repetitive and tedious.

    The UK is a big economy, we will overcome any problems and continue to prosper, even if some don't want that and actually try to prevent us from doing so. :)
     
  19. Are the protests still going on against the regime?
     

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