Very early or very late?!

MDL POWERUP

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This appeared two days ago
 

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hendrebc

Member
Livestock Farmer
I had one about 10years ago mid September he was born. Stayed with his mother till he was sold fat for a good price in February/march. He was never dosed, sprayed with pour on or fed anything other than grass or silage. Thinking about him makes me wonder why we don't see more September lambing flocks. Snow and mud come to mind but it would be a cheap time to lamb there's almost always grass in September.
 

Kiwi Pete

Member
Livestock Farmer
I had one about 10years ago mid September he was born. Stayed with his mother till he was sold fat for a good price in February/march. He was never dosed, sprayed with pour on or fed anything other than grass or silage. Thinking about him makes me wonder why we don't see more September lambing flocks. Snow and mud come to mind but it would be a cheap time to lamb there's almost always grass in September.
You and your unfair advantages, with your September lambings :mad::mad:

You would have made 'The Easter Boat'

:p:p
 

unlacedgecko

Member
Livestock Farmer
I had one about 10years ago mid September he was born. Stayed with his mother till he was sold fat for a good price in February/march. He was never dosed, sprayed with pour on or fed anything other than grass or silage. Thinking about him makes me wonder why we don't see more September lambing flocks. Snow and mud come to mind but it would be a cheap time to lamb there's almost always grass in September.

I keep thinking about it as a way to get better margin out of dairy tack land.
 

elmo

Member
Location
West Wales
Had one born last year about this time, sold in early March for £110 after no cake/meds etc.
Wish i had a few 100 of them each year!
the hardest thing would be to find a breed that would be in season at the right time. Dorsets and a few others might work though. You'd need plenty of grass later on or the ewe will dry up and you'll have a scraggy looking lamb that won't come to anything until it gets some grass next year.
 

taff

Member
Lambing here as well dorset ewes crossed to an aberblack ram or back to a dorset ram. Was going out of it slowly for a few years but now in the process of going over to autumn lambing as the main flock due to grass availability and possibly export issues caused by brexit!! and I prefer it more as I get more time on the beach in the summer rather than chasing ewes and lamb's around with a bottle of crovect!!!
 
Tell us more please. Breed, systems, when will the lambs be sold?

Pretty straight forward really but I’ve not said much on here until we got to grips with it.

Starting with a Dorset base, and hoping to breed up our own composite, currently lambing Dorset Hoggs all to Charmoise rams. Ewe lambs will be retained and go from there.

Ewes have not seen any hard feed and are being Lambed out, currently on hay / haylage ground. At about three - four weeks of age lambs and ewes will go into oats / vetch cover crops to be rotationally grazed through winter. Lambs will hopefully be finished through winter and into early spring.

Ewes will dry off, be tupped in April and then run on the available permanent pasture while dry before repeating.

Hopefully makes better use of available land and staffing and avoids such issues as worms, fly strike etc.

We shall see, it’s been a total punt in the dark but we spent a lot of time sourcing the right genetics to start so that’s helped. Like they say, watch this space, it’s currently all theory!
 
I had one about 10years ago mid September he was born. Stayed with his mother till he was sold fat for a good price in February/march. He was never dosed, sprayed with pour on or fed anything other than grass or silage. Thinking about him makes me wonder why we don't see more September lambing flocks. Snow and mud come to mind but it would be a cheap time to lamb there's almost always grass in September.
I've always thought that there was potential in the UK for a highly fecund accelerated lambing flock, something like the flock run at Cornell university.
 

hendrebc

Member
Livestock Farmer
Pretty straight forward really but I’ve not said much on here until we got to grips with it.

Starting with a Dorset base, and hoping to breed up our own composite, currently lambing Dorset Hoggs all to Charmoise rams. Ewe lambs will be retained and go from there.

Ewes have not seen any hard feed and are being Lambed out, currently on hay / haylage ground. At about three - four weeks of age lambs and ewes will go into oats / vetch cover crops to be rotationally grazed through winter. Lambs will hopefully be finished through winter and into early spring.

Ewes will dry off, be tupped in April and then run on the available permanent pasture while dry before repeating.

Hopefully makes better use of available land and staffing and avoids such issues as worms, fly strike etc.

We shall see, it’s been a total punt in the dark but we spent a lot of time sourcing the right genetics to start so that’s helped. Like they say, watch this space, it’s currently all theory!
Very interesting. Keep us posted please (y)
 

firther

Member
Location
holmfirth
I had one about 10years ago mid September he was born. Stayed with his mother till he was sold fat for a good price in February/march. He was never dosed, sprayed with pour on or fed anything other than grass or silage. Thinking about him makes me wonder why we don't see more September lambing flocks. Snow and mud come to mind but it would be a cheap time to lamb there's almost always grass in September.

there is no grass from October onwards though, not here anyway lol
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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