Vine bbc 12 to 2 today

I am always disappointed that when these things make it to national radio, the best our industry can put forward to seize the golden opportunity to set the record straight, is a shouty wurzel.
That’s because they select who they want on the programme with preconceived ideas and a preconceived conclusion

the debate during foot and mouth with Kirsty walk as presenter and the nfu president in the audience was not allowed a say
the telephone poll was who surports farmers the result was 70% or respondents
off air when k walk got the result in hearear piece she questioned the result and had no summery prepared for a majority surport of farmers

bbc is habitually biased on all issues
 
That's two instances today of media amateurs being put on national radio. Quite why we still haven't learnt that it is a job for paid professionals is baffling. It's not as if we don't have the money.
the problem is that in farming has thousands of experts that will go on a programme if asked by a researcher
if a supermarket was asked they would refer the reseacher to the british retail consortium
a car manufacture would say get hold of the british motor manufactuers

but many farmers would say yes i will do it rather than referring the researcher to their own representative nfu cla tfa ect
 

nev12345

Member
One of JV's producer called me a few weeks ago to ask me to talk about another ag issue. No idea how they got my number, and I had no particular specialism in the area, but could have easily BS'd my way through it if I'd have wanted to.

I didn't hear JV today but from the gist of this thread the farmer came over well. This could so easily have a PR disaster for agriculture had some random farmer taken the call and thought they would have a go.

After giving the producer who called me a little carefully worded background, I handed my call straight on to the NFU, who to be fair did a good job at short notice. We need to be careful how our industry comes over, especially on such a widely listened show like JV.

And we can't blame the NFU unless they've been offered the chance to talk and declined. They can't think for every farmer.
 

Will 1594

Member
Arable Farmer
I am always disappointed that when these things make it to national radio, the best our industry can put forward to seize the golden opportunity to set the record straight, is a shouty wurzel.
thought colin ( shouty yokel 😂) was on after the yorkshire lad
colin cloude be one of somerset’s best digger drivers and restores of old massey combined and tractors
he is quite a character
have had quite a few interesting nights in oak hill pub few years ago
 

nev12345

Member
Yes they can. It's called doing your job properly.
https://thefarmingforum.co.uk/index...ommunications-team.328028/page-6#post-7168444
What other industry the size of UK ag thinks it can get away with shoving amateurs in front of a microphone ?
I fail to see how the NFU can read the mind of a Jeremey Vine producer, responding to a topic that was at least ten days old at the time. And who's first port of call was to ring me, who is far from an expert on the particular subject. What can the NFU do about that?

What that producer wanted was an media untrained farmer to go head to head on the air against an actual, full time anti.

As farmers what we all need to do is think "Am I *actually* the best person for this? What would a corporate company do?"

And then refer the producer to the NFU, or TFA, or AICC or whoever. But at the very least understand that getting it wrong could be disaterous.
 

delilah

Member
I fail to see how the NFU can read the mind of a Jeremey Vine producer, responding to a topic that was at least ten days old at the time. And who's first port of call was to ring me, who is far from an expert on the particular subject. What can the NFU do about that?

What that producer wanted was an media untrained farmer to go head to head on the air against an actual, full time anti.

As farmers what we all need to do is think "Am I *actually* the best person for this? What would a corporate company do?"

And then refer the producer to the NFU, or TFA, or AICC or whoever. But at the very least understand that getting it wrong could be disaterous.

Yeah I don't think you've read what I said about Jane Bickerstaff. Again, it's called doing your job properly.
 

nev12345

Member
Yeah I don't think you've read what I said about Jane Bickerstaff. Again, it's called doing your job properly.
No I read it, and I do get your point. And the NFU could definitely do more in this regard, but plastic bottles are very different to the entirety of British agriculture. And it's not going to stop a producer calling a random farmer and asking him or her just to have a go.
 

David.

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
J11 M40
thought colin ( shouty yokel 😂) was on after the yorkshire lad
colin cloude be one of somerset’s best digger drivers and restores of old massey combined and tractors
he is quite a character
have had quite a few interesting nights in oak hill pub few years ago
I meant the man no personal disrespect.
But they do always seem to try hard to find a poorly briefed "stereotypical farmer" sounding type, to put on the spot.
Our industry should be all over this PR stuff, with media savvy representatives ready to counter such misinformation at a moments notice.
We need someone who pops up instantly, just like Sara Keays used to do at the Tory Conference.
 

Robt

Member
Location
Suffolk
I meant the man no personal disrespect.
But they do always seem to try hard to find a poorly briefed "stereotypical farmer" sounding type, to put on the spot.
Our industry should be all over this PR stuff, with media savvy representatives ready to counter such misinformation at a moments notice.
We need someone who pops up instantly just like Sara Keays used to do at the Tory Conference.
Sadly when the engagement officer can only post once on here for his £90 k salary what hope do we have…
 

silverfox

Member
Location
Shropshire
I suppose it’s not clear cut that every farmer immediately supports one side of the argument.
Theres a big difference between a normal application of FYM or a reasonable amount of slurry onto a grass crop, or a field blacked over by contractors with 4/5 oversized tankers that cut up all the grass verges and generally pee off the villagers that are normally supportive of the local farmers.
You only have to read the local FB pages to see how some of this industrial scale slurry spreading is giving us all a bad name . I’ve been blamed in the past and made number one village villain by someone else’s ,outside of the area slurry which got in to my ditch which runs through the village . I’ve also non farming friends that are quite rightly fed up of their verges chewed up by these oversized sh!t carts as he calls them . ( tin hat on )
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

court-640x360.jpg
A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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