Weaving GD user thread

Alistair Nelson

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
E Yorks
The thing I like is the weight never changes you’ve got what you’ve got and at just about 4t across 30 coulters That’s in theory 133kg per coulter which on our ground is more than enough particularly when you take into account the lead angle on the disc. Front tank has wheels under it, tractors on duals all round could just do with a pair of balancing wheels on the ends wings but in truth no really necessary
 

tr250

Member
Location
Northants
The thing I like is the weight never changes you’ve got what you’ve got and at just about 4t across 30 coulters That’s in theory 133kg per coulter which on our ground is more than enough particularly when you take into account the lead angle on the disc. Front tank has wheels under it, tractors on duals all round could just do with a pair of balancing wheels on the ends wings but in truth no really necessary
Yes sounds a good setup I like the idea of a gd and a sabre tine toolbar it would be ideal if there was a flat space on the gd to be able to put weights on if needed with the loader. Trouble is in my situation I need the tractor on and off so often
 

Two Tone

Member
Mixed Farmer
Anybody had problems with the feed roller sensor, showing an error like this?:
391DE405-AFC0-40C1-9C56-4891E97C9C74.jpeg

It suggests that a slip clutch between the drive motor and the feed roller is slipping.
Both Simon Weaving and Mike Lane were very helpful in diagnosing the problem.
I got somebody to check that the feed roller was actually turning, which it was. However the alarm sounded about 5 seconds after starting each drill run, repeating every 30 seconds.
I checked the sensor distance from the magnet on the end on the feed roller shaft as Mike had suggested, but this made no difference.
Confident that the error was false, I was able to carry on drilling, until Weaving’s are able to come and check out the fault. However, I had to press the ‘OK’ button every 30 seconds to keep going.
 

Badshot

Member
Location
Kent
Anybody had problems with the feed roller sensor, showing an error like this?:
View attachment 1029581
It suggests that a slip clutch between the drive motor and the feed roller is slipping.
Both Simon Weaving and Mike Lane were very helpful in diagnosing the problem.
I got somebody to check that the feed roller was actually turning, which it was. However the alarm sounded about 5 seconds after starting each drill run, repeating every 30 seconds.
I checked the sensor distance from the magnet on the end on the feed roller shaft as Mike had suggested, but this made no difference.
Confident that the error was false, I was able to carry on drilling, until Weaving’s are able to come and check out the fault. However, I had to press the ‘OK’ button every 30 seconds to keep going.
No.
The only issue Ive had was my mag mounted hopper camera slid down into the feed roller and jammed it.

Had to drop nearly a ton of wheat seed out to find that 😂😂😂
 

Badshot

Member
Location
Kent
If anyone with the RDS isocan box wants cameras I can sort a kit out that works.
Not a huge amount of £££
The screen can run two cameras you can swap between.
I've this one on the back, and one in the hopper.

Not mag mounted now, bolted....😂😂😂😂
 

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Manny

Member
Mixed Farmer
Yes, me.
Address is is Glos, but actually in Warks. I’ve got a mounted GD3000M.
Why do you ask?
I’m between Moreton-in-Marsh, Shipston-on-Stour and Chipping Norton if you want to come and see how well it works.
Thank you for the reply, I was trying to find one near Stratford on Avon that we could try to plant a field of spring barley with but I have since planted it with the mzuri. The field is a very challenging bank and the limiting factor to our choose of drill. Not only to weather we can pull the drill on it but also down to the red marl, blue/grey clay and small patch of sand in one top corner that make up this massive 7ac field. I've been told the trailed drills drill in pairs of row across steep slopes so I wanted to try a mounted one. I may get in touch when I'm next heading down the fosse in your direction to see if I could call in and see how it working for you. Many thanks for the reply.
 

Badshot

Member
Location
Kent
Thank you for the reply, I was trying to find one near Stratford on Avon that we could try to plant a field of spring barley with but I have since planted it with the mzuri. The field is a very challenging bank and the limiting factor to our choose of drill. Not only to weather we can pull the drill on it but also down to the red marl, blue/grey clay and small patch of sand in one top corner that make up this massive 7ac field. I've been told the trailed drills drill in pairs of row across steep slopes so I wanted to try a mounted one. I may get in touch when I'm next heading down the fosse in your direction to see if I could call in and see how it working for you. Many thanks for the reply.
The mounteds will do that too.
I don't see it's an issue really, spacing will end up looking like a claydon/mzuri/DTS drilled it.
 

JoeHodgey

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
Hi,

We’re farming clay loam, medium textured fenland in Lincolnshire, not bad land, some heavy holes. We’re a year or two into direct drilling with our mounted 3m GD. Growing cover crops and cutting back on inputs. Has anyone else found that in these really dry spring we keep getting problems with no till spring barley?

What seems to happen is the top inch of soil bakes out like a patio slab in the dry. Seed chits but physically can’t get though the hard layer and actually U-turns back down. Establishment can be down to 50%. Establishment dramatically better where we have moved soil and cracked off that hard top.

Anyone else experienced this?

P.s I’m considering having a front mounted cross cutter disc and packer type machine made. For the option of very shallow cultivation, 20-30mm, to crack off said hard soil surface infront of the drill.
 

tr250

Member
Location
Northants
Hi,

We’re farming clay loam, medium textured fenland in Lincolnshire, not bad land, some heavy holes. We’re a year or two into direct drilling with our mounted 3m GD. Growing cover crops and cutting back on inputs. Has anyone else found that in these really dry spring we keep getting problems with no till spring barley?

What seems to happen is the top inch of soil bakes out like a patio slab in the dry. Seed chits but physically can’t get though the hard layer and actually U-turns back down. Establishment can be down to 50%. Establishment dramatically better where we have moved soil and cracked off that hard top.

Anyone else experienced this?

P.s I’m considering having a front mounted cross cutter disc and packer type machine made. For the option of very shallow cultivation, 20-30mm, to crack off said hard soil surface infront of the drill.
I’ve got 2 rules in spring. Don’t drill too deep and wait until the surface is hard enough for the soil to shear as the discs lift it so it doesn’t open again
E3BBAF2C-A6F5-471A-9394-03B7AF32372C.png
18B86B70-1380-4275-868A-1BDB18E89452.png
 

JoeHodgey

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
I’ve got 2 rules in spring. Don’t drill too deep and wait until the surface is hard enough for the soil to shear as the discs lift it so it doesn’t open again View attachment 1035937View attachment 1035938

thanks for the reply, looks good, is that not cultivated autumn or spring, completely no till? I drilled some spring barley for a neighbour who had a little Sandy field and establishment much better there.

We just drill what I consider normal depth, 25-30mm ish. We’ve just had bad results last year no till spring barley to be honest. I’m talking 2t/acre last harvest, where direct drilled and 3t/acre where we went over lightly with power harrow infront to level a few headlands and things. When we get rain though the top goes lovely and friable again, nearly dig a hole with your finger.
 

Badshot

Member
Location
Kent
I cocked up this spring.
Drilled when I thought it was ok.
It was a bit too wet, would have been fine for wheat in the autumn, then got a slug of rain soon after drilling.
This resulted in seed rotting in places, and the oats have struggled. Absolutely fine on the drier parts of the fields.
Lesson learned.
Patience.
 

JoeHodgey

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
Main advice then is wait for it to get good and dry? Goes against what you think in these dry springs. It seems to be the seed thrown under the soil flap that struggles not the seed in the bottom of the slot.
 

kiwi

Member
Hi,

We’re farming clay loam, medium textured fenland in Lincolnshire, not bad land, some heavy holes. We’re a year or two into direct drilling with our mounted 3m GD. Growing cover crops and cutting back on inputs. Has anyone else found that in these really dry spring we keep getting problems with no till spring barley?

What seems to happen is the top inch of soil bakes out like a patio slab in the dry. Seed chits but physically can’t get though the hard layer and actually U-turns back down. Establishment can be down to 50%. Establishment dramatically better where we have moved soil and cracked off that hard top.

Anyone else experienced this?

P.s I’m considering having a front mounted cross cutter disc and packer type machine made. For the option of very shallow cultivation, 20-30mm, to crack off said hard soil surface infront of the drill.
How do you terminate covercrops before drilling barley.? As in do you terminate close to drilling or allow covercrops to go brown or spray after drilling.
 

tr250

Member
Location
Northants
thanks for the reply, looks good, is that not cultivated autumn or spring, completely no till? I drilled some spring barley for a neighbour who had a little Sandy field and establishment much better there.

We just drill what I consider normal depth, 25-30mm ish. We’ve just had bad results last year no till spring barley to be honest. I’m talking 2t/acre last harvest, where direct drilled and 3t/acre where we went over lightly with power harrow infront to level a few headlands and things. When we get rain though the top goes lovely and friable again, nearly dig a hole with your finger.
100% no-till. Not been cultivated for 4 or 5 years. It was s wheat last year also drilled into cover crop then muck applied then grazed with in lamb ewe lambs and sprayed off beginning of feb
8636A9E9-BFEE-4E6E-9543-C3E762645AB4.png
871BA5F7-0357-41AA-A87B-B6FE1C38CB72.png
871BA5F7-0357-41AA-A87B-B6FE1C38CB72.png
0C9D7DC6-E51A-41F3-9649-B490BBE6D20A.jpeg
C88040A1-4D60-4F04-9A89-22C985E1FE71.jpeg
 

JoeHodgey

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
How do you terminate covercrops before drilling barley.? As in do you terminate close to drilling or allow covercrops to go brown or spray after drilling.
Mostly we spray off January time, way more moisture under green cover in March. Last year was virtually bare soil again by the time the drill went in. Green cover and moisture is a good thing post drilling but do have to be very patient to drill green in the spring.

I’m doing some intercropping trials too where I’ve had to double drill it with the two different seeds, noticeably better establishment there. Just down to and extra pass with the Drill, disc fracturing the top
 

Badshot

Member
Location
Kent
Mostly we spray off January time, way more moisture under green cover in March. Last year was virtually bare soil again by the time the drill went in. Green cover and moisture is a good thing post drilling but do have to be very patient to drill green in the spring.

I’m doing some intercropping trials too where I’ve had to double drill it with the two different seeds, noticeably better establishment there. Just down to and extra pass with the Drill, disc fracturing the top
I do cross drill small seeds.
It makes a fairly big difference to establishment.
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

Farm-safety-640x360.png
The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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