Weaving sabre tine user thread

Andrew K

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Essex
Bob, Have a look at a KRM sola 1909 coulter, it looks a similar width to the tine like your version. Placement is good in the slot.
i think you are on the right path, assuming big seed such as winter beans can flow freely?
 

Bob lincs

Member
Arable Farmer
Bob, Have a look at a KRM sola 1909 coulter, it looks a similar width to the tine like your version. Placement is good in the slot.
i think you are on the right path, assuming big seed such as winter beans can flow freely?
We don’t find the original tube a problem on beans as we’re running a lot deeper . These tubes are for wheat only as they are quite narrow and it’s the wheat that we want to try and get a little more uniform depth .
 

Andrew K

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Essex
We don’t find the original tube a problem on beans as we’re running a lot deeper . These tubes are for wheat only as they are quite narrow and it’s the wheat that we want to try and get a little more uniform depth .
Probably would be good on both though... How wide is the exit tubing roughly?
 

Andrew K

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Essex
12 mm but we could make them any width
Think you would probably want 15mm plus for winter beans? Just thinking aloud, but its always nice to not have to change tubes etc too often.I like your thinking though! We have adapted an LD4000 Weaving subsoiler for OSR and cover crops recently, and are experimenting with the std weaving tubes at the moment,hence my interest.
 

goodevans

Member
Could you weld a 'landslide" onto the back of the tine so it went under the seed tube to interrupt the seeds flow and stop it reaching the bottom of the slot ?
That would be breaching Tritons patent,it would be very interesting if Weavings had marketed the Triton
 

Bob lincs

Member
Arable Farmer
Think you would probably want 15mm plus for winter beans? Just thinking aloud, but its always nice to not have to change tubes etc too often.I like your thinking though! We have adapted an LD4000 Weaving subsoiler for OSR and cover crops recently, and are experimenting with the std weaving tubes at the moment,hence my interest.
I’m not to worried about changing the tubes as it’s quite a quick job . I have got one tube that we have pressed to a 5mm opening to see if it would flatten that much or split , I thought it would be good for OSR or small seeds .
 

JCfarmer

Member
Location
warks
No not with Weavings these are my own design . We find that having to run the tines deeper than we would like some seed does end up in the bottom but we’re hoping with these tubes the tine can be run shallower and it won’t be a problem .
Are you going to run the drill straight into undisturbed stubble when drilling the wheat?
 

JCfarmer

Member
Location
warks
I liked the sabretine as I thought the tine more often than not would run deeper than the actual seeding depth to create some sort of drainage channel and loosening for roots. I imagine this is more likely achieved in the autumn than the spring. Having the drill coulter/ tube tight to the back of the tine doesn't allow the soil enough time to fall back in unlike the Claydon which I appreciate is a different animal.
 

Tiptoe Ted

Member
Location
South East
Has anyone used a sabre tine to drill winter cereals after maize?

Assuming the foraging team doesn’t make too much of a mess, I am considering going straight in with the sabre tine to drill barley and rye.

My main concern is whether the drill will cope with the maize stalks and root balls without blocking, especially as mine is the plastic hopper 3 rows of tines model.

Any advice gratefully received!
 

sjt01

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
North Norfolk
Has anyone used a sabre tine to drill winter cereals after maize?

Assuming the foraging team doesn’t make too much of a mess, I am considering going straight in with the sabre tine to drill barley and rye.

My main concern is whether the drill will cope with the maize stalks and root balls without blocking, especially as mine is the plastic hopper 3 rows of tines model.

Any advice gratefully received!
We use the Sabre tine conversion of a KV cultivator that @Bob lincs made. Row spacing is wider than we would have chosen, but the results look good so far in its first season. It will even clear a small heap of maize stalks run down when opening out a headland. Weaving are taking back the Caddy and supplying a new front hopper to make us a bit more manoeverable.
This photo is actually cover crop going in, no photos of winter barley going in I am afraid
PHOTO-2020-10-14-15-40-38 - Copy.jpg


Winter beans put in under less than ideal conditions in a very wet autumn with the Sabre tine
IMG-20201223-WA0001.jpg
 

Tiptoe Ted

Member
Location
South East
We use the Sabre tine conversion of a KV cultivator that @Bob lincs made. Row spacing is wider than we would have chosen, but the results look good so far in its first season. It will even clear a small heap of maize stalks run down when opening out a headland. Weaving are taking back the Caddy and supplying a new front hopper to make us a bit more manoeverable.
This photo is actually cover crop going in, no photos of winter barley going in I am afraid
View attachment 959338

Winter beans put in under less than ideal conditions in a very wet autumn with the Sabre tine
View attachment 959339
Thanks - that is very reassuring. Beans look good. If it can cope with putting beans in quite deep, it should be ok with shallower cereals.
I was concerned with it ripping the stalks out but it looks like most of your stalks are still rooted which is ideal.
The closer rows on my drill may have an impact but hopefully not massively.

It all relies on an easy maize harvest and limited compaction from the trailers - am hoping to go to strip till maize next year to help carry the traffic.
May end up cultivating the headlands only this year which will show any difference in cereal establishment
 

Bomber101

Member
BASIS
Location
Trent, Dorset
We ploughed and power harrowed behind maize and followed (briefly) with our sabre tine this year. We aimed to do the maize like this as a mounted drill would cope if it was wetter. We failed! The loose maize stalks wrapped around the coulter and blocked the outlet within meters. Perhaps if we were going deeper then the counter opening would have been deeper and we would have coped. Perhaps we should have not cultivated but as a first timer after maize worried about fusarium - perhaps worried too much - so ploughing seemed sense. We did try and change the counter angle but I think we guessed wrong in our adjustments - we thought perhaps it was too loose and puffy and we should have adjusted for too much trash. We drilled it with the Vaderstad which worked fine as the disc cut through and it was dry enough but establishment is not as good as we would like. We drilled spring beans this spring into worked and rolled ground from the autumn. It worked really well and put the seed in deeper than we could with the Rapid so more thought needed this autumn after maize! We like the drill a lot but we need to work out where to use and when to get the most out of it.
 

Tiptoe Ted

Member
Location
South East
We ploughed and power harrowed behind maize and followed (briefly) with our sabre tine this year. We aimed to do the maize like this as a mounted drill would cope if it was wetter. We failed! The loose maize stalks wrapped around the coulter and blocked the outlet within meters. Perhaps if we were going deeper then the counter opening would have been deeper and we would have coped. Perhaps we should have not cultivated but as a first timer after maize worried about fusarium - perhaps worried too much - so ploughing seemed sense. We did try and change the counter angle but I think we guessed wrong in our adjustments - we thought perhaps it was too loose and puffy and we should have adjusted for too much trash. We drilled it with the Vaderstad which worked fine as the disc cut through and it was dry enough but establishment is not as good as we would like. We drilled spring beans this spring into worked and rolled ground from the autumn. It worked really well and put the seed in deeper than we could with the Rapid so more thought needed this autumn after maize! We like the drill a lot but we need to work out where to use and when to get the most out of it.
I drilled wheat with the sabre tine last year into maize ground that had been cultivated once with the joker with tine bar. Had a few issues with maize stalks and root balls not flowing very well but managed to get it done and looks good now.
So, it’s a tricky one as I felt I had to cultivate to take harvest compaction out but that inevitably leaves loose trash on top. Possible solution is strip till maize to hopefully reduce compaction and hence need to cultivate. Then I reckon the sabre tine would be fine straight in to maize stubble 👍
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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