What dairy foot trimming crush

Location
West Wales
i am in the market for a new trimming crush. Money is most definitely an object but don’t want to get it wrong.

What have others gone for? What can’t you live without? And what wasn’t worth the extra?

Suggestions of makes much appreciated
 
I'm pleased with this. It's quite good and quite cheap
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Dead Rabbits

Member
Location
'Merica
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We have the rusted out beat up version of this. I don’t think I’ve ever cussed a piece of equipment so much. Beats tying feet up on the rotary though.
 
i am in the market for a new trimming crush. Money is most definitely an object but don’t want to get it wrong.

What have others gone for? What can’t you live without? And what wasn’t worth the extra?

Suggestions of makes much appreciated

Buy once........... buy right. (y)
I know i will never need another crush. It does everything i could ask for perfectly.
 

Jackov Altraids

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Devon
Agree, its the same with people saying "future proof" who knows what the future holds.

Just buy the best you can comfortably afford.

It is a difficult balance with these type of items which are replaced infrequently.
You can rue trying to save a few quid for a lifetime of making a job more difficult than it needs to be or have a long remembered white elephant of some expensive option you've never used.
The best thing you can do is get advice from your peers' experience.
I fear this thread has failed to help the OP in this respect so far.
 

Splitpin

Member
Location
Devon
@Headless chicken
To my mind the hoofcare one above Is good value for money and will do everything you want it to do. I’ve got the same one and front feet are easy once you get the nack of putting the rope around, it has the anti kick bar which ok is manual but you still won’t get a cow move her foot once it’s down. Self lock yolk works well , buttons for winches are to hand and not a hint that it might turn over
 

jimmer

Member
Location
East Devon
If your going to lift 100 cows a year, and get a trimmer in to blitz the whole herd, something like beefys etc is wholly adequate
If you have hundreds to do a year sometimes twice and the time and skill to do them then go all out on a super duper jobby
Most people have issues with doing front feet, don't fall into the trap of over speccing just to make doing fronts easier when in reality probably only 10 percent will get them lifted anyway
I spent 200 quid at a farm sale on a manual jobby, perfect for back feet, but will admit that if I was doing a lot I would prefer a bit of automation
 
It's a job that just has to be done, and can be a pretty horrible job if you can't do it half safely or without feeling like you've done 12 rounds of a boxing match. If you've got a dozen or more to do at what point is your back going to be saying that's enough?

Foot trimmer if fine, especially if he's in once a week but that's not really a option if you only have a small herd. It's what happens when you have a couple limping cows a couple days after he's been? maybe a cheaper crush will suffice then. I read a few weeks ago a lame cow needs to be treated as a emergency to get the quickest successful outcome.
I couldn't help get the feeling that too many trimmers are in too much of a rush these days. I've seen invoices for 4 figures for a foot trimmers days work. blocks falling off 10 yards down the yard etc. Those cows that had been picked out lame but actually need very little trimming, just needed a quick spray or gel and wrap that a trimmer would gladly charge a tenner for.

if your going to do the lot yourself then i'll stand by my first post. If your just going to do the odd one then cheaper will be fine.
 
Location
cumbria
I agree deciding how and when is as important as crush type.

Mine linked above is a 20 cow/day machine really.
Which is perfect for me, doing weekly dry off trims at the moment.

Someone at headless's scale could even buy two and use 3 staff, 2 to trim and 1 to assist.
Easily be a 50 cow between milkings when needed and then a one man set up for as and when.
Or even have one on each farm. Then combine them when needed.
All for around £3k. With no motors or electrics to go wrong.

And in my defence he did say money is an object.
 

eulb

Member
I agree deciding how and when is as important as crush type.

Mine linked above is a 20 cow/day machine really.
Which is perfect for me, doing weekly dry off trims at the moment.

Someone at headless's scale could even buy two and use 3 staff, 2 to trim and 1 to assist.
Easily be a 50 cow between milkings when needed and then a one man set up for as and when.
Or even have one on each farm. Then combine them when needed.
All for around £3k. With no motors or electrics to go wrong.

And in my defence he did say money is an object.

The rear feet look to to be very low,I couldn’t use it.
 

Is Red tractor detrimental to your mental health?

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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