What does Red Tractor cost you in cash terms?

manhill

Member
I suppose some chemicals need more accurate application. The ones I use have a range for the type of crop. Wouldn't like to apply more of less than amount needed so I'm 'self calibrating'. It's in my interest. I can overspray with a calibrated sprayer just as easily as I can with non calibrated one. I can under spray, over spray, double spray with either but I wouldn't want to do that. I would change a nozzle that was causing t he wrong fan pattern, that's just common sense.
Nah, don't need a calibration certificate! (Run, duck and hide!).
 

Brisel

Member
NFFN Member
Location
North Yorkshire
The problem is, a minority are not so diligent and that's why we have regulation at the expense of the professional majority who see a correctly working spryer as good business sense.
 

DrWazzock

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
I suppose some chemicals need more accurate application. The ones I use have a range for the type of crop. Wouldn't like to apply more of less than amount needed so I'm 'self calibrating'. It's in my interest. I can overspray with a calibrated sprayer just as easily as I can with non calibrated one. I can under spray, over spray, double spray with either but I wouldn't want to do that. I would change a nozzle that was causing t he wrong fan pattern, that's just common sense.
Nah, don't need a calibration certificate! (Run, duck and hide!).
That’s the best way in practice. The jug test is never as good as seeing how many litres you have actually applied to a known area. Same with the fert spinner. I have used the same machine for 21 years. You know from experience where to set it as you have years of records. No need to mess about in the yard with a bucket under it revving the nuts off it doing nothing, except maybe occasionally for a new product.
 

manhill

Member
What I would like to know is how damaging a bad nozzle can be , worst case say, dripping instead of spraying. Some leaves get more concentration of pesticide than others. Will somebody eating those leaves have a higher risk of cancer? If so, why are we spraying anyway?
What I'm trying to establish is whether the extra precision is really necessary or is it more for public relations.
 

Steevo

Member
Location
Gloucestershire
What I would like to know is how damaging a bad nozzle can be , worst case say, dripping instead of spraying. Some leaves get more concentration of pesticide than others. Will somebody eating those leaves have a higher risk of cancer? If so, why are we spraying anyway?
What I'm trying to establish is whether the extra precision is really necessary or is it more for public relations.

At the end of a run, or in a triangular piece plenty of crop gets double dosed. It doesn’t mean it’s harmful though.

Some nozzles will drip once the sprayer is turned off too.
 

DrWazzock

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
What I would like to know is how damaging a bad nozzle can be , worst case say, dripping instead of spraying. Some leaves get more concentration of pesticide than others. Will somebody eating those leaves have a higher risk of cancer? If so, why are we spraying anyway?
What I'm trying to establish is whether the extra precision is really necessary or is it more for public relations.
It’s public relations. I mean we are about to dump 40 litres of the product on the crop and folk are worried about a slight leak or something. They need to get a life.
 

An Gof

Member
Location
Cornwall
No doubt I'll be shot down for being gullible, but I've been told by several inspectors that they find sprayers with different sized nozzles on the booms. When they drive into the yard and there is rubbish everywhere and nettles growing through the sprayer, they know it won't take long to find something they will fail on. I've seen some very ropey sprayers with NSTS stickers on when contracting - leaks, blocked nozzles, lots of boom movement. I didn't look at the date on the sticker but did wonder how that would ever pass.

I have 3 different sized nozzles on my sprayer boom like many farmers. They are on a triplex rotational nozzle body. Sometimes its important to qualify statements ;)
 

DrWazzock

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
At the end of a run, or in a triangular piece plenty of crop gets double dosed. It doesn’t mean it’s harmful though.

Some nozzles will drip once the sprayer is turned off too.
There is always one DCV that will drip. The weakest. It’s unavoidable. You are containing pressure in the lines, it is acting as a weepy relief valve as the hoses flex and move. Only way round would be to vent the lines but my basic sprayer doesn’t do that.
 

spin cycle

Member
Location
north norfolk
These costs are pretty universal wethe you farm 100 or a 1000 acres so it penalises us small farmers even more.none of us know the cost to our health though.
nick...

i didn't care about the financial cost

i left cos it was ruining my mental health....worrying about complying this/that.....others i reckon tick boxes and move on

my sprayer once went wrong the day after it's mot...i reckon the pressure test weakened a diaphragm

i need a vet on farm at least once every year otherwise you won't get AB...fair enough

one day mental health will become a H&S issue and we'll be able to sue RT's arse
 

Brisel

Member
NFFN Member
Location
North Yorkshire
I have 3 different sized nozzles on my sprayer boom like many farmers. They are on a triplex rotational nozzle body. Sometimes its important to qualify statements ;)

You have to be awkward, don’t you? 😏

The sprayers I saw had no way of having the same sizes regardless of multi nozzle holders. That was day one in a new job in Dorset 10 years ago. Nor was that the only time I’ve seen that on a NSTS stickered sprayer either.
 
What I would like to know is how damaging a bad nozzle can be , worst case say, dripping instead of spraying. Some leaves get more concentration of pesticide than others. Will somebody eating those leaves have a higher risk of cancer? If so, why are we spraying anyway?
What I'm trying to establish is whether the extra precision is really necessary or is it more for public relations.


I thought concerns about pesticide residue in harvested crops was down to timing before you harvest.

The relevant growth stage of the crop is listed, which also can state both the time to leave before sowing and harvesting crops.

That's going to relate directly to the way the chemicals degrade .. for example Glysophate degrades quickly when it touches soil but not so fast on the plant.
 
No doubt I'll be shot down for being gullible, but I've been told by several inspectors that they find sprayers with different sized nozzles on the booms. When they drive into the yard and there is rubbish everywhere and nettles growing through the sprayer, they know it won't take long to find something they will fail on. I've seen some very ropey sprayers with NSTS stickers on when contracting - leaks, blocked nozzles, lots of boom movement. I didn't look at the date on the sticker but did wonder how that would ever pass.


If RT is so great, then why aren't Chemicals audited to ensure what buy actually works ?
 

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The AHDB Planting and Variety Survey provides the earliest view of the planted area for the upcoming harvest in the United Kingdom (UK).​


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The information can be used to shape the domestic market and trade and assist levy payers in their marketing decisions. It will detail regional differences of cropping across the UK, which will help...
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