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What is it? Seen on a walk.

Discussion in 'Classic Machinery' started by Red Fred, May 6, 2018.

  1. Red Fred

    Red Fred Member

    While we were out for a walk enjoying the sunshine, we noticed this in the edge of a wood by the footpath and I wondered what it was. I was thinking it might be an old horse-gear for driving an elevator, but didn't want to disturb it as it was on NT property and I didn't want to meddle with it. It was made by the well known John Wallis Titt of Warminster who were famed for their wind pumps, so it might be one of those. IMG_5324.JPG IMG_5325.JPG IMG_5326.JPG
     
  2. Dry Rot

    Dry Rot Member

    Location:
    Scotland
    Horse power for driving machinery. Looks as if this one is broken.

    On my uncle's farm, there was a building called 'the round house' for obvious reasons (it was round?!). In former days, it housed a machine like this.

    A horse would be harnessed to pull a shaft around a central geared pivot and the power fed off through a shaft to gears, belts, and pulleys to drive various farm machines.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. renewablejohn

    renewablejohn Member

    Location:
    lancs
    I am looking for one of these in working order as I have the anchor stone and horse ring which powered the loomshop.
     
  4. Dry Rot

    Dry Rot Member

    Location:
    Scotland
    Easy enough to construct similar using scrap car parts. Half a rear axle and the PTO.
     
  5. andybk

    andybk Member

    Location:
    Mendips Somerset
    i think the beauty is in the originality, the one in the op would look nice painted up in a courtyard or similar , the overengineered cast is a sure touch of history
     
  6. renewablejohn

    renewablejohn Member

    Location:
    lancs
    Dont think something Heath Robinson would be appreciated on a Grade 2 listed building.
     
  7. Ley253

    Ley253 Member

    Location:
    Bath
    I dont think so, you would need a very large crown wheel to get the gearing anything like right. In the area of a three foot diameter.
    I think the one in the photo is complete, the shoe which at first seems broken may well be complete, the ends seem to be too clean for a break, and the bolt holes for the wooden shaft used to link it to the horse are still there.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2018
    Dry Rot and Red Fred like this.
  8. Red Fred

    Red Fred Member

    I think I'll get on to the NT and tell them what it is. It will only get pikeyed away for scrap otherwise and it might as well go on show at the local museum so everyone can see it.
     
  9. Ley253

    Ley253 Member

    Location:
    Bath
    Difficult one. As its not stone and brick, I wouldn't trust the NT with it, they would be likely to flog it for scrap to fund some diversity project or other.
     
    trimmer tony likes this.
  10. 8100

    8100 Member

    Location:
    South Cheshire
    They showed one in use at Acton Scot on the Edwardian/Victorian Farm tv series .I am trying find some video but you can see it in this picture..
    upload_2018-5-13_13-54-11.jpeg
     
  11. renewablejohn

    renewablejohn Member

    Location:
    lancs
    You could say you know someone looking for one on a grade 2 listed site who already has the cobbled ring and anchor stone.
     

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