What! No one read the Telegraph this morning?

DaveGrohl

Member
Location
Cumbria
Really helpful and balanced three page piece (The great plant based con). Just the type of thing many on here have been hoping would be published.
Presumably the article is referring to the book by Jayne Buxton that’s being released any day now? I ordered it a few days ago.

Maybe you could post a picture of said article to back up your opening question? Instead of wondering why no one else (who don’t get the Telegraph) has bothered to do it?
 

steveR

Member
Mixed Farmer
Presumably the article is referring to the book by Jayne Buxton that’s being released any day now? I ordered it a few days ago.

Maybe you could post a picture of said article to back up your opening question? Instead of wondering why no one else (who don’t get the Telegraph) has bothered to do it?
 
Presumably the article is referring to the book by Jayne Buxton that’s being released any day now? I ordered it a few days ago.

Maybe you could post a picture of said article to back up your opening question? Instead of wondering why no one else (who don’t get the Telegraph) has bothered to do it?
I subscribe to the Telegraph on line, and I could not find an article called "the great plant based con"
 
but did find this, which was interesting highlighted the interesting bit by the way (half way down)

The eating habits we need to bring back from the 1950s​

As we approach the Jubilee and look back to the time of the Coronation, we were slimmer and healthier back then – here’s why...

ByBoudicca Fox-Leonard30 May 2022 • 5:00am

1950s diet vs today

In the 1950s, if families ate treats, such as cake and biscuits, they would most likely have been homemade CREDIT: H. Armstrong Roberts
When Elizabeth was crowned Queen on June 2, 1953, sugar, butter, cheese, margarine, cooking fats and meat were all rationed.
Fortunately, sweets, eggs and cream had come off ration in February, March and April respectively, so there was surely a trifle or two to be had at a street party. Sugar, though, did not come off ration until September that year.
For a time of jubilation, it was by modern standards a fairly dismal diet, reliant on potatoes and without any of the exotic ingredients we take for granted. It was a simpler time, when olive oil was only sold in small bottles from the chemist, to loosen ear wax.
Now 70 years on, we have more choice than you can shake a chopstick at. We’re also facing an obesity epidemic that would be inconceivable to an average 1950s family.

Cancer Research UK estimates more than 21 million UK adults will be obese by 2040 (almost 36 per cent of the adult population). The number of people living with diabetes has hit an all-time high reaching over 4.9 million. According to Diabetes UK 13.6m people are now at increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Compare that with the 1960s when only one per cent of men and two per cent of women had diabetes.

And yet when meat and all other food rationing ended in Britain in June 1954, it left the nation fitter than it had been previously.
Sections of society who had a poor diet previously had seen an increase in their intake of protein and vitamins because they received the same rations as everybody else. Pregnant women and children were also granted additional eggs, milk, and other items to keep them strong and healthy. For instance, post-war four-year-olds had higher calcium and iron intakes through bread and milk consumption and ate and drank less sugar overall than children today.
By 2015 retailers were selling food in bigger packages – with the average supermarket pizza increasing from 200g to more than 250g in the last two decades

By 2015 retailers were selling food in bigger packages – with the average supermarket pizza increasing from 200g to more than 250g in the last two decades CREDIT: Imgorthand
The world has been getting taller in the decades since, thanks to better nutrition; the average height in the UK rose by 3.9in (10cm) during the 20th century. In 1957 the average woman was 5ft 2in, compared with 5ft 5in today.
Yet according to numbers from 2017 she is also 20lb heavier (154 vs.136lb) and wears a larger-size clothing (size 14 today vs. size 10 in 1957).
It’s clear though from rising obesity levels that somewhere we’ve tipped the scales from healthy to not so. Are there lessons we can learn from a Jubilee diet?
According to food historian Dr Annie Gray, the general culture lent itself to better fitness and health. “Plates were smaller. Snacking didn’t happen all day,” says Gray. “Alcohol consumption was far less too.”
Meat consumption was less than today. Meals were bulked out with oats, pulses and bread – brown bread became the norm; the National Loaf introduced in 1942, was made from wholemeal flour to combat wartime shortages of white flour.
The ration diet wasn’t about starvation; men were allowed 3,000 calories a day – slightly higher than the 2,500 recommended today. In many ways, a 1950s diet can seem counterintuitive. “There were biscuits, cakes and sugar,” says Gray. “The difference is that today we eat sugar in more insidious ways.”
People however were still consuming less sugar than we do. Even when rationing finished and everyone went crazy for sugar, many of the habits of the war were very ingrained. “It was still about not wasting food and using whatever you had. And also walking places. All of that was part and parcel of people’s lives,” says Gray
Today we need to be reminded to walk 10,000 steps, something that wouldn’t need saying in 1953. The proportion of households with access to a car has risen from 14 per cent in 1951 to 75 per cent in 2010.
Dinner in the 1950s would have been cooked from scratch, rather than delivered or out at a restaurant

Dinner in the 1950s would have been cooked from scratch, rather than delivered or out at a restaurant CREDIT: www.bridgemanimages.com
Unsurprisingly then, few people skipped breakfast. Typically it was bacon and eggs. “Only 20 per cent of the population were having breakfast cereal in 1956,” says Gray. “We know that cereals generally speaking are pretty awful. Most are high in sugar, salt and fat.”
For the workers, there was no Pret sandwich al desko. “Sixty per cent of people went home for lunch in the lower classes,” says Gray.
When she was writing the Call the Midlife Cook Book, Gray would have a two-course lunch typical of the era. “Sausages and something like a rice pudding. And as long as you have small portions it feels like a massive meal.”
Dinner in the 1950s would have been cooked from scratch, rather than delivered or out at a restaurant. Meals took place around a dining table. Contrast with today, where approximately five per cent between the ages of 45 to 54, of a 2021 Statista survey, said they ate with family at the dinner table only once a month.
Mindless eating with your various screens wouldn’t have been an option given that in 1953 there were only 2.7 million television sets in existence.
“One of the things that is quite good about a 1950s meal is paying attention to what you’re eating and stopping when you’re full,” says Gray. It’s one of the many lessons she says we can learn from a 1950s diet. Eating proper food and making healthy decisions
For bariatric surgeon Andrew Jenkinson, author of Why We Eat (Too Much), his concern is what we’re eating, not how much.
“It’s nothing to do with calories,” he says. “You can eat a lot of healthy foods, such as meat, fish and vegetables with high calories without it translating into weight gain. It’s what the food does to you from a metabolic perspective. The western diet has too many refined carbohydrates that affect your insulin levels and cause inflammation. It’s not the fact that it’s really tasty, it’s the fact it disrupts the metabolic signalling, causing weight gain.”

Many cereals are high in sugar, salt and fat

Many cereals are high in sugar, salt and fat CREDIT: EyeEm
In his book, he praises a Victorian diet. A 1950s ration diet wouldn’t have been much different. “There wasn’t access to refined carbohydrates in the form of processed bread, pasta, shop-bought cakes and biscuits. We also didn’t have the profusion of vegetable oils, which in my opinion, with the exception of good olive oil, are the most artificial foods that cause major distortion to our metabolism.
We’ve introduced a Deliveroo culture. Restaurant food will tend to add sugar, salt and veg oils to make it tasty so we go back and have more.” Even the treats of the 1950s, such as cakes and biscuits, are more likely today to be shop bought and have shelf-life lengthening palm oil in them.
The point where it all went wrong, he says, was the 1980s when saturated fats were wrongly demonised, and cereals replaced eggs as a healthy breakfast.
“The big scare that saturated fats caused cardiac disease, which has been proven to be not reliable evidence, unfortunately, meant the the western world went towards more refined carbohydrates.”
His fear is that we still don’t fully understand its effect on our bodies. While not everyone becomes obese on snacks and junk food there has been an increase in other western diseases.

“Asthma, IBS, arthritis, autoimmune diseases and allergies, they all come because we don’t really understand what this new food does to our bodies,” says Jenkinson.
Much of the problem is that junk food is frequently cheaper than healthy food. As a society we also spend far less on food than we did in the 1950s; food shopping took up one-third of the average income, compared with around 16 per cent today.
Jenkinson is not advocating rolling back the clock. Rather we take the time to consider what unhealthy habits we have that we could give a 1950s makeover. But with a modern sensibility, making use of spices and knowledge from other cuisines.
“We are now in a position where we can cook really delicious foods in our own kitchens. More than ever we can actually lose a lot of weight and have a great quality of life and nutrition.”
 

DaveGrohl

Member
Location
Cumbria
but did find this, which was interesting highlighted the interesting bit by the way (half way down)

The eating habits we need to bring back from the 1950s​

As we approach the Jubilee and look back to the time of the Coronation, we were slimmer and healthier back then – here’s why...

ByBoudicca Fox-Leonard30 May 2022 • 5:00am

1950s diet vs today

In the 1950s, if families ate treats, such as cake and biscuits, they would most likely have been homemade CREDIT: H. Armstrong Roberts
When Elizabeth was crowned Queen on June 2, 1953, sugar, butter, cheese, margarine, cooking fats and meat were all rationed.
Fortunately, sweets, eggs and cream had come off ration in February, March and April respectively, so there was surely a trifle or two to be had at a street party. Sugar, though, did not come off ration until September that year.
For a time of jubilation, it was by modern standards a fairly dismal diet, reliant on potatoes and without any of the exotic ingredients we take for granted. It was a simpler time, when olive oil was only sold in small bottles from the chemist, to loosen ear wax.
Now 70 years on, we have more choice than you can shake a chopstick at. We’re also facing an obesity epidemic that would be inconceivable to an average 1950s family.

Cancer Research UK estimates more than 21 million UK adults will be obese by 2040 (almost 36 per cent of the adult population). The number of people living with diabetes has hit an all-time high reaching over 4.9 million. According to Diabetes UK 13.6m people are now at increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Compare that with the 1960s when only one per cent of men and two per cent of women had diabetes.

And yet when meat and all other food rationing ended in Britain in June 1954, it left the nation fitter than it had been previously.
Sections of society who had a poor diet previously had seen an increase in their intake of protein and vitamins because they received the same rations as everybody else. Pregnant women and children were also granted additional eggs, milk, and other items to keep them strong and healthy. For instance, post-war four-year-olds had higher calcium and iron intakes through bread and milk consumption and ate and drank less sugar overall than children today.
By 2015 retailers were selling food in bigger packages – with the average supermarket pizza increasing from 200g to more than 250g in the last two decades

By 2015 retailers were selling food in bigger packages – with the average supermarket pizza increasing from 200g to more than 250g in the last two decades CREDIT: Imgorthand
The world has been getting taller in the decades since, thanks to better nutrition; the average height in the UK rose by 3.9in (10cm) during the 20th century. In 1957 the average woman was 5ft 2in, compared with 5ft 5in today.
Yet according to numbers from 2017 she is also 20lb heavier (154 vs.136lb) and wears a larger-size clothing (size 14 today vs. size 10 in 1957).
It’s clear though from rising obesity levels that somewhere we’ve tipped the scales from healthy to not so. Are there lessons we can learn from a Jubilee diet?
According to food historian Dr Annie Gray, the general culture lent itself to better fitness and health. “Plates were smaller. Snacking didn’t happen all day,” says Gray. “Alcohol consumption was far less too.”
Meat consumption was less than today. Meals were bulked out with oats, pulses and bread – brown bread became the norm; the National Loaf introduced in 1942, was made from wholemeal flour to combat wartime shortages of white flour.
The ration diet wasn’t about starvation; men were allowed 3,000 calories a day – slightly higher than the 2,500 recommended today. In many ways, a 1950s diet can seem counterintuitive. “There were biscuits, cakes and sugar,” says Gray. “The difference is that today we eat sugar in more insidious ways.”
People however were still consuming less sugar than we do. Even when rationing finished and everyone went crazy for sugar, many of the habits of the war were very ingrained. “It was still about not wasting food and using whatever you had. And also walking places. All of that was part and parcel of people’s lives,” says Gray
Today we need to be reminded to walk 10,000 steps, something that wouldn’t need saying in 1953. The proportion of households with access to a car has risen from 14 per cent in 1951 to 75 per cent in 2010.
Dinner in the 1950s would have been cooked from scratch, rather than delivered or out at a restaurant

Dinner in the 1950s would have been cooked from scratch, rather than delivered or out at a restaurant CREDIT: www.bridgemanimages.com
Unsurprisingly then, few people skipped breakfast. Typically it was bacon and eggs. “Only 20 per cent of the population were having breakfast cereal in 1956,” says Gray. “We know that cereals generally speaking are pretty awful. Most are high in sugar, salt and fat.”
For the workers, there was no Pret sandwich al desko. “Sixty per cent of people went home for lunch in the lower classes,” says Gray.
When she was writing the Call the Midlife Cook Book, Gray would have a two-course lunch typical of the era. “Sausages and something like a rice pudding. And as long as you have small portions it feels like a massive meal.”
Dinner in the 1950s would have been cooked from scratch, rather than delivered or out at a restaurant. Meals took place around a dining table. Contrast with today, where approximately five per cent between the ages of 45 to 54, of a 2021 Statista survey, said they ate with family at the dinner table only once a month.
Mindless eating with your various screens wouldn’t have been an option given that in 1953 there were only 2.7 million television sets in existence.
“One of the things that is quite good about a 1950s meal is paying attention to what you’re eating and stopping when you’re full,” says Gray. It’s one of the many lessons she says we can learn from a 1950s diet. Eating proper food and making healthy decisions
For bariatric surgeon Andrew Jenkinson, author of Why We Eat (Too Much), his concern is what we’re eating, not how much.
“It’s nothing to do with calories,” he says. “You can eat a lot of healthy foods, such as meat, fish and vegetables with high calories without it translating into weight gain. It’s what the food does to you from a metabolic perspective. The western diet has too many refined carbohydrates that affect your insulin levels and cause inflammation. It’s not the fact that it’s really tasty, it’s the fact it disrupts the metabolic signalling, causing weight gain.”

Many cereals are high in sugar, salt and fat

Many cereals are high in sugar, salt and fat CREDIT: EyeEm
In his book, he praises a Victorian diet. A 1950s ration diet wouldn’t have been much different. “There wasn’t access to refined carbohydrates in the form of processed bread, pasta, shop-bought cakes and biscuits. We also didn’t have the profusion of vegetable oils, which in my opinion, with the exception of good olive oil, are the most artificial foods that cause major distortion to our metabolism.
We’ve introduced a Deliveroo culture. Restaurant food will tend to add sugar, salt and veg oils to make it tasty so we go back and have more.” Even the treats of the 1950s, such as cakes and biscuits, are more likely today to be shop bought and have shelf-life lengthening palm oil in them.
The point where it all went wrong, he says, was the 1980s when saturated fats were wrongly demonised, and cereals replaced eggs as a healthy breakfast.
“The big scare that saturated fats caused cardiac disease, which has been proven to be not reliable evidence, unfortunately, meant the the western world went towards more refined carbohydrates.”
His fear is that we still don’t fully understand its effect on our bodies. While not everyone becomes obese on snacks and junk food there has been an increase in other western diseases.

“Asthma, IBS, arthritis, autoimmune diseases and allergies, they all come because we don’t really understand what this new food does to our bodies,” says Jenkinson.
Much of the problem is that junk food is frequently cheaper than healthy food. As a society we also spend far less on food than we did in the 1950s; food shopping took up one-third of the average income, compared with around 16 per cent today.
Jenkinson is not advocating rolling back the clock. Rather we take the time to consider what unhealthy habits we have that we could give a 1950s makeover. But with a modern sensibility, making use of spices and knowledge from other cuisines.
“We are now in a position where we can cook really delicious foods in our own kitchens. More than ever we can actually lose a lot of weight and have a great quality of life and nutrition.”
There also seems to be a story tody about an egg a day boosting HDL "cholesterol", any chance you could provide that too please?
 

An egg a day keeps the doctor away by boosting ‘good cholesterol’​

Daily consumption can help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease or stroke

ByTelegraph Reporters5 June 2022 • 2:56pm

Eating an egg every day can boost “good cholesterol”, a study has found.
It leads to more “good” HDL, or high-density lipoprotein, cholesterol which strips the “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) away, epidemiologists at Peking University found.
This can help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease or stroke.
Dr Lang Pan, first author, said: “Few studies have looked at the role plasma cholesterol metabolism plays in the association between egg consumption and the risk of cardiovascular diseases. We wanted to help address this gap.”
The findings are based on 4,778 people in China, of whom 3,401 had cardiovascular disease.

‘Moderate consumption’ protects against clots and hypertension​

Blood samples showed those who consumed a moderate amount of eggs had greater levels of APOA1 (apolipoprotein A1), a building-block of “good cholesterol”.
In particular, they had more large HDL molecules which help clear the “bad cholesterol” from arteries and blood vessels, thereby protecting against clots and hypertension. This prevents blockages that cut blood flow to major organs, including the heart and brain.
The scientists also identified 14 metabolites, or proteins, linked to heart disease.
Participants who ate fewer eggs had lower levels of beneficial proteins and higher levels of harmful ones compared to those who ate them more regularly.

More studies needed​

Professor Canqing Yu said: “Together, our results provide a potential explanation for how eating a moderate amount of eggs can help protect against heart disease.
“More studies are needed to verify the causal roles that lipid metabolites play in the association between egg consumption and the risk of cardiovascular disease.”
The researchers used a technique called targeted nuclear magnetic resonance to measure 225 metabolites in plasma - 24 of which were associated with self-reported levels of egg consumption.
The NHS currently advises eggs are a good choice as part of a healthy, balanced diet, while the British Heart Foundation has said eating them should no longer be seen as a health risk.
The results were published in the journal eLife.
 
Just read the headline article and it hits the nail on the head. Basically veganism is a guilt free way of saving or in this case not saving the planet. No planes, less consuming in general is much to hard to stomach for the majority. Discussed John Harvey Kellogg in the 19th century having a vested interest in a carbohydrate Rich diet that we all live by today. Same as the likes of nestle behind this fake meat crap.
 

DaveGrohl

Member
Location
Cumbria

An egg a day keeps the doctor away by boosting ‘good cholesterol’​

Daily consumption can help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease or stroke

ByTelegraph Reporters5 June 2022 • 2:56pm

Eating an egg every day can boost “good cholesterol”, a study has found.
It leads to more “good” HDL, or high-density lipoprotein, cholesterol which strips the “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) away, epidemiologists at Peking University found.
This can help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease or stroke.
Dr Lang Pan, first author, said: “Few studies have looked at the role plasma cholesterol metabolism plays in the association between egg consumption and the risk of cardiovascular diseases. We wanted to help address this gap.”
The findings are based on 4,778 people in China, of whom 3,401 had cardiovascular disease.

‘Moderate consumption’ protects against clots and hypertension​

Blood samples showed those who consumed a moderate amount of eggs had greater levels of APOA1 (apolipoprotein A1), a building-block of “good cholesterol”.
In particular, they had more large HDL molecules which help clear the “bad cholesterol” from arteries and blood vessels, thereby protecting against clots and hypertension. This prevents blockages that cut blood flow to major organs, including the heart and brain.
The scientists also identified 14 metabolites, or proteins, linked to heart disease.
Participants who ate fewer eggs had lower levels of beneficial proteins and higher levels of harmful ones compared to those who ate them more regularly.

More studies needed​

Professor Canqing Yu said: “Together, our results provide a potential explanation for how eating a moderate amount of eggs can help protect against heart disease.
“More studies are needed to verify the causal roles that lipid metabolites play in the association between egg consumption and the risk of cardiovascular disease.”
The researchers used a technique called targeted nuclear magnetic resonance to measure 225 metabolites in plasma - 24 of which were associated with self-reported levels of egg consumption.
The NHS currently advises eggs are a good choice as part of a healthy, balanced diet, while the British Heart Foundation has said eating them should no longer be seen as a health risk.
The results were published in the journal eLife.
Thanks. Epidemiologists…. urgh. Still, it’s not a bad news story, even though it’s not exactly news.
 
Why would anyone buy a newspaper, especially a big expensive broadsheet when they still have 200 old copies of the FW from days gone by and it lights the fire just perfect?

I do like the line about 'asthma, allergies, IBS, autoimmune diseases' etc I'm not entirely sure these weren't a thing in the 1950's mind. The tools to diagnose them probably didn't exist or they were conditions we didn't fully understand perhaps.

I think the main issue with food today is how highly calorific and processed much of it is. I can eat an entire big mac meal- way over 1000 calories with the same ease as I eat a banana. Unfortunately I can usually still taste it for longer than it keeps me from feeling hungry again. I don't do fast food like this any longer as it's just utter bilge.
 
Why would anyone buy a newspaper, especially a big expensive broadsheet when they still have 200 old copies of the FW from days gone by and it lights the fire just perfect?

I do like the line about 'asthma, allergies, IBS, autoimmune diseases' etc I'm not entirely sure these weren't a thing in the 1950's mind. The tools to diagnose them probably didn't exist or they were conditions we didn't fully understand perhaps.

I think the main issue with food today is how highly calorific and processed much of it is. I can eat an entire big mac meal- way over 1000 calories with the same ease as I eat a banana. Unfortunately I can usually still taste it for longer than it keeps me from feeling hungry again. I don't do fast food like this any longer as it's just utter bilge.
If the cat has diahorrea ???
 

Is Red tractor detrimental to your mental health?

  • Yes, Red tractor increase my stress and anxiety

    Votes: 284 98.3%
  • No, Red tractor gives me peace of mind that the product I produce is safe to enter the food chain

    Votes: 5 1.7%

HSENI names new farm safety champions

  • 117
  • 0
Written by William Kellett from Agriland

Farm-safety-640x360.png
The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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