What's hurting these radishes

juke

Member
Location
DURHAM
Got some radishes in a cover crop in one field that aren't looking to healthy would anyone have any idea from these photos what the problem could be.

The field is following wheat , last autumn was treated with pico stomp and in the spring with palio .. p n k were all good in spring testing , has had compost prior to drilling at 25/hectare as have other cover cropped fields none of those showing any issues only difference is this field has had well rotted horse muck on it ..
 

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Will 1594

Member
Arable Farmer
Got same symptoms ,,su damage is crop taking residue up , as it’s been so dry ,straw was removed and we ploughed it ,as had crop failure with stubble turnips last year ,ours is in a low bit of field and if a wet year would of said water logging
 

juke

Member
Location
DURHAM
Got same symptoms ,,su damage is crop taking residue up , as it’s been so dry ,straw was removed and we ploughed it ,as had crop failure with stubble turnips last year ,ours is in a low bit of field and if a wet year would of said water logging
that was a thought had it been chemical left over in the soil causing the issue, the other fields had different autumn herbicides applied.
 

juke

Member
Location
DURHAM
Do you find 25 kg too thick ,did ours at 14 and seem plenty thick enough
This cover was sown at alot more than 25 kg , needed to use the seed up , we normally sow at 35 kg , but I think this was about 40 kg , radish inclusion was about 9 kg 3 varietys
 

Will 1594

Member
Arable Farmer
Juke are yours looking like this , the couple of patches where wet as had a blocked drain last year ,if it had been wet time now would of thought water logging ,we ploughed it 9/10 inch deep as it had su ,to bring up clean soil ,but could roots be in that layer now ,or is it a foliage disease
 

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juke

Member
Location
DURHAM
Juke are yours looking like this , the couple of patches where wet as had a blocked drain last year ,if it had been wet time now would of thought water logging ,we ploughed it 9/10 inch deep as it had su ,to bring up clean soil ,but could roots be in that layer now ,or is it a foliage disease
Yes they are similar to yours , I've just been looking through someone else game crop there today , this was ploughed land and hasn't seen any su chemical for 2 years at least they plough too, I'm wondering if it's drout stress or.some fungal disease .. gonna get the Agronomist to have a look this week hopefully
 

juke

Member
Location
DURHAM
Have you applied DFF to the previous crop? That is more persistent than SUs IMO.
No the weather last year stopped pre em on that field ... We have become aware this year of the issues with dff and it's half life. It will be 3 seasons since that field was treated with dff. Normally in our rotation it's every other year a field will see dff treatment.
 

Brisel

Member
Location
Dorset
I see no problem with DFF residues. Sure, it tickles the following crop but it soon grows away from it. I'd rather use this cheap & useful herbicide in cereals.
 

juke

Member
Location
DURHAM
We only grow first wheats, and a little bit of winter barley for osr entry. That at the moment means two hits of dff haven't seen it knock the osr crops previous .. I have wondered with it being such a dry year and things has the chemical stayed in the soil longer than the 300 day half life.
 

juke

Member
Location
DURHAM
We had a chap look at the covers , his thoughts were the dry conditions haven't helped and possibly lack of available nitrogen in the soil. So just looks like a combination of factors
 

Aardvark139

Member
Location
Cambridgeshire
Firstly I think you should be pretty happy with the ground cover you have achieved in a difficult season, but the seed rate looks quite high to me? This will have the effect of reducing the radishes ability to produce a big tap root but some people prefer lots of smaller ones, particularly where blackgrass is an issue. I definitely prefer to use lower rates to encourage root development, as the larger roots store and then later release back their nutrients.
There is clearly a benefit to the crop behind the wheels of the tractor, as you can see the wheeling marks showing up as darker green stripes. This suggests that better consolidation and seed to soil contact has helped the plant to find everything it needs.
 

juke

Member
Location
DURHAM
Firstly I think you should be pretty happy with the ground cover you have achieved in a difficult season, but the seed rate looks quite high to me? This will have the effect of reducing the radishes ability to produce a big tap root but some people prefer lots of smaller ones, particularly where blackgrass is an issue. I definitely prefer to use lower rates to encourage root development, as the larger roots store and then later release back their nutrients.
There is clearly a benefit to the crop behind the wheels of the tractor, as you can see the wheeling marks showing up as darker green stripes. This suggests that better consolidation and seed to soil contact has helped the plant to find everything it needs.
You are quite right the seed rate has been too high that was done for a couple of reasons , mostly how dry it was at drilling and we had seed to use up. Since it's had a few drinks the crop has come on a fair bit and recovered somewhat .

The chap we had look at it agreed the trams were greener mostly because of better consolidation.
 

Shutesy

Moderator
Arable Farmer
Location
Stansted
Quick update the poorly cover crop has picked up a fair bit in the last month
Look v similar to mine now, lot of flowering going on. Whats your plan now, how long will you leave them till destruction? Don't want them to set seed but some of mine are EFA cover crops so cant be destroyed till Jan 15th!
 

juke

Member
Location
DURHAM
Look v similar to mine now, lot of flowering going on. Whats your plan now, how long will you leave them till destruction? Don't want them to set seed but some of mine are EFA cover crops so cant be destroyed till Jan 15th!
Gonna be late January before we terminate I think , not gonna be looking to drill the barley till the first or second week of April, we had some radsihes recover last time and went thru to harvest with the spring oats they haven't caused any issues in the following wheat crop. I think if there was any issue in the following winter barley after spring barley then we can take it out with pre ems.

Don't like topping covers off as they always seem to flow through the drill if they are still attached to the ground. If it looked like they were gonna set seeds we might nip the mower across the top raised right up to nip the heads of
 
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Look v similar to mine now, lot of flowering going on. Whats your plan now, how long will you leave them till destruction? Don't want them to set seed but some of mine are EFA cover crops so cant be destroyed till Jan 15th!
will they actually set viable seed at this time of year

have barley in an oat cover that is in ear but do not expect it will set seed some of the awns have gone white after the frosts
 

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