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What's hurting these radishes

Discussion in 'Direct Drilling Crops & Agronomy' started by juke, Oct 4, 2018.

  1. juke

    juke Member

    Location:
    DURHAM
    Got some radishes in a cover crop in one field that aren't looking to healthy would anyone have any idea from these photos what the problem could be.

    The field is following wheat , last autumn was treated with pico stomp and in the spring with palio .. p n k were all good in spring testing , has had compost prior to drilling at 25/hectare as have other cover cropped fields none of those showing any issues only difference is this field has had well rotted horse muck on it ..
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Oct 4, 2018
  2. Got same symptoms ,,su damage is crop taking residue up , as it’s been so dry ,straw was removed and we ploughed it ,as had crop failure with stubble turnips last year ,ours is in a low bit of field and if a wet year would of said water logging
     
  3. juke

    juke Member

    Location:
    DURHAM
    that was a thought had it been chemical left over in the soil causing the issue, the other fields had different autumn herbicides applied.
     
  4. Do you find 25 kg too thick ,did ours at 14 and seem plenty thick enough
     
  5. juke

    juke Member

    Location:
    DURHAM
    This cover was sown at alot more than 25 kg , needed to use the seed up , we normally sow at 35 kg , but I think this was about 40 kg , radish inclusion was about 9 kg 3 varietys
     
  6. Juke are yours looking like this , the couple of patches where wet as had a blocked drain last year ,if it had been wet time now would of thought water logging ,we ploughed it 9/10 inch deep as it had su ,to bring up clean soil ,but could roots be in that layer now ,or is it a foliage disease
     

    Attached Files:

  7. juke

    juke Member

    Location:
    DURHAM
    Yes they are similar to yours , I've just been looking through someone else game crop there today , this was ploughed land and hasn't seen any su chemical for 2 years at least they plough too, I'm wondering if it's drout stress or.some fungal disease .. gonna get the Agronomist to have a look this week hopefully
     
    Will 1594 likes this.
  8. Brisel

    Brisel Member

    Location:
    Dorset
    Have you applied DFF to the previous crop? That is more persistent than SUs IMO.
     
  9. juke

    juke Member

    Location:
    DURHAM
    No the weather last year stopped pre em on that field ... We have become aware this year of the issues with dff and it's half life. It will be 3 seasons since that field was treated with dff. Normally in our rotation it's every other year a field will see dff treatment.
     
    Brisel likes this.
  10. Brisel

    Brisel Member

    Location:
    Dorset
    I see no problem with DFF residues. Sure, it tickles the following crop but it soon grows away from it. I'd rather use this cheap & useful herbicide in cereals.
     
    juke likes this.
  11. juke

    juke Member

    Location:
    DURHAM
    We only grow first wheats, and a little bit of winter barley for osr entry. That at the moment means two hits of dff haven't seen it knock the osr crops previous .. I have wondered with it being such a dry year and things has the chemical stayed in the soil longer than the 300 day half life.
     
  12. Brisel

    Brisel Member

    Location:
    Dorset
    Could well be the case.
     
  13. juke

    juke Member

    Location:
    DURHAM
    We had a chap look at the covers , his thoughts were the dry conditions haven't helped and possibly lack of available nitrogen in the soil. So just looks like a combination of factors
     
    Brisel likes this.

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