Wheat as a cover crop

alomy75

Member
Thinking aloud now; how about wheat spun on a standing crop of (in my case, beans or wheat) to keep some living roots in the ground in that August to October period? I’m warming to cover crops but not to leguminous ones, ones that cost loads to buy or ones that could present as weeds in following years and I’ve got back to buckwheat and wheat. I’m thinking wheat would spin on quite nicely through a fert spreader late June time(?)
 

Lincsman

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
Thinking aloud now; how about wheat spun on a standing crop of (in my case, beans or wheat) to keep some living roots in the ground in that August to October period? I’m warming to cover crops but not to leguminous ones, ones that cost loads to buy or ones that could present as weeds in following years and I’ve got back to buckwheat and wheat. I’m thinking wheat would spin on quite nicely through a fert spreader late June time(?)
Should keep all the diseases going until the proper wheat crop emerges.
 

PSQ

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Scottish Borders
If you want to use a spinner then use spring oats instead. I did some as a green manure on a couple of patches of failed W.OSR, and it ticked all the boxes.
The only issue with applying to a standing crop will be having to spread every 12m as it's like throwing feathers. Better spun on immediately after harvest at 6 or 8m spacing for overlap, and tickle them in with a light cultivation.
 

alomy75

Member
If you want to use a spinner then use spring oats instead. I did some as a green manure on a couple of patches of failed W.OSR, and it ticked all the boxes.
The only issue with applying to a standing crop will be having to spread every 12m as it's like throwing feathers. Better spun on immediately after harvest at 6 or 8m spacing for overlap, and tickle them in with a light cultivation.
Good idea but was hoping to go earlier or may as well just leave the volunteers 🤷‍♂️
 

Lincsman

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
Funny how systems change, back in the 70's it was super flow drags stubble cleaning before the next crop, now its add more seeds to keep it full of volunteers and avoid killing weeds and not allowing more weeds to germinate before planting.
 
Last edited:

jack6480

Member
Location
Staffs
Funny how systems change, back in the 70's it was super flow drags stubble cleaning before the next crop, now its add more seeds to keep it full of volunteers and avoid killing weeds and getting not allowing more weeds to germinate before planting.
You can’t reinvent the wheel
 

ben__adamss

Member
BASE UK Member
If you want cheap and quick then oats, mustard, linseed and buckwheat would likely be best
Spreading is an issue, perhaps a local avadex contractor may have a suitable machine
 

alomy75

Member
Maybe drill it?
On my land I don’t think the cover crop would have time to do anything before I want to drill the next proper crop. Also the cost/time element of ‘drilling’ a cover crop is restrictive in my mind. The results aren’t tangible enough imo. But £15/ha or whatever to get an Avadex chap to spread I can live with
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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