Who's worried about the lack of rain?

robbie

Member
BASIS
Yes it's dry but you don't have to dig down far to find good amounts of moisture, I'll be getting worried in a fortnight thought.
Biggest headache is weather to put fert on now or wait. I did some yesterday and the day before and we caught a decent shower which has melted the prills into the soil.
 

Zippy768

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Dorset/Wilts
Its been dry, but not warm and no wind either. There is still moisture under the surface to keep things going.
Could do with a rainy day, but not worried yet
 

solo

Member
Location
worcestershire
Lack of rainfall is more worrying once temperature are in the 20’s with drying winds. Fortunately it’s not that warm yet. Farming sandy soils I believe a moisture deficit now encourages winter crops to develop better rooting systems. However spring sown barley in particular doesn’t fare so well when in early yield building growth stages.
 

teslacoils

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
3t of dry wheat at £200/t, reduced fungicide spend and f all straw to mix in is the dream.

I'll take that over 4t at £150/t, sprayer stuck in mud, bloody stuff still not dead in September and piles of straw some stock chap thinks is fine to sit on the swath three weeks because they are to mean to turn it.
 

Steevo

Member
Location
Gloucestershire
3t of dry wheat at £200/t, reduced fungicide spend and f all straw to mix in is the dream.

I'll take that over 4t at £150/t, sprayer stuck in mud, bloody stuff still not dead in September and piles of straw some stock chap thinks is fine to sit on the swath three weeks because they are to mean to turn it.
Agreed.

Just hope it isn’t harvested at 25% and sprouting.
 

shakerator

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
LINCS
3t of dry wheat at £200/t, reduced fungicide spend and f all straw to mix in is the dream.

I'll take that over 4t at £150/t, sprayer stuck in mud, bloody stuff still not dead in September and piles of straw some stock chap thinks is fine to sit on the swath three weeks because they are to mean to turn it.
you shouldn’t have added the amistar at the T5
 

nick...

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
south norfolk
Still moisture in soil here but ground starting to crack and very little root on cereals.I’m concerned about final dose of nitram and when to put it on with no rain forecast.I’m just as concerned about so little growth on crops too.thinking straw will be very short at harvest Aswell
nick...
 

radar

Member
Mixed Farmer
Must be water underground somewhere, as a damp patch that we went round when drilling has now developed into a running spring! In the 50 odd years that we've had that field never seen before. Think a drain required1
 

Barleymow

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Ipswich
Still moisture in soil here but ground starting to crack and very little root on cereals.I’m concerned about final dose of nitram and when to put it on with no rain forecast.I’m just as concerned about so little growth on crops too.thinking straw will be very short at harvest Aswell
nick...
Put mine on yesterday in case we only get one wet day to wash it in .will do liquid urea on June for protein worrying bit I think will be lack of straw.Baled the lot last year and just about have enough to see me through
 

nick...

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
south norfolk
Put mine on yesterday in case we only get one wet day to wash it in .will do liquid urea on June for protein worrying bit I think will be lack of straw.Baled the lot last year and just about have enough to see me through
My neighbor has straw for his pigs and he will run out before harvest.can’t see there being much straw.nothing more than 6 inches tall round here.
nick...
 

robbie

Member
BASIS
Same here @nick... The straw situation is getting worrying. When we had a bad state year last harvest we were all sitting on bug carry overs this year I may just be able to scrape through to harvest but I'll be tight and we really need a good straw harvest to bolster stocks again.

I've heard several say they'll either miss a batch of pigs or cut numbers to make the state last.

I'm trying to do all I can to grow as much straw as possible, if it goes flat so be it I've got a good set of lifters.
 

nick...

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
south norfolk
Same here @nick... The straw situation is getting worrying. When we had a bad state year last harvest we were all sitting on bug carry overs this year I may just be able to scrape through to harvest but I'll be tight and we really need a good straw harvest to bolster stocks again.

I've heard several say they'll either miss a batch of pigs or cut numbers to make the state last.

I'm trying to do all I can to grow as much straw as possible, if it goes flat so be it I've got a good set of lifters.
My neighbors wanted to wait a few weeks and remain empty and then refill so batch was still in at harvest but I think the company where short of homes fir piglets and refilled them any way.if there is no straw it becomes a welfare issue especially if really hot.heard prices of £120 ton for straw recently and I’ve been offered £50 bale for 9 Heston bales I’ve got keeping the weather out of a shed.these bales are 6 years old too.it’s getting very desperate.the pig companies should pay more for keep instead of keep screwing the farmers.
nick...
 

Wombat

Member
Location
East yorks
As said could just do with a wet afternoon to chit the last 25 acres of no till barley that’s still sat there.

The 2 weeks of wind really sucked the moisture out a few weeks ago and not a shower since 14th March
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

  • 450
  • 0


Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
Top