Why can't wind fallen trees be cleared?

egbert

Member
Is this that tenants don't own the timber?
Or that the land is under agreement to retain a proportion of dead wood for invertebrates?
 

renewablejohn

Member
Location
lancs
Local town had that policy of any trees felled had to remain on site with brash used for habitat. Policy only lasted 6 months until the timber was dry enough to burn then after numerous fires which the fire brigade had to put out. the policy changed to all timber including brash cleared from site the same day as felled.
 
our landscape is too managed by us, to look tidy. I read an article many years ago, talking about natural woodland and the amount of debris and dead wood they had, and I think the article said in the UK there is no woodland with a natural amount of dead wood in it. Nature looks untidy. That's why, I plan to leave the Ash trees here until they fall over (then I will clear them up - I know what is best for nature, but all farming is a compromise between nature and production)
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
I’m wondering if the OP has been here. :scratchhead:

The centre of this farm is a 16th Century deer park, with lots of old majestic oaks dating from that time that are now starting to fall over.:( There are currently two were the trunks are left were they fell (the limbs being cleared for firewood obviously), and they make great lambing shelter.
 

bluebell

Member
havnt people forgot their history taught at schools of the UK from ironage settlements and the beginning of farming? all or nearly all of europe has been farmed, even uninhabitated islands were farmed from thousands of years ago up to recently, this countries countryside has been managed, farmed by man for thousands of years, Unlike the american continent , australia , africia etc etc were mans development in virgin unspoilt land is having a speeding up impact? I remember a few years ago in the farmers weekly they were talking about a farm in canada growing wheat, the wheat crop being grown was the first ever crop being grown on this land, or of any crop, before total native land? Compare it to fields in the UK, metal detecting shows much of the long history of these fields ?
 

CPF

Member
Arable Farmer
If you don’t manage woodland properly and clean up wood properly and just leave it alone and this happens everything dies and it all has to start again been there seen it very scary . I can see it happening in the UK with this rewilding ,if we get a dry year all that dry bushel land going up in smoke.
 

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bluebell

Member
what they fail to mention, and again common sense tells you? the biggest threat facing the world and here in the UK is population growth, and by that the development that brings, something like between 12-30,000 acres a year of land mostly farmland lost to development? the USA is losing a staggering 15,000 acres a day?.
 

DrWazzock

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
If you don’t manage woodland properly and clean up wood properly and just leave it alone and this happens everything dies and it all has to start again been there seen it very scary . I can see it happening in the UK with this rewilding ,if we get a dry year all that dry bushel land going up in smoke.
I can see that happening. Left some trimmings in our wood; feeling good about sequestration but as they get dryer and dryer it’s just a large fire waiting to happen. Rambler fag end and up she goes.
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
I can see that happening. Left some trimmings in our wood; feeling good about sequestration but as they get dryer and dryer it’s just a large fire waiting to happen. Rambler fag end and up she goes.

The estate have been harvesting some of their woods in the last few years. Trunks have been removed and all the brash is windrowed up between the stumps, the rows being about 10’ wide and 6’ high. Great habitat, but now tinder dry and some of it right by the road….
 

Update on the Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot

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Update on the Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot

Written by Lisa Applin

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In July, we opened the applications window for farmers to join our Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot.

The Sustainable Farming Incentive is 1 of the 3 new environmental land management schemes. It sits alongside the future Local Nature Recovery and Landscape Recovery schemes.

Through the Sustainable Farming Incentive, farmers will be paid for environmentally sustainable actions – ones that are simple to do and do not require previous agri-environment scheme experience.

We are piloting the scheme to...
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