Wide spacing cereal crops... pictures please

As above really, I know there are various people who post in the direct drilling photo gallery thread but I was hoping some could share pictures throughout the growing season, this 1 especially, of crops grown at 250mm spacing (or there abouts)

It isn't really the year to be able to go cruising round the countryside to visit these crops so I was hoping you could bring them here

Also if you could say whether they were drilled by disc or tine that would be handy as well

Thanks!
180kgsha into bean stubble end sep mzuri
 

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Lancer bread wheat, at 40 kg / ha, on 333mm row spacing, planted July.
Top dressed with 200 kg / ha of urea ( so about 90 kg N ) in August
image.jpg

As with the durum, no rain since August & frost damage in October, so not to its full potential
image.jpg
 

Badshot

Member
Location
Kent
I guess it's too dry for slugs then @Farmer Roy .
40kg/ha would disappear almost before planting in most cases over here.
It's common to see 250kg/ha disappear.

Looks pretty useful.
Been reading that Australia is into a decent harvest this year.
👍
 
I guess it's too dry for slugs then @Farmer Roy .
40kg/ha would disappear almost before planting in most cases over here.
It's common to see 250kg/ha disappear.

Looks pretty useful.
Been reading that Australia is into a decent harvest this year.
👍
yeah, slugs aren’t an issue, have never seen them here in a cropping situation, even in particularly wet winters. We do however at times have issues with soil borne larvae like wire worm & cut worm ( once lost a field of emerging chickpeas due to cut worm. Couldn’t believe how quick they went across it. ) & one year I did have problems with crickets eating emerging sunflowers.

As a rough rule of thumb, I suppose we always aim for or expect around 80% or better establishment, from the seed we plant, taking into account germination % & establishment losses.
For example, the sorghum I planted last week was at 55,000 seeds / ha, with the aim of establishing around 45,000 plants / ha . . .
 
I have had problems with wild pigs digging chickpea seed out of the ground though 😮

they just stick their nose in the ground & follow the row, chasing the seed. Make a hell of a mess & can damage surprisingly large areas very quickly
 

farmerfred86

Member
BASIS
Location
Suffolk
its not so much the 250 spacing but the thickness of the band that concerns me. A 12m horsch for example is on the same spacing as a claydon drill at 250mm.
 

alomy75

Member
I’ve drilled wheat at 250kg/ha, 250mm spacing behind a metcalfe coulter so less than 15mm wide (can’t remember exactly how wide they are). Looks fine. I’m hoping it will better compete against blackgrass in the row whilst potentially allowing us to inter-row hoe if we develop a grass weed problem in the future. Doesn’t look unduly thick but is a solid line as you would expect...but then there’s loads of space either side.
 
I’ve drilled wheat at 250kg/ha, 250mm spacing behind a metcalfe coulter so less than 15mm wide (can’t remember exactly how wide they are). Looks fine. I’m hoping it will better compete against blackgrass in the row whilst potentially allowing us to inter-row hoe if we develop a grass weed problem in the future. Doesn’t look unduly thick but is a solid line as you would expect...but then there’s loads of space either side.
Theory always said greater than 6" 150mm was yield reducing but will be interested to hear how it does. Plenty of ventilation and light interception to the bottom of the crop though. Mix of hybrid 6 row WB and 2 row at 6" always did very well.
 
All our old gear back in the full cultivation days was either 6”, 7” or 9” row spacings

Trials - not theory - here showed no significant yield loss out to 300 - 375 mm spacings, with the added advantages of cheaper machinery ( less rows per metre ), less fuel use, increased trash flow for zero till into retained straw / stubble, increased air flow thus less disease & the ability to easily inter row plant between last years rows using auto steer

what’s not to like ?
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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