Will high fertiliser prices change you’re cropping plan.

Hampton

Member
Location
Shropshire
Might lower winter barley for spring barley, although I found spring wheat yielded half a tonne per acre more than SB so might do that.
going to carry on with similar winter wheat acreage. £170-180 off combine next year is still an excellent return.
 

fudge

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire.
As per title.
I am thinking of dropping winter barley and reducing wheat in favour of spring crops grown with plenty of pig muck under them .
What’s everyone’s thoughts ?
It won't alter my cropping for the coming year since the fertiliser has been purchased. However going forward there is a big question mark over second wheat here. Moving to all first wheat with OSR,beans and fallow/stewardship would improve purchased N utilisation. As others suggest milling wheat is off the menu ATM.
 

PSQ

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Scottish Borders
I was looking to replace 2nd wheats with spring oats, but a shortage of contracts combined with Quaker demanding Leaf Marque membership* and falling oat contract prices has knocked that on the head. They obviously aren't making enough money with a 3000% markup that they feel they have to screw the ex farm oat price further into the ground.

* - Quaker desperately trying to 'greenwash' the fact that it's parent company PepsiCo creates 137,000 tonnes of plastic pollution per year – equivalent to covering 22 football pitches a day (equivalent to 5.5 billion plastic bottles a year), 2nd only to CocaCola at 200,000 tonnes of plastic waste

 
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Andrew1983

Member
Location
Black Isle
Am I correct in thinking there are areas of the world, Aus/Canada and more so into the former Soviet countries that only bother planting wheat when the price is high? Will the high fertiliser price prevent that happening meaning the high price wave might take a year or 2 longer before it crashes 🤷‍♂️
 

Chae1

Member
Location
Aberdeenshire
Am I correct in thinking there are areas of the world, Aus/Canada and more so into the former Soviet countries that only bother planting wheat when the price is high? Will the high fertiliser price prevent that happening meaning the high price wave might take a year or 2 longer before it crashes 🤷‍♂️
Can't see it happening here!

Prices are often completely different at harvest to drilling time.
 

Renaultman

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Darlington
We’ve often spread muck in March on bone hard ground destined for maize . Don’t think you can pin any month down as being dry or wet
I top dressed some ww with turkey muck this year, only 1t/acre as an experiment, I will probably try it again. Digestate may be available, as an option too.
 

Daniel

Member
I’ve got quotes for a new fert spreader, our 2003 Amazone is pretty crude, on/off and that’s it, at these prices the savings from weigh cells and section control over 5-600ac will mean the spreader pays for itself well before its worn out?
 

robs1

Member
We’ve often spread muck in March on bone hard ground destined for maize . Don’t think you can pin any month down as being dry or wet
Our clay is like plastic then and then like rock, never grew spring crops until we went to dd, if the autumn muck ban actually becomes a reality I will plaster it on our westerwold break and then put in oats or spring wheat rather than an autumn crop,
 

Update on the Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot

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Update on the Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot

Written by Lisa Applin

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In July, we opened the applications window for farmers to join our Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot.

The Sustainable Farming Incentive is 1 of the 3 new environmental land management schemes. It sits alongside the future Local Nature Recovery and Landscape Recovery schemes.

Through the Sustainable Farming Incentive, farmers will be paid for environmentally sustainable actions – ones that are simple to do and do not require previous agri-environment scheme experience.

We are piloting the scheme to...
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