Will we be ploughing for re seeding in the future?

som farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
somerset
yeah ex spud ground can be a challenge to manage.
total agreement, we let a block, every year, moving around the farm, that became, can we have a maize crop first, then spuds, followed by wheat, to utilise the excess fert from the spuds ! The result, soil structure destroyed, weed seeds resurrected, plough pan to sort out, nightmare, and extremely glad we stopped.
 

Bury the Trash

Member
Mixed Farmer
total agreement, we let a block, every year, moving around the farm, that became, can we have a maize crop first, then spuds, followed by wheat, to utilise the excess fert from the spuds ! The result, soil structure destroyed, weed seeds resurrected, plough pan to sort out, nightmare, and extremely glad we stopped.
Yes.

But What i meant as well, is also that Derek is being a bit crafty about the photos he is showing as comparisons.
 
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Location
Ceredigion
Damage is done long before the ridger
With the Plough ?

Sprayed with roundup to kill docks , ploughed , power harrow then drill , not a lot different to your re,seeding then , if the weather is kind in the Autumn will bang some Westerwolds in as a winter cover
 
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Sid

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
South Molton
I never said you did. Can't you read
You said there wouldn't be much soil damage by the ridger.
I said the damage was done when it was ploughed.
You said it wasn't much different than ploughing to reseed, a operation you have said is bad, but it's OK for £££.

Ploughing has its place ,given its a once in maybe 5 years, probably 10 or never in some fields.
That must be better than spraying off , making the soil lifeless by killing all food sources and direct drilling every 2,3, or 5 years?
 
Location
Ceredigion
You said there wouldn't be much soil damage by the ridger.
I said the damage was done when it was ploughed.
You said it wasn't much different than ploughing to reseed, a operation you have said is bad, but it's OK for £££.

Ploughing has its place ,given its a once in maybe 5 years, probably 10 or never in some fields.
That must be better than spraying off , making the soil lifeless by killing all food sources and direct drilling every 2,3, or 5 years?
Your allowed your opinion, don't make it right or wrong , neither does mine, for potatoes and some other situations I can't see any option but ploughing , yes for £ . Is than not why we are in business ,
We have the top site in Europe for blight trials , I hope some UK farmers benefit from the work that's being going on for many years here
 
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som farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
somerset
Tractors way too big
think l would agree with that, our p/t help has bought a ford dexter, which is in our yard, it's tiny, and yet, we used to get all the work done, with similar, scary looking back.
Are the einbok tines/drill going into worked ground, or scratching in ? The first works well, the scratching didn't work here, at all, and l would suggest a proper d/d would work better. Nor would l dare to sow grass, at this time of year, to dry, but perhaps it's rape, or similar.
 
Location
Ceredigion
think l would agree with that, our p/t help has bought a ford dexter, which is in our yard, it's tiny, and yet, we used to get all the work done, with similar, scary looking back.
Are the einbok tines/drill going into worked ground, or scratching in ? The first works well, the scratching didn't work here, at all, and l would suggest a proper d/d would work better. Nor would l dare to sow grass, at this time of year, to dry, but perhaps it's rape, or similar.
I sowed some a week ago and it's coming up, it's monsoon climate here , that tractor is it smallest he's got
To stoney for a direct drill
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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