Winter Barley growing advice.

Joe Boy

Member
Location
Essex
I have swapped my rape area for winter barley as in 3 yrs I've yet to produce a decent crop. I'm determined to make the barley a success and save all that time chasing pigeons and slug pelleting.

My seed turned up this morning, Glacier TWG 51, for some heavy clay, Tower (TWG 66) for medium soils and I have some fletcher hybrid barley coming for a block of light land.

What sort I seed rates should I go for, and what's the earliest I can start drilling, what variety would best best suited to early drilling?

I have a lot of rooks/crows gathering were the conventional barley is going, should I up the seed rate to compensate or just plant deeper?

Any advice much appreciated.
 

Brisel

Member
NFFN Member
Location
North Yorkshire
I plant 330 seeds/m2 in late September for non hybrids on light land. That assumes a good seedbed. If corvids are that much of an issue you can start around 18th September & it wil be up and away from their beaks before you know it. Plant it 1.5 inches deep as usual to keep it out of reach of the pre emergence herbicides. You can go a little deeper if the seedbed is rough. Roll it tight & watch it grow!

I'm not familliar with Fletcher but as a general rule, I'd do the Tower first, then ther Glacier then the hybrid. If the weather is catchy then drill whatever you can get in well first. With such big grains for the Tower it will have plenty of vigour.
 

spin cycle

Member
Location
north norfolk
What don't grow barley or don't grow anything

whats worth growing?......if osr area is down...other crops reduced.....livestock sector struggling...pound high......where's all the barley going to go?......budget on £90/t?.....as likely to be £80 perhaps?....my point really is that all crops are down so isn't chopping/changing just an excersize in 'swapping clothes'?
 

tr250

Member
Location
Northants
I a good spring I prefer spring barley over winter for lots of reasons not least margin and cash flow.
I'm the other way round mainly because we are too busy in spring also as you say you need a good spring. I understand cashflow but margin I believe better on winter barley yes some years spring barly will stack up but some years it can be poor. Winter is more constsistant in my opinion and it's ready to harvest earlier less combine capacity needed and osr can be drilled earlier
 

tr250

Member
Location
Northants
whats worth growing?......if osr area is down...other crops reduced.....livestock sector struggling...pound high......where's all the barley going to go?......budget on £90/t?.....as likely to be £80 perhaps?....my point really is that all crops are down so isn't chopping/changing just an excersize in 'swapping clothes'?
Yes point taken its all looking a bit gloomy not but said barley could be sold in spring 17 who knows the price then it might be £150 a ton it might not also but we don't know
 

tr250

Member
Location
Northants
Until the chem manufacturers produce something other than one trick ponies there'll be no barely grown here .
I prefer barley than wheat if your talking blackgrass I know you can't use Atlantis but barley is more tollerant to blackgrass and more competitive . Nothing worse than thin wheat crops
 

bobk

Member
Location
stafford
I prefer barley than wheat if your talking blackgrass I know you can't use Atlantis but barley is more tollerant to blackgrass and more competitive . Nothing worse than thin wheat crops

No bg here , but we're good at growing other weeds , so spring herbicide is ally, axial + agidor and starane :eek:
 

Brisel

Member
NFFN Member
Location
North Yorkshire
That's a common spring herbicide programme & hardly breaks the bank, esp if you can get the Axial on early (T0) with generic methylated rapeseed oil not that expensive Syngenta Adigor.
 

Joe Boy

Member
Location
Essex
I plant 330 seeds/m2 in late September for non hybrids on light land. That assumes a good seedbed. If corvids are that much of an issue you can start around 18th September & it wil be up and away from their beaks before you know it. Plant it 1.5 inches deep as usual to keep it out of reach of the pre emergence herbicides. You can go a little deeper if the seedbed is rough. Roll it tight & watch it grow!

I'm not familliar with Fletcher but as a general rule, I'd do the Tower first, then ther Glacier then the hybrid. If the weather is catchy then drill whatever you can get in well first. With such big grains for the Tower it will have plenty of vigour.


Thanks for the advice. I have three fields were the hybrid barley is going that have gone rape then peas. So should be a cracking crop in there.
 

Fuzzy

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Bedfordshire
I have swapped my rape area for winter barley as in 3 yrs I've yet to produce a decent crop. I'm determined to make the barley a success and save all that time chasing pigeons and slug pelleting.

My seed turned up this morning, Glacier TWG 51, for some heavy clay, Tower (TWG 66) for medium soils and I have some fletcher hybrid barley coming for a block of light land.

What sort I seed rates should I go for, and what's the earliest I can start drilling, what variety would best best suited to early drilling?

I have a lot of rooks/crows gathering were the conventional barley is going, should I up the seed rate to compensate or just plant deeper?

Any advice much appreciated.
How did you get on with the Hybrid fletcher Barley?
 

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New report underlines need for joined-up action to protect rivers

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A wide river is in view in a valley in the background, a drystone wall is behind the river, and large, green trees are prominent in the scene.


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