Winter beans

tr250

Member
Location
Northants
Drilled ours around the 15th Oct as deep as a disc drill with put them so about 3” and they’ve been up a long while in the row. Is there any advantage to have them come up so late?
 

ZXR17

Member
Location
South Dorset
Direct drilled ours 9th November , with our Weaving Sabre Tine drill , and they're just about showing a row but painfully slow to emerge . It seems that the later drilled ones are all slow down here this year and it's not been cold . Also having trouble with rooks and crows. Pheasants and partridges also a major problem but of course they don't count :banghead:
 

tw15

Member
Location
DORSET
Just put a second lot of beans in ( 20 ha ) yesterday and today all sprayed with pre em today . The reason they have only just gone in the wooly locust's had not finished the turnips till last weekend might see the beans in Feb .
 

czechmate

Member
Mixed Farmer
My little Nitrogen factory😊


image.jpg
 

Wombat

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
East yorks
Ours drilled early nov are coming through nicely but the crows are being a pia as now the stems have thickened up they have realised they can pull the whole 3-4inch bean out to get at the seed, bloody things
 

CORK

Member
Ours drilled early nov are coming through nicely but the crows are being a pia as now the stems have thickened up they have realised they can pull the whole 3-4inch bean out to get at the seed, bloody things
They were at ours too as well as a late field of wheat. I invested in some crow decoys this year - my goodness they are some job.

Things have changed from where I might knock one or two unlucky crows to where I might actually make an impact on the local crow population.

in just 4 hours one morning I despatched 64 of them at one spot, they haven’t come back since.
 

CORK

Member
Well done that man. I haven’t ever really decoyed crows successfully or know anyone that has.
I’m a complete novice at it (have had moderate success with pigeons in the past) but the crows seem to be a walk in the park so far. As the the crows fall, I go out periodically and arrange the dead crows so they appear to be sitting eating the crop amongst the decoys. Even those clever, horrid grey crows are a relatively easy shot as they are particularly nosey.

You can see the odd wiser crow flying at a distance but most come right in close for the shot. They land into the wind.
Crouching or using a camouflage fence is important so they don’t see the human standing silhouette.
I have a camouflage veil over my face too.
The bodies are then torn up and scattered across the field, job done.

They really get the message from what I’ve seen so far. Pigeons on the other hand will keep coming until the last one is shot.
I remember hearing years ago about the importance of not letting them see the human silhouette - to prove the point, a shooter once wrapped himself in that red plastic netting that you see on road works. It was bright red but disguised his shape and the pigeons kept flying in.
CD1DDC83-7390-495C-BC89-C4E94CDC4CC8.jpeg
F704889B-F638-459E-8CEA-66C32A91BADB.jpeg
 

farenheit

Member
Location
Midlands
I’m a complete novice at it (have had moderate success with pigeons in the past) but the crows seem to be a walk in the park so far. As the the crows fall, I go out periodically and arrange the dead crows so they appear to be sitting eating the crop amongst the decoys. Even those clever, horrid grey crows are a relatively easy shot as they are particularly nosey.

You can see the odd wiser crow flying at a distance but most come right in close for the shot. They land into the wind.
Crouching or using a camouflage fence is important so they don’t see the human standing silhouette.
I have a camouflage veil over my face too.
The bodies are then torn up and scattered across the field, job done.

They really get the message from what I’ve seen so far. Pigeons on the other hand will keep coming until the last one is shot.
I remember hearing years ago about the importance of not letting them see the human silhouette - to prove the point, a shooter once wrapped himself in that red plastic netting that you see on road works. It was bright red but disguised his shape and the pigeons kept flying in.
View attachment 1005032View attachment 1005033
All seems like a lot of work to me! Stick a gas gun out there instead
 

Fish

Member
Location
North yorkshire
They were at ours too as well as a late field of wheat. I invested in some crow decoys this year - my goodness they are some job.

Things have changed from where I might knock one or two unlucky crows to where I might actually make an impact on the local crow population.

in just 4 hours one morning I despatched 64 of them at one spot, they haven’t come back since.
Well done, for decoying crows try a dead fox, I know it sound daft, but it works.
 

Zippy768

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Dorset/Wilts
Ours started poking though about 3 weeks ago.
Being decimated by rooks. Drilled either side of a valley with the bloody things nesting in the valley trees next to the houses.
They are just continually pulling the stems out.
Gas bangers and kites out, but rooks are smart bug9ers
 
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tw15

Member
Location
DORSET
Rooks are smart they used to say they could count to 3 and if you were to go shooting them 4 of you would walk into the roost wood and one walk out leaving 3 to shoot . i think that is right what an old boy told me years ago .
At times they can be doing you a service and then at other times damage . Find that a few dead ones hanging on sticks helps keep um away .
 

Zippy768

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Dorset/Wilts
Rooks are smart they used to say they could count to 3 and if you were to go shooting them 4 of you would walk into the roost wood and one walk out leaving 3 to shoot . i think that is right what an old boy told me years ago .
At times they can be doing you a service and then at other times damage . Find that a few dead ones hanging on sticks helps keep um away .
What good service does a Rook bring?
All they seem to do round here is take..
 

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Written by Charlotte Cunningham from CPM Magazine

JCB has launched new Fastrac 4000 and 8000 Series tractors with an all-new electronics infrastructure which is claimed to deliver higher levels of performance. According to JCB, the new Fastrac iCon operator environment has three key features: iConfigure – creating a bespoke control experience for every operator iConnect – integrating advanced precision agriculture technology iControl – redefining operation through new driveline software The 175hp to 348hp (133kW to 260kW) Fastracs feature the new iCon armrest console and touch-screen display to provide flexibility in operator allocation and operator information, as well as a new transmission control strategy to enhance operator comfort and powertrain efficiency, says the manufacturer...
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