Worst courier firm

kiwi pom

Member
Location
canterbury NZ
I'd rather sh!t in my hands and clap than be a multidrop courier driver.
Same.
At least here its fairly easy to find rural properties through their rapid numbers on the address. Finding rural houses in the UK would drive you mad.
My parents and their neighbours (in sunny Cheshire) are always complaining about couriers and folk in general, knocking on the door looking for an address. None of them have the sense to put the house/farm/business name/number at the roadside to help identify the place:banghead:
 

Smith31

Member
Fek me some don't half moan, it's about £4 to send a parcel what do you expect?

If farmers operated a parcel company they would incorporate a £50 surcharge per parcel for the damage caused to their vans going up unmaintained farm tracks.

Some farmers are lucky the parcel companies have the decency to deliver to their homes, considering the state of the roads that lead to them.
 
Fek me some don't half moan, it's about £4 to send a parcel what do you expect?

If farmers operated a parcel company they would incorporate a £50 surcharge per parcel for the damage caused to their vans going up unmaintained farm tracks.

Some farmers are lucky the parcel companies have the decency to deliver to their homes, considering the state of the roads that lead to them.
No they'd all be undercutting each other and we could shift a pallet for 3.50
 
They wouldn't if they were doing the runs themselves, especially the rural ones. I don't think people realise the work involved and the sheer number of stops/parcels, some of these people have to do.
Yeh, when Yodel used to be the final courier with stock from the US... young lad would rock up gone 9 at night. He was good and bring it earlier than the due date. He was on 220 a day and not a straight panel on a Fresh Sprinter.

He's on with someone else now. And Yodel have gone through drivers like no tomorrow on our round.

The stock started sitting for 5-6 days 40 miles away and put on the van on the due date. No more Yodel
 

unlacedgecko

Member
Livestock Farmer
They wouldn't if they were doing the runs themselves, especially the rural ones. I don't think people realise the work involved and the sheer number of stops/parcels, some of these people have to do.
Screenshot_20220425-212929.png


Those earning figures are gross. Out of that needs to be paid the van R+M, insurance, fuel and depreciation.

They will be expected to do 120-150 deliveries per day.

Most of the large parcel carrier work on a 6month churn and burn principle. The business model offered is unsustainable for the self employed courier, but there's an endless stream of mugs to be taken advantage of.

I suspect you'd struggle to find a self employed parcel delivery courier who makes minimum wage.
 

Gordy1

Member
We have quite a few deliveries here most are quite good but you always get the ones that can’t find us they just follow their satnav which gives the destination at the centre of the village then they are lost as we are on the edge of the village don’t they realise that is what the satnav does then you have to start to look for the address from there but oh no they just give up without looking any further!!!!! (Address not found) they could ask anyone & they could tell them where we are but no they turn around & go away!!!!
 

kiwi pom

Member
Location
canterbury NZ
View attachment 1031597

Those earning figures are gross. Out of that needs to be paid the van R+M, insurance, fuel and depreciation.

They will be expected to do 120-150 deliveries per day.

Most of the large parcel carrier work on a 6month churn and burn principle. The business model offered is unsustainable for the self employed courier, but there's an endless stream of mugs to be taken advantage of.

I suspect you'd struggle to find a self employed parcel delivery courier who makes minimum wage.
Same here, I've actually looked into it a little bit as companies are always advertising and have been warned off it by people in the industry. You'd make more money working a fulltime job at minimum wage or just above and have none of the hassle.
How these companies get away with classing these people as "independent contractors" I have no idea.

Slightly off topic but I was reading of one local courier the other day who's Toyota Hiace had just clocked 1 million KM's. He had to have the odometer replaced because it got stuck on 999999.9 km's:cool:
 

kiwi pom

Member
Location
canterbury NZ
We have quite a few deliveries here most are quite good but you always get the ones that can’t find us they just follow their satnav which gives the destination at the centre of the village then they are lost as we are on the edge of the village don’t they realise that is what the satnav does then you have to start to look for the address from there but oh no they just give up without looking any further!!!!! (Address not found) they could ask anyone & they could tell them where we are but no they turn around & go away!!!!
Just curious, Is your road signposted and is your property name on a sign at the gate?
 

Poorbuthappy

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Devon
View attachment 1031597

Those earning figures are gross. Out of that needs to be paid the van R+M, insurance, fuel and depreciation.

They will be expected to do 120-150 deliveries per day.

Most of the large parcel carrier work on a 6month churn and burn principle. The business model offered is unsustainable for the self employed courier, but there's an endless stream of mugs to be taken advantage of.

I suspect you'd struggle to find a self employed parcel delivery courier who makes minimum wage.
"Couriers earn as average between £400 - £700/ week"
"Salary £500- £1500/ week"

All sounds rather vague.
 
The whole Fffing lot of them ! Had parcels left in field , in public footpath , the old can’t find your address , the card quite clearly posted at a post box saying sorry we tried to deliver but you weren’t home , what a shower of ££&””!!!
Makes you appreciate the good old postie even more !
 

Paddington

Member
Location
Soggy Shropshire
Yodel left a parcel one night at 11pm, chucked over the gate, we heard the dog barking but assumed it was just someone lost turning round. Rained heavily that night and the packaging got very wet which didn't bother us as it was a set of drainrods. Well these drainrods showed to be the worst of Chinese manufacturing within the first few minutes of putting them together (ever stripped a drainrod thread with you bare hands ?) and we contacted the ebay supplier to say we wanted our money back which he agreed to. however as the packaging had been destroyed by the rain, he refused to accept them. We contacted Yodel who informed us that the parcel had been delivered to our door during the day and they had a photo of our door to prove it. We replied it was not our door. They then sent us their driver's log to show when he left the depot in the midlands 70 miles away and when he reached our door. Clearly their driver was in the wrong job as he had averaged 70mph from pick up to drop, including single track lanes, move over Lewis Hamilton. :happy:
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

court-640x360.jpg
A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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