WW T2

An Gof

Member
Location
Cornwall
Flag leaf fully emerged on the KWS Extase so the T2 has gone on today. Applying 1.25L/Ha Revystar + 5Kg EpsoTop.
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Seen Zyatt drilled 20th September on light land with flag leaf fully out and extended in one field. Overall that block was still a few days away overall. On our heavier ground mid Oct drilled Extase has flag leaf 1/2 out.

How good is Univoq on yellow rust? I've been told completely opposite things by two different agronomists I usually trust.
 

casemx 270

Member
Location
East midlands
Our T2 application is probably a week or so away I have one field of Zyatt that I applied the T1 abit late because of wind and it's very rusty so I m going with a T1.5 of teb and some magnesium .The rest of our Zyatt which had is T 1 earlier looks cleaner although pre T0 and T1 was starting to look quite rusty .
 

Farmer Fin

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Aberdeenshire
What fungicide are people going to use at T2 where the yield protental is going to lower or not quite top notch so probably not worth spending £££ so much on ?
You can put newer chemistry on at a lower rate if you wish. You would hope it would be as effective as old chemistry at a higher rate and potentially a similar cost.
 

casemx 270

Member
Location
East midlands
I know it fly's in the face of modern thinking but I work for a business man we have some really dirty fields of wheat ie Blackgrass and Ryegrass which I would was educated to not tolerate.but he thinks differently to me it will really knock the yield ( yes I know it's all wrong ) but I just wondered whether it's worth spending so much on when we will never see a return on investment
 

Two Tone

Member
Mixed Farmer
What fungicide are people going to use at T2 where the yield protental is going to lower or not quite top notch so probably not worth spending £££ so much on ?
It so depends on the variety and what disease potential there is. T2 is the most cost efficient timing, but if there is not any disease present and the weather looks dry, why bother on crops that aren’t going to give a decent yield?

If there is disease present and the variety is susceptible, then give it a suitable rate of T2 to control the disease and provide some future protection, then shut the gate. T3’s are the least most cost effective unless it suddenly turns wet in June.

If the crop never looked promising earlier, but was disease free, hopefully you didn’t bother with a T1 and certainly not a T0.


Funny how we spend so much time talking about fungicides, when in reality they are the least most cost effective products we put through the sprayer, unless disease pressures are high.
We seem obsessed with the T timings. T0 is probable a waste of time now we have lost CTL. Only bother with a T1 as long as the crop has potential. As long as there is at leat some potential give it a T2 and only a T3 if there is potential and threatening wet weather in June.
If you have a particularly disease resistant variety, you’d be amazed how well it will do without much, if any fungicides, unless it is a particularly wet weather year.
 

Zippy768

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Dorset/Wilts
It so depends on the variety and what disease potential there is. T2 is the most cost efficient timing, but if there is not any disease present and the weather looks dry, why bother on crops that aren’t going to give a decent yield?

If there is disease present and the variety is susceptible, then give it a suitable rate of T2 to control the disease and provide some future protection, then shut the gate. T3’s are the least most cost effective unless it suddenly turns wet in June.

If the crop never looked promising earlier, but was disease free, hopefully you didn’t bother with a T1 and certainly not a T0.


Funny how we spend so much time talking about fungicides, when in reality they are the least most cost effective products we put through the sprayer, unless disease pressures are high.
We seem obsessed with the T timings. T0 is probable a waste of time now we have lost CTL. Only bother with a T1 as long as the crop has potential. As long as there is at leat some potential give it a T2 and only a T3 if there is potential and threatening wet weather in June.
If you have a particularly disease resistant variety, you’d be amazed how well it will do without much, if any fungicides, unless it is a particularly wet weather year.
I think one also has to consider how closely a crop maybe monitored and how quickly one can get over the acreage if needed.
We seemed to be going through spells of prolonged dryness and prolonged wetness. If the weather does turn, potentially, how long would a crop be unprotected until a spray window arrives.

Very little of this chem (if any) has much curative action. Also taking into account latent periods, treating prophylacticlly shouldn't always be discouraged.

Sometimes "peace of mind" is worth something
 

Two Tone

Member
Mixed Farmer
I know it fly's in the face of modern thinking but I work for a business man we have some really dirty fields of wheat ie Blackgrass and Ryegrass which I would was educated to not tolerate.but he thinks differently to me it will really knock the yield ( yes I know it's all wrong ) but I just wondered whether it's worth spending so much on when we will never see a return on investment
I’ve got 2 fields that are the same.
Both are Extase variety.
One has a bad BG problem, despite ploughing and wont get any fungicides whatsoever. Fortunately it is coming DD’d Winter Linseed next year and I am reasonable confident I can tidy the BG up. It won’t get any Fungicide this year.
The other is one of 3 that was DD’d after grass and has always been a bit too thin to make that high a potential. It will just get a new Chemistry T2 and a half rate. But if it stays dry, it might not get anything.
 

egbert

Member
Seeing on this thread about spraying wheat @egbert is a surprise 😮 It’s the equivalent of seeing the local Wesleyan Methodist Preacher stood at the bar buying everyone a beer 🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣
I thought you'd be impressed I knew I'd seen something odd in any arable crop!

Here...you're not a bit 'chapel' yerself are you?
 

casemx 270

Member
Location
East midlands
It so depends on the variety and what disease potential there is. T2 is the most cost efficient timing, but if there is not any disease present and the weather looks dry, why bother on crops that aren’t going to give a decent yield?

If there is disease present and the variety is susceptible, then give it a suitable rate of T2 to control the disease and provide some future protection, then shut the gate. T3’s are the least most cost effective unless it suddenly turns wet in June.

If the crop never looked promising earlier, but was disease free, hopefully you didn’t bother with a T1 and certainly not a T0.


Funny how we spend so much time talking about fungicides, when in reality they are the least most cost effective products we put through the sprayer, unless disease pressures are high.
We seem obsessed with the T timings. T0 is probable a waste of time now we have lost CTL. Only bother with a T1 as long as the crop has potential. As long as there is at leat some potential give it a T2 and only a T3 if there is potential and threatening wet weather in June.
If you have a particularly disease resistant variety, you’d be amazed how well it will do without much, if any fungicides, unless it is a particularly wet weather year.
our problem or should I say my problem is my employer likes milling wheats mainly Skyfall and Zyatt both yellow rust varieties and yellow rust has been and still is present so T0 T 1 have been aimed at this so I can see a payback and I will include teb at T 2 but what to partner it with ? Folpet prosaro and ???
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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