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Yellow Barley

Discussion in 'Cropping' started by Fuzzy, Feb 7, 2019.

  1. Fuzzy

    Fuzzy Member

    Location:
    Bedfordshire
    My winter barley (Orwell) is not looking great at the moment, it established well and before Christmas looked very good, but since then it looks like it has had a dose of roundup. Is the best way to sort it out to put some N on when conditions allow ?
     
  2. farmerm

    farmerm Member

    Location:
    Shropshire
    Barley doesn’t like winter! Best to close eyes to it until the ground conditions and temperature allows some N+S. Mine has lovely green patches, of wild oats :facepalm:
     
  3. Fuzzy

    Fuzzy Member

    Location:
    Bedfordshire
    Only volunteer beans in mine (so far), i think the liberator has done a good job on Blackgrass but hit the barley hard!!
     
  4. farmerm

    farmerm Member

    Location:
    Shropshire
    What’s Blackgrass? ;) Though I shouldn’t get cocky it will only take one or a few plants to sneak past my diligent rouging!
     
  5. J 1177

    J 1177 Member

    Location:
    Durham, UK
    My orwel did the same. I gave it some mg and some nutriphite at a fortnight ago. It's kept it going but it's hardly dark green. Il chuck some mop and a bag of urea on it at the end of feb
     
  6. farmerm

    farmerm Member

    Location:
    Shropshire
    Fertilising in feb... you lucky boys ground farmers. I would be dragging my steps
     
  7. Shutesy

    Shutesy Moderator

    Location:
    Stansted
    Dont worry mine looks the same, weirdly the heavier the land the worse it is, some bits on some gravelly land looks nice and green. Will be getting NPK and S, late Feb I would think, cant travel on it atm.
     
  8. J 1177

    J 1177 Member

    Location:
    Durham, UK
    It's not often.. I got on last year a day before the beast from the east. I thought I'd wasted the fert but it did it good in the end. Now iv declared il put it on in Feb it will pee down for a month.
     
    fredf likes this.
  9. average farmer

    Location:
    North Notts
    My Orwell sounds much like yours. It’s been going off for over a month now. The funky the other side of the road looks a lovely shade of green. Both same land drilled the same day. Lots of mildew in the Orwell
     
  10. jondear

    jondear Member

    Location:
    Devon
    Barley yellow in Feb whatever next ! ;):whistle:
     
  11. Fuzzy

    Fuzzy Member

    Location:
    Bedfordshire
    jan2019 016.JPG jan2019 015.JPG
     
    gone likes this.
  12. It needs some warm dry weather!!

    Get some magphos K and manganese on if you are really that concerned.
     
    Andrew K likes this.
  13. Fuzzy

    Fuzzy Member

    Location:
    Bedfordshire
    I think it has picked up since i looked at it a couple of days ago and it has been a bit warmer 8-10c, the pictures taken today with bright sunshine make it look greener than it is.. so maybe i was worrying unnecessarily, but i will give it a sniff of magphos K and manganese when i can travel just to help keep the tillers.
     
    Andrew K and ollie989898 like this.
  14. jondear

    jondear Member

    Location:
    Devon
  15. shakerator

    shakerator Member

    Location:
    LINCS
    Wheat has gone mucky since the hard frosts. Always same in feb. Day length encouraging growth soil temperatures holding back nutrients
     
  16. A fair bit of wheat has gone ill around here recently, as others have mentioned, day length is changing and the soils are still wet and very very cold.
     
  17. Still Farming

    Still Farming Member

    Location:
    Glamorgan Wales
    Any Aphidcide applied ?
     
  18. It would be too early to see symptoms of BYDV yet in my view.

    This is typical barleyitis/cereal 'winter disease' where it gets cold and wet and looks worse for wear, can be a bit scary because often it happens so fast. It doesn't help having crops sown early and into a warm dry autumn, the crop gets way ahead of itself with a lot of foliage and the next minute you look around after Christmas and the stuff is either riddled with mildew or gone yellow and stringy, or both. It often recovers spontaneously as the soils warm and dry out but it is something to be mindful off, the stuff can literally fade out to near nothing if you leave it and leave it.

    In a few weeks once the nitrogen is on and the sun comes out it will be a different crop entirely; a lot of that foliage you see there won't even see the light of day in a few months.

    I would not go slapping maximum rates of trace element products on because it all costs money and the effects are often transient, there is also the question of whether it will actually translate into higher yields at this stage.
     
  19. Still Farming

    Still Farming Member

    Location:
    Glamorgan Wales
    Just asking as process of elimination.
     
  20. Zippy768

    Zippy768 Member

    Location:
    Dorset/Wilts
    Mines yellow to :rolleyes:.
    Barley being barley I suppose
     
    Flat 10 likes this.

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