Yet another student research project - are you planning on shifting towards producing less meat or dairy?

Mathilde

Member
Hello!

To perpetuate the cliché of students coming to ask for your views on various aspects of your work, I would love to hear your views if the question in my title resonates with you. I've been advised by the moderation team to post about my project in this section.

I'm a student at the University of Winchester writing my final dissertation.

Based on the increasing recommendations from health and climate scientists, the National Food Strategy, and the like, according to which England needs to produce and consume fewer animal products (less and better, regenerative models, more focus on plant-based options, etc.), my project explores the practical implications of this idea for farmers, and the opportunities through which policy instruments can help producers. I'm also basing this project on reports indicating that animal product alternatives are set to disrupt animal agriculture much more abruptly than most people think—including me until recently!

I'm only focusing on England because it's easier to keep a narrow focus than fit the differences of the already complex farming sector over all 4 states, but if anyone from outside England wants to share their views, I'd welcome that too as I'm sure it would still be relevant.

Despite the "decreasing the production of animal products" theme of my research, I know people are usually deeply attached to what they do, and I fully respect that; my objective isn't to tell people who are happy producing animal products they shouldn't keep farming animals (I can't emphasise that enough!)—but with all the pressures I mentioned above, it seems likely to me that some farmers might, in the near future, change their business models by emphasising crops, keeping lower stocking densities, diversifying by planting trees for carbon capture, etc., either to stay profitable, be eligible for ELM payments or for other business or personal reasons.

What my project asks is, how can English policy offer to farmers who want to reduce their volume of production of animal products a just transition amidst all these challenges and changes? Would such producers say they would mostly need ELM support, diversification grants, measures to improve value chain fairness and trade protection, advice, and/or any number of other possible useful tools?

I'm interviewing researchers and people who work on the policy side, but obviously what I am most interested in is what farmers interested in shifting away from animal-heavy production models have to say. There's plenty of research and policy declarations on this general theme, but not a lot of concern for how that would all work for farmers, and I'm really hoping I can put together some useful conclusions as to what would be helpful to them.
I'd therefore be super happy if anyone on TFF who might find this topic interesting would share their insights with me. I'm conducting online interviews this month; if anyone wanted to participate but would prefer just to answer a couple of questions by email to save time, for instance, that would be fine too.

If you have any questions or would like to consult the information sheet I've prepared for participants to find out more, please message me (or email me directly - [email protected]).

Thanks so much for reading!

Mathilde, from Devon
 

topground

Member
Location
North Somerset.
Following the scientifically dubious Eat Lancet report funded by multinational food processors interested in boosting their profits, the lie that meat and dairy contributes significantly to global warming and climate change is perpetrated. Joseph Goebbels was right when he said ‘repeat a lie often enough it will be taken as fact’ ( or something like that)
In pursuing research that assumes that meat and dairy are bad you have ignored the basic science you were taught as a schoolchild, namely the carbon cycle.
Other than the disciples of the dangerous amalgam of a religion and an eating disorder that is the vegan doctrine, sensible people realise that meat and dairy provide the nutrients essential to human health and will carry on as normal.
I understand that Lewis Hamilton is poorly, he thinks due to long covid, more likely his conversion to veganism is the cause as his body is not receiving the nutrients it needs.
Your research would be better directed towards establishing the level of ill health, particularly amongst young women due to their diets being deficient in meat and dairy.
Who is finding your research?
 

Mathilde

Member
Hello Topground,
Not that your abusive reply should earn you any attention or respect but I'm not like you, I treat everyone with respect, so I'll respond. You make a poor case for your views when all you have to say to a polite student is "you don't think like me so by definition you are diseased, weak, probably a Nazi, probably gullible and stupid, and funded by some kind of evil party".
I am funding my own research, which sadly you have completely misunderstood, and much of it is informed by the work of advocates for animal farming, like Simon Fairlie.
Best wishes.
 

Mathilde

Member
PS: I'm not sure the "people of colour and young women lack judgment" remark is a particularly edifying contribution either. I would love to read the peer-reviewed research to that effect that no doubt informs your expert opinion, however, that sounds profound and rational.
 

Mathilde

Member
Hey there SilliamWhale,
Thanks for sharing your view. That's what I love about our times, we all get to choose what feels right, at least to some extent. Eat meat, don't eat meat, there's something for everyone!

And if the ELMs can help you protect nature while also allowing your business to thrive, that's great! I get the sense that the new policies are attracting a wide range of reactions so I'm glad if they can work for you. Take care.
 

melted welly

Member
Location
DD9.
Hello Topground,
Not that your abusive reply should earn you any attention or respect but I'm not like you, I treat everyone with respect, so I'll respond. You make a poor case for your views when all you have to say to a polite student is "you don't think like me so by definition you are diseased, weak, probably a Nazi, probably gullible and stupid, and funded by some kind of evil party".
I am funding my own research, which sadly you have completely misunderstood, and much of it is informed by the work of advocates for animal farming, like Simon Fairlie.
Best wishes.
Abusive reply?

Then you go on and insinuate that the member called you a nazi…….🙄

I read one of the speils from one of these “food chain disrupters” and they seem to revel in causing rural and associated food chain job losses. Farming is by far and large individual businesses, the industry supports an intricate web of ancillary trades, businesses. The aim for the countryside is the removal of animals and ultimately reversion of land to wilding in order to cut emissions, whilst at the same time building factories and laboratories in which to create artificial versions of stuff that happens naturally.

It seems like total folly, systematically dismantle our food supply chain then hand that responsibility over to a handful of multinational processors and pharmaceutical businesses to fill the gap. How’s that gonna end?

The anti-meat agenda is peppered with dodgy stats, selective presentations and outright lies. What’s the next step? It’ll be outdoor veg, grown in that bacteria and fungi laden soil, better off produced in a sterile lab. Then we all become allergic to everything and deficient in things we didn’t think to include in the prescription meals. Spring water? Eurrgh, turns out that comes out of the ground 🤮………

Have you seen the film idiocracy?


At least they weren’t as stupid as to get rid of the cattle!
 

hill shepherd

Member
Livestock Farmer
Hello Topground,
Not that your abusive reply should earn you any attention or respect but I'm not like you, I treat everyone with respect, so I'll respond. You make a poor case for your views when all you have to say to a polite student is "you don't think like me so by definition you are diseased, weak, probably a Nazi, probably gullible and stupid, and funded by some kind of evil party".
I am funding my own research, which sadly you have completely misunderstood, and much of it is informed by the work of advocates for animal farming, like Simon Fairlie.
Best wishes.
Which part of Topgrounds post did you find abusive? I've read it three times now and failed to find the abusive part
 

Lincoln75

Member
Based on the increasing recommendations from health and climate scientists, the National Food Strategy, and the like, according to which England needs to produce and consume fewer animal products (less and better, regenerative models, more focus on plant-based options, etc.), my project explores the practical implications of this idea for farmers, and the opportunities through which policy instruments can help producers. I'm also basing this project on reports indicating that animal product alternatives are set to disrupt animal agriculture much more abruptly than most people think—including me until recently!
That paragraph would not be accepted by your lecturers as you are trying to sway opinion , a scientific study should be just that , it sounds like you've already decided your findings before you've done any research or written your dissertation, it`s a 29% / fail from me.
 
Location
Devon
Hi Mathilde,
Firstly, I take issue with your response to Topground. It doesn't seem to be edited in anyway and I simply do not believe you have interpreted a good reply in a reasonable way.

The basic message I think you'll get from farmers is that we actually understand nature and the environment better than many of the people writing the recommendations that you mentioned which are generally orchestrated and financed by corporation's that wish to supply an alternative.

Livestock are a self-regenerating source of food, clothing, insulation and thousands of other products which are often oil-based alternatives and the inputs can be sustainable, namely grass and water.

I'm sure most of us would consider it a dereliction of our duty and responsibility to the environment, to drastically reduce livestock numbers.
 

puppet

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
sw scotland
I see the CEO of plant-based meat company Beyond Meat claiming their burgers use 99% less water and 93% less land than beef and livestock farming creates 14% of global emissions.
All reported on BBC and all completely wrong for the UK but the public just soak up these figures.
 
Hey there SilliamWhale,
Thanks for sharing your view. That's what I love about our times, we all get to choose what feels right, at least to some extent. Eat meat, don't eat meat, there's something for everyone!

And if the ELMs can help you protect nature while also allowing your business to thrive, that's great! I get the sense that the new policies are attracting a wide range of reactions so I'm glad if they can work for you. Take care.

I think meat is a superfood the qualities of which I think we are underestimating at our peril.
 
I see the CEO of plant-based meat company Beyond Meat claiming their burgers use 99% less water and 93% less land than beef and livestock farming creates 14% of global emissions.
All reported on BBC and all completely wrong for the UK but the public just soak up these figures.

I'd never touch a plant based burger unless it was a genuinely home made one. Why would you want that processed crap? This is a beyond meat burger ingredients: water, pea protein, expeller-pressed canola oil, refined coconut oil, rice protein, natural flavors, cocoa butter, mung bean protein, methylcellulose, potato starch, apple extract, pomegranate extract, salt, potassium chloride, vinegar, lemon juice concentrate, sunflower lecithin, beet juice extract - I'd genuinely rather have a lamb chop, sirloin steak or piece of roast pork.
 
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Lincoln75

Member
Mad dash into Tesco the other night , grabbed bread . milk and as I`d missed lunch a pack of mini pork pies to munch on the way home , one bite told me something was wrong, `kin disgusting so I then read the packet "Plant based pie" :sick: never again :ROFLMAO: .
 

Update on the Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot

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Update on the Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot

Written by Lisa Applin

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In July, we opened the applications window for farmers to join our Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot.

The Sustainable Farming Incentive is 1 of the 3 new environmental land management schemes. It sits alongside the future Local Nature Recovery and Landscape Recovery schemes.

Through the Sustainable Farming Incentive, farmers will be paid for environmentally sustainable actions – ones that are simple to do and do not require previous agri-environment scheme experience.

We are piloting the scheme to...
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