Are there any opportunities left?

hoff135

Member
Location
scotland
Have been agricultural contracting for a number of years. Never in a big way, just a side line. More and more people trying to get into it. Id say there will soon be as many balers as fields round here.

Looking at maybe changing direction and getting into more groundworks. But again theres diggers poping up everywhere. But i get a steady amount of work with my little 3ton machine.

Failing that what else? Im in my mid 30s. No debt, no kids, not to many worries. Will inherit a small farm which i run just now which provides a very modest living which i could easily top up with casual work here and there.

However id really like to start and run a proper business rather than just stay at the same level all the time. Given im not responsible for a family etc and have a good base here youd think someone willing to work and push things would have a chance but its very difficult. Everything is done to death. Local village has gone from 1 to 5 joiners in the past few years. All people setting up on their own.

Whats left to do?

I feel a bit down that ive not actually achieved very much apart from knock my pan in for little reward.

Any inspiration?

Add: farm shops/ touristy things are not really my cup of tea.
 

Robt

Member
Location
Suffolk
Forget buying machines , just drive for them that have do a good job and charge a fair price you will be better off less hassle and can concentrate on your own stuff as much as you like.
Ignore this short sighted advice. There is money in anything as long as you are prepared to work for it and charge the correct rate. I’d say look at jobs people hate! Look at jobs that are very labour intensive that you can somehow mechanise. If you follow ( which you aren’t ) you’ll lose money. If you are happy to drive other peoples kit and make them money ( which you aren’t ) then crack on. To say contractors make no money simply isn’t correct . How. Many have gone bust over the last 10 years
 

Hilly

Member
Ignore this short sighted advice. There is money in anything as long as you are prepared to work for it and charge the correct rate. I’d say look at jobs people hate! Look at jobs that are very labour intensive that you can somehow mechanise. If you follow ( which you aren’t ) you’ll lose money. If you are happy to drive other peoples kit and make them money ( which you aren’t ) then crack on. To say contractors make no money simply isn’t correct . How. Many have gone bust over the last 10 years
I didn’t say they make no money you cheeky t wat.
 

Robt

Member
Location
Suffolk
I didn’t say they make no money you cheeky t wat.
Ha ha! But some say on here that all they do is spend every hour driving machines to pay the finance and make no money! I know a quite a few that live very well and have very sustainable businesses !
 

Hilly

Member
Dont know. 30k?
I have all the stuff to reseed fields, plough, cultivate sow etc.

95hp and 160hp tractor

3ton digger

Plus a few other things.

Never went the baler route cos everyone is at it
If you already have the gear worth a try , but good money can be had driving for others and if their is a lot of them already I’d bet they will be desperate for self employed good opperators and that will be stress free debt free and allow you to do more with your own land .
 

kill

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
South West
Buy a 3 ton digger and get drainage and foundations in to floor level. A friend of mine do’s this as sub work for local builders as builders these days don’t wanta get their boots muddy and are happy to pay strong money to someone else to do the dirty work cause basically they are too lazy and he’s always busy and can charge whatever he wants pretty much.
 
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hoff135

Member
Location
scotland
If you already have the gear worth a try , but good money can be had driving for others and if their is a lot of them already I’d bet they will be desperate for self employed good opperators and that will be stress free debt free and allow you to do more with your own land .
Already been contracting for 6 or 7 years.

My best customer retired. Another changed what the were doing and not ploughing anymore.

Im not losing money and im not doing big acreages. But by the time the bills are paid theres not much in it and it wont ever expand given how many are at the same thing.
 

Robt

Member
Location
Suffolk
Already been contracting for 6 or 7 years.

My best customer retired. Another changed what the were doing and not ploughing anymore.

Im not losing money and im not doing big acreages. But by the time the bills are paid theres not much in it and it wont ever expand given how many are at the same thing.
Good that you see that, give it up! Let the others fight it out. Find a job that others aren’t doing.! No point being busy as hell, no life and no money!
 

hoff135

Member
Location
scotland
Buy a 3 ton digger and get drainage and foundations in to floor level. A friend of mine do’s this as sub work for local builders as builders these days don’t wanta get their boots muddy and are happy to pay strong money to someone else to do the dirty work cause basically they are too lazy and he’s always busy.
I have a 3 ton digger, and it does quite a bit of work. I lose a lot of work because its too small.

I want to buy a 8 ton with breaker/grab etc and go from there.

But i need to get away from agri and more into construction side of things.

I once tidied up behind network rail after they did a job on my land. I charged what i thought was a pretty hefty bill. He told me after the other contractors would have been double that. I was offered more work but i didnt have the right tickets
 

Early moves to target wild oats

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Growers and agronomists now face the dilemma of an early application to remove competition from emerged wild oats, or holding off to allow more weeds to germinate.

Syngenta grassweeds technical manager, Georgina Wood, urges Axial Pro treatment as soon as conditions allow, once weeds are actively growing.

“That offers the chance to control wild oats more cost effectively at lower rates, whilst there is still the flexibility to tailor application rates up to 0.82 l/ha for larger or over wintered weeds and difficult situations.

“The variability of crops and situations this season means decisions for appropriate Axial Pro rates and application techniques will need to be made on a field-by-field basis,” she advised.

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Miss Wood urges...
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