Butterflies in 2018

Discussion in 'Agricultural Matters' started by Bald Rick, Jun 19, 2018.

  1. MrNoo

    MrNoo Member

    Location:
    Cirencester
    Spraying off the OSR and they're everywhere, lovely to see, swallows still building nests as they were in a large group taking away damp soil and bits of straw/grass/moss where I fill the sprayer up, clean water, so opened the tap up so it should last them a while.
    Hedgehog in the garden is doing well, suspect there maybe more than one by the amount of food it's consuming every eve, water out for him too.
    Only seen one brood of partridge, no pheasant and no English yet but hope we will see them once we start getting the crops off.
     
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  2. Bruce Almighty

    Location:
    Heart of England
    Lots of cabbage whites about yesterday
     
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  3. wanton dwarf

    wanton dwarf Member

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  4. primmiemoo

    primmiemoo Member

    Location:
    Devon
    Plenty of six-spot burnet moths, some high octane commas ~ wouldn't've identified them had not one pitched on a leaf, tortoiseshells, red admirals, small skippers, more meadow browns ~ I always forget the females have browny-orange rims to their wings and think they're another species.

    Yet to see a peacock at home. The buddleia is finally in flower, so they'll be around soon, and stay to use the ivy flowers.
    Soon be time for marbled whites.
     
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  5. Kidds

    Kidds Member

    Location:
    Warrington
    136840BE-ACC5-4D75-8E2E-46182065951E.jpeg
    Dozens here
     
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  6. Wendy10

    Wendy10 Member

    Location:
    Carmarthenshire
    Plenty of the flippin things around hear.
     
  7. The Agrarian

    The Agrarian Member

    Location:
    Co Antrim
    Going by the list of butterflies @Princess Pooper speaks of, I must be walking about with my eyes shut. And I really regret that, as I love nature. It's the busy-ness disease.

    The only ones I recognise as common here are red admirals and cabbage white. But my eye was drawn this week when doing a spot of fencing to a bunch of interesting caterpillars on ragwort. Google tells me it's the cinnibar moth. I don't recall having ever seen the pattern.
     
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  8. DaveB

    DaveB Member

    Location:
    Worcs
    Always lots of cinnabar moths and their caterpillars here. At the end of April there were lots of these caterpillars about feeding on Comfrey. I didn't
    recognise them, but a quick Google revealed that they are the larvae of the Scarlet Tiger moth. The moths should be around soon.

    IMG_20180425_105141 (1309 x 982).jpg
     
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  9. Sonoftheheir

    Sonoftheheir Member

    Location:
    West Suffolk
    There’s a lot of bloody silver Y moth about here!
     
  10. Old Boar

    Old Boar Member

    Location:
    West Wales
    Loads here, I am sure the collective noun for butterflies is not "loads" though! I vote for "flutterby" of butterfly! I left the bathroom light on and the window open yesterday and could hardly fight my way into the room for the whisper of moths!
     
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  11. Bald Rick

    Bald Rick Member

    Location:
    Anglesey
    Nope, don't have a kaleidoscope, swarm, rainbow or rabble of butterflies here. Neither numbers or variety.

    Got a few flying ants in the house but I suspect they don't count
     
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  12. DaveB

    DaveB Member

    Location:
    Worcs
    Many things have changed, I remember, growing up in an unheated house in the country in the 50s and 60s there were always butterflies hibernating in the house. Old fashioned beds, iron framed, were a certain place to find Small Tortoiseshell and others hanging upside down on the underside of the mattresses. These ideal, cool but dry environments have all but disappeared with modern life.
     
  13. Kidds

    Kidds Member

    Location:
    Warrington
    Erm.... they are still here. Maybe modern life hasn't caught up with me yet.
     
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  14. Princess Pooper

    Location:
    East Mids
    we still get plenty, cold largely unheated farmhouse with a not overly houseproud keeper! :rolleyes: We even have one iron framed bedstead!
     
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  15. primmiemoo

    primmiemoo Member

    Location:
    Devon
    There's something to be said for being steward of an agrihovel ~ and it's reassuring to discover others.

    Currently experiencing caterpillar confusion: there's a goodly flutter of six-spot burnet moths, and also their dangerous looking yellow and black striped caterpillars which are guzzling marsh ragwort as though there'll be no tomorrow.

    Or so I thought ...
    ... before looking at photos of six-spot burnet moth caterpillars and realising the pattern on those aren't the same as the ones in field.

    The yellow and black caterpillars in the field have stripes that run around the girth of the body ... which makes them caterpillars of cinnabar moths??

    How likely is it that both species are present in the same field?
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2018 at 11:37 AM
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  16. Bald Rick

    Bald Rick Member

    Location:
    Anglesey
    Very useful for tying things to ............ or so I am lead to believe
     
  17. Princess Pooper

    Location:
    East Mids
    :eek:
     
  18. DaveB

    DaveB Member

    Location:
    Worcs
    The black and yellow banded caterpillars are definitely cinnabar moth, ragwort is their favorite food plant, but they may commonly found on Groundsel as well, the moths are similar to Burnets at a glance but easily distinguished side by side. Quite likely to find them in the same field.
     
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