Cover crop oats

Bob lincs

Member
Arable Farmer
We have a field that was due to be drilled with beans this spring so in the backend we drilled a strip 21m wide diagonally across it with 30kg/ha of oats as a cheap cover experiment. Over the winter we had a bit of a shuffle around with our cropping so this field is now drilled with spring wheat . When we drilled it with our sabre tine the strip with the oats was definitely wetter but drillled ok the difference now in the spring wheat is like chalk and cheese . The plant numbers are roughly the same but where the oats were the wheat is really struggling, I know oats aren’t ideal in front of cereal crops but didn’t expect this much of a bad effect . Anyone know why .
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ConanPB

Member
Could it be that the oats have scavenged any nitrogen in the soil? maybe allopathic effect of the growing oats added to the poorer sowing conditions ?Combination of both perhaps
 

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
Cereal after a cereal cover crop is a big no to the point where if there is a lot of volunteers in a broadleaf cover I would take them out.
 

tr250

Member
Location
Northants
Could it be that the oats have scavenged any nitrogen in the soil? maybe allopathic effect of the growing oats added to the poorer sowing conditions ?Combination of both perhaps
☝Pretty much this. Also decicated at the wrong time I’d guess the oats want to look like they do now at drilling
 
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4course

Member
Location
north yorks
we have been experimenting with cover crops -catch crops this last few years however now the need to have them to comply with bps are history cant see us bothering any more unless a very early harvest or having a major grass weed problem that currently we dont have. we did see a benefit in following crop yield but by the time costs and pressure on workoad was taken int account not worth the chew unless grazed by the golden hoof
 

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
we have been experimenting with cover crops -catch crops this last few years however now the need to have them to comply with bps are history cant see us bothering any more unless a very early harvest or having a major grass weed problem that currently we dont have. we did see a benefit in following crop yield but by the time costs and pressure on workoad was taken int account not worth the chew unless grazed by the golden hoof
Catch crops are great, mine cost about £12/ha on seed and a pass with the drill. Harvesting free energy when usually the soil is brown. Over winter cover crops not so convinced about can be more of a hindrance for spring drilling on heavy land if you don’t manage them properly. Any of these crops don’t need to cost much though, some of the prices from seed houses for mixtures are a complete non starter, you could plough 3 times for the same cost as the seed.
 

4course

Member
Location
north yorks
Catch crops are great, mine cost about £12/ha on seed and a pass with the drill. Harvesting free energy when usually the soil is brown. Over winter cover crops not so convinced about can be more of a hindrance for spring drilling on heavy land if you don’t manage them properly. Any of these crops don’t need to cost much though, some of the prices from seed houses for mixtures are a complete non starter, you could plough 3 times for the same cost as the seed.
agree with you that catch crops are more rewarding than cover crops but bear in mind ive a shorter weather/time window than suffolk up here ,2 weeks later harvest and the need to be sown up at least a week if not a fortnight before which is why unless conditions/timing is right as much as i like them cant see a place for them without being pressured to do so
 

DairyGrazing

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
North West
Catch crops are great, mine cost about £12/ha on seed and a pass with the drill. Harvesting free energy when usually the soil is brown. Over winter cover crops not so convinced about can be more of a hindrance for spring drilling on heavy land if you don’t manage them properly. Any of these crops don’t need to cost much though, some of the prices from seed houses for mixtures are a complete non starter, you could plough 3 times for the same cost as the seed.
What catch crops are you doing?
 

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
I’ve done it after osr and wheat then drilled wheat in. I’m going to do similar after some winter barley this year and plant early wheat into it
Basically trying to grow more cereals as they are just so much more reliable than osr, beans, Linseed etc but use the catch and cover crops to get the diversity. Will probably start spending abit more money on them now we have learnt more on how to deal with them
 

BigBarl

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
South Notts
We have a field that was due to be drilled with beans this spring so in the backend we drilled a strip 21m wide diagonally across it with 30kg/ha of oats as a cheap cover experiment. Over the winter we had a bit of a shuffle around with our cropping so this field is now drilled with spring wheat . When we drilled it with our sabre tine the strip with the oats was definitely wetter but drillled ok the difference now in the spring wheat is like chalk and cheese . The plant numbers are roughly the same but where the oats were the wheat is really struggling, I know oats aren’t ideal in front of cereal crops but didn’t expect this much of a bad effect . Anyone know why . View attachment 958316View attachment 958317View attachment 958318
we did similar and got similar results. Fallow 2020 and put a black oat & phacelia cover on over summer, destroyed good and early and sown with winter wheat. This field is by far the worst piece of wheat on the farm and has been all winter and spring. Soil type is reclaimed clay, sown with KV tineseeder. Going to keep cereals out of the cover in the future and keep trying just with legumes, brassicas and phacelia.
 

Shutesy

Moderator
Arable Farmer
We have a field that was due to be drilled with beans this spring so in the backend we drilled a strip 21m wide diagonally across it with 30kg/ha of oats as a cheap cover experiment. Over the winter we had a bit of a shuffle around with our cropping so this field is now drilled with spring wheat . When we drilled it with our sabre tine the strip with the oats was definitely wetter but drillled ok the difference now in the spring wheat is like chalk and cheese . The plant numbers are roughly the same but where the oats were the wheat is really struggling, I know oats aren’t ideal in front of cereal crops but didn’t expect this much of a bad effect . Anyone know why . View attachment 958316View attachment 958317View attachment 958318
Read this thread if you get the chance:

Basically decaying cereal residues can have an allopathic effect on newly sown cereal crops, oats having about the strongest effect. If you had sown beans you would probably have been ok.
 

T Hectares

Member
Location
Berkshire
This SB is following a Oat + Phacelia CC
The line in the middle is the join between an Avatar DD on the left and a Kockerling allrounder pass and drilled with a sprinter on the right
The difference with yours @Bob lincs here is that the cover was grazed off pre drilling
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jh.

Member
Location
fife
I had 3 field of volunteer storm sown spring oats . I thought winter would kill them off but they survived . It was then looking like they might go to a local AD plant but the weather was catchy and they turned yellow mid March possibly from lack of N , so got sprayed off . All into spring barley . Some mintill and power harrow combi drilled. Avatar demo , claydon twin tine with LD set up and then with ripper tines . All drills fert down spout . At the moment the avatar is the best emergence as I think the others have suffered with lack of moisture , while the avatar hasn't lost as much . It's almost like the oats have over dried the soil and highlighted this .
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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