Fertiliser Price Tracker

county down

Member
Location
downpatrick
Were they the bags that held 2 1/4 hundredweight?
I’ve heard the story many a times of my late uncle carrying these sacks of grain on his back from the threshing machine, across the yard and up the granary steps to empty them.
On one occasion on his return to the threshing machine they all stopped to watch him catch hold of the bag, he knew something was up but carried on, yep something was up but he dug in deep and carried on as close to normal, across the yard and up the steps, each step getting harder and and harder but determination kept him going, he made it to the top, and emptied the bag , complete with two 56llb weights inside.

Wonder how many farm workers could manage a day carrying 2 1/4 hundredweight sacks nowadays
they would have more sense some thick men them times
 

thorpe

Member
Were they the bags that held 2 1/4 hundredweight?
I’ve heard the story many a times of my late uncle carrying these sacks of grain on his back from the threshing machine, across the yard and up the granary steps to empty them.
On one occasion on his return to the threshing machine they all stopped to watch him catch hold of the bag, he knew something was up but carried on, yep something was up but he dug in deep and carried on as close to normal, across the yard and up the steps, each step getting harder and and harder but determination kept him going, he made it to the top, and emptied the bag , complete with two 56llb weights inside.

Wonder how many farm workers could manage a day carrying 2 1/4 hundredweight sacks nowadays
none
 

Farma Parma

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Northumberlandia
Were they the bags that held 2 1/4 hundredweight?
I’ve heard the story many a times of my late uncle carrying these sacks of grain on his back from the threshing machine, across the yard and up the granary steps to empty them.
On one occasion on his return to the threshing machine they all stopped to watch him catch hold of the bag, he knew something was up but carried on, yep something was up but he dug in deep and carried on as close to normal, across the yard and up the steps, each step getting harder and and harder but determination kept him going, he made it to the top, and emptied the bag , complete with two 56llb weights inside.

Wonder how many farm workers could manage a day carrying 2 1/4 hundredweight sacks nowadays
Incredibly Strong men back then, my late father used to say much the same i dont think he lifted these 16st bags iam sure thats what he said they were,but his eldest brother did & done the same as you have said carried them up granary steps.
Unreal how they did it.
Credit to them they knew nothing else
Poor man in question sadly passed away at 57 & that was in 1987
So any comments about hard work never killed anyone just think again.
 

CORNFLAKE

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Warwickshire
I remember when a young and keen fertiliser rep kept pestering my father about fertiliser ( in the time of small bags ) and my father got a bit fed up of him so he said I’ll only order some if you come and unload it with us thinking he would get the message and bugger off. Surprisingly he agreed and true to his word arrived when the lorry did and helped us. It paid off as my father was impressed and he ended up with our feed, seed and fertiliser orders for several years until he left for pastures new.
 

Full of bull(s)

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
North Yorkshire
Yes you are right. Never had a weigh ticket with a load of fert before, they should issue you one tho because they are probably fiddling a few kgs on every load
It doesn’t mean that much if you get one unless it’s on site and they are weighed in and out. I buy all my corn in and fortunately there is a public weighbridge within sight of my yard. Nearly every time they arrive unless from a merchant store they have weighed off there using a stated tare but don’t tell you until you look at the ticket. Oh it always weighs about that when I check is the usual answer, as I follow them back after tipping to make them tare off properly. Its been half a tonne out both ways before. Every one of those loads has been sent on its way by a farmer knowing no better
 

Barleymow

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Ipswich
Would everyone that has there fertiliser bought and delivered, would they have normally been sorted at this time in previous years? (Asking for a "friend" that hasn't bought and is hoping for price drop a before april)
Normally order August/September for November delivery payment mid September 22. Ordered 20th September this yr 404 for straight n Delivered 4 weeks ago
 

homefarm

Member
Location
N.West
How is liquid fert sold now?

It was by the cu metre last time we used it.

My Daugher worked for a fuel supplier for a bit, the big paper mill who used an artic a day bought by weight.

She found out, weights and measures, allow a plus or minus tolerance on the pumps used to measure the fuel and they are always set in the sellers favour. Also volume varies with temperature quite a bit so you get less in summer than winter.
If we had a weigh bridge everything would be weighed in and out.
 

An Gof

Member
Location
Cornwall
How is liquid fert sold now?

It was by the cu metre last time we used it.

My Daugher worked for a fuel supplier for a bit, the big paper mill who used an artic a day bought by weight.

She found out, weights and measures, allow a plus or minus tolerance on the pumps used to measure the fuel and they are always set in the sellers favour. Also volume varies with temperature quite a bit so you get less in summer than winter.
If we had a weigh bridge everything would be weighed in and out.

Using the tolerance to your advantage 😉 …….. like the grain destination with two weighbridges where you weigh on one on the way in and the other on the way out 😡
 

PSQ

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Scottish Borders
The most frequent discrepancy we find with weights is where the end users weights are out by 80 - 120 kg, under or over our own farms tickets. I can only assume it’s them weighing the load in with the driver in the cab, and taring with him standing at the side as he puts his sheet on. Over a 5 or ten load contract we’ll get them both ways and the weights are near enough the same.
 

David.

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
J11 M40
Lampreys would love to turn up at our place about 5pm with a 10 ton load of 52 Regular in cwt bags, I would have been about 14 at the time I expect. The bags had to be stacked a special way in the back of the lean-to shed, so that we could run up the bags like steps to enable the bags to be stacked tight up to the roof sheets and not waste a cubic inch of space. The bags had a small splodge of glue like molasses applied to stop them slipping on the pallets before shrink wrapping was a thing, and it would get gormed all on your neck and shoulder.
Squirrel sacks or the ones with 2 purple stripes, are the ones I can remember handling corn in, as late as 1983. They would have been more like 1.75cwt though.
It was often my job as a teenager to perch on the top of the side of the 6 wheeler grain lorries of the day, and catch hold of the bottom corner of the sacks as they went over the end of the old Cook elevator and shake out the last of the corn and catch the sacks.
It wasn't driven by poverty, it was lack of inclination to improve. Gramp always had a nice car, and was moaning about paying income tax
 
Last edited:

county down

Member
Location
downpatrick
I remember when a young and keen fertiliser rep kept pestering my father about fertiliser ( in the time of small bags ) and my father got a bit fed up of him so he said I’ll only order some if you come and unload it with us thinking he would get the message and bugger off. Surprisingly he agreed and true to his word arrived when the lorry did and helped us. It paid off as my father was impressed and he ended up with our feed, seed and fertiliser orders for several years until he left for pastures new.
I remember when a young and keen fertiliser rep kept pestering my father about fertiliser ( in the time of small bags ) and my father got a bit fed up of him so he said I’ll only order some if you come and unload it with us thinking he would get the message and bugger off. Surprisingly he agreed and true to his word arrived when the lorry did and helped us. It paid off as my father was impressed and he ended up with our feed, seed and fertiliser orders for several years until he left for pastures new.
some difference between salesmen some became great friends and some of them you just could not wait to get the back of them
however i remember one dislikeable one arrived one day just after i had a good quote from my man asked did i need any fertiliser i told him he would be too dear anyway he asked what price i had been quoted i took my mans price and deducted £5 from it and said he had to beat it by a pound he looked at me and said okay i paid him there and then i was happy i knew he had made no profit
 

Old apprentice

Member
Arable Farmer
I'll take the 500kg ones back if there doing them
heheee No intentions of ever asking for 1000kg bags stuff that, there is enough weight to stang partialy under whilst cutting the things into a spreader
Just get a pice of pipe about 7 feet long weld a lug on end and Sharpe up cuts bags a treat and no going under bags with a knife for safety's sake do that .if you use a pice of stainless steel to sharpen keeps sharper longer.
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
Accountant has been bothering me about getting my (overdue) end of year accounts in so been collating prices of fertiliser and diesel that was in store in the Spring. Gas oil went into the tank at 42.2ppl and 28.2t of Lithan had been delivered in at £183/t.

I knew there was a reason I'd been putting off going back through it.:cry:
 

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