Fuel Supplier Update

Farmdeals

Member
We have had a couple of new fuel suppliers come online over the last few days. Some farmers will now have 4 quotes to choose from, but some will still have 1 or none. We continue to work on this, Scotland and Northern Ireland are the difficult places.

But please do log in again and check prices in your area. Some prices start at 10am and expire at 5pm, so if you log on outside those times you won't see them. We are working on the alert system to tell you when new suppliers come online in your area.
 

Chris F

Staff Member
Media
Location
Hammerwich
Another quick update - we now have the best coverage in the following areas:

County: Bedfordshire, England, GB
County: Berkshire, England, GB
County: Buckinghamshire, England, GB
County: Cambridgeshire, England, GB
County: Gloucestershire, England, GB
County: Hertfordshire, England, GB
County: Kent, England, GB
County: Northamptonshire, England, GB
County: Rutland, England, GB
County: Staffordshire, England, GB
County: Suffolk, England, GB
County: Warwickshire, England, GB
County: Worcestershire, England, GB

If you have friends in the those counties then please do invite them to join. The register on the website here as we are not recruiting other farmers: https://www.farmdeals.ag

If you could all invite 5 to 10 more farmers that would much be appreciated. It will also help you if they are local, as if you all buy fuel on the same day it can help drive a better price for all of you.
 
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Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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