Getting ridge and furrow out of a field?

Discussion in 'Agricultural Matters' started by Rabbit Wolverine, May 31, 2015.

  1. Rabbit Wolverine

    Location:
    East Midlands
    We have 12 acres of grass that needs re-seeding next year but it's got ridge and furrow which I want to get out as I want to be able to silage it.
    There are no environmental restrictions on it
    The field is very heavy clay (called Brickyard Bank) as it used to have a brickworks on it to supply the local estate
     
  2. multi power

    multi power Member

    Location:
    pembrokeshire
    How high are the ridges? Would a few passes with a big disc do the job
     
  3. Rabbit Wolverine

    Location:
    East Midlands
    Some of them are quite sharp, and tall, about 2 ft high, probably about 10 ft apart
     
  4. MrNoo

    MrNoo Member

    Location:
    Cirencester
    We did several fields back in the 70's, would think the ridges were a tad taller than yours. Used a Cat D5 with a blade, did the job. Still have one field in R&F but in environmental scheme.
     
  5. Y Fan Wen

    Y Fan Wen Member

    Location:
    N W Snowdonia
    Ridge and furrow was originally made by ploughing the same way every year, gradually shifting the soil up to the ridge. What about doing the opposite and turning the furrow down to the low points?
     
  6. Rabbit Wolverine

    Location:
    East Midlands
    I have though about this but the problem is that I think they re too high and they go in different directions in the field
     
  7. johnb5555

    johnb5555 Member

    Location:
    Co Durham
    Contractor just done 10 acre with discs, power harrow and leveller. Working at an angle to furrows is key I think. Though this field were only about 6-8 inches.
     
  8. Bull dozer and or big digger and a man that nos how to use it
     
  9. did acres years ago just start with a rig in the hollow and a furrow on top of ridge,is a pain but good practice:) for a ploughing match
     
  10. Ley253

    Ley253 Member

    Location:
    Bath
    Check topsoil depth before dozing anything! You wouldnt want strips of nice(not) clay on the top! ploughing with the openings in the furrows may be the only way.
     
    neilo, David., Nearly and 2 others like this.
  11. bert

    bert Member

    Location:
    n.yorks
    Try to keep the topsoil on top, we have a field that they say was steep rig and furrows and must have been levelled out badly, leaving subsoil on top, doesn't grow much to this day except for a few stripes where it must be proper topsoil
     
    David. and Henarar like this.
  12. Princess Pooper

    Location:
    East Mids
    If it's anything like ours (we've got over 200 acres) there will be 4-6 inches of wonderful fibrous topsoil and then several feet of heavy clay It may also not be underdrained and you may regret it for ever more. And such a pity that more of our rural heritage disappears. We mainly graze or make hay on ours but some we used to do big bale silage on with no probs. A neighbour got rid of his by dumping topsoil in the furrows which at least avoids bringing up the clay.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2015
  13. Ley253

    Ley253 Member

    Location:
    Bath
    One other thing, if levelled the surface area of the field will be much smaller than it is now, and may well lie wet for much longer.
     
    Hilly, multi power and The Ruminant like this.
  14. cat

    cat Member

    Location:
    aberdeenshire
    Always wanted to ask about these ridges, are they protected or can you level them as you please ?
     
  15. rose pilchett

    rose pilchett Member

    Location:
    ie
    i've done 20 acres before in 2011 with an old 4f reversible

    some older locals told me to plough slowly at approx 15 degree angle to the ridges

    then power harrowed twice then in with combi- again at a slight angle

    it was still fairly uneven on the worst bits at harvest- but we did not want to bring all of the clay up to the top straight away

    i combined it with 18ft header and i had to go easy the first year in some places- managed to scoop up the occasional bit of dirt here and there

    gave it a good dose of muck after then second year i ploughed at the different 15 degree angle, soil was then cultipressed in spring before spring barley

    I don't farm it anymore but i believe it is pretty level now and the contract farm outfit uses a 25 ft header fine
     
    multi power likes this.
  16. Y Fan Wen

    Y Fan Wen Member

    Location:
    N W Snowdonia
    It depends!!
     
  17. Princess Pooper

    Location:
    East Mids
    Most are not protected unless part of a larger Scheduled Ancient Monument. Some farmers are drawing a bit of money from them as they can be used to gain points in English stewardship schemes at least but then of course you must keep them for the duration of the agreement. If you go for any planning permission on a rig and furrow field then all of a sudden everyone starts jumping up and down about them and admittedly I would be very sad if they all disappeared, they tell us a lot about the old open field systems. floodandridges.JPG
     
    cat likes this.
  18. Sheep

    Sheep Member

    Location:
    Northern Ireland
    Landleveller.
     
  19. rose pilchett

    rose pilchett Member

    Location:
    ie
    no problem locally for large national leisure operators getting permission to level and fill 60acres with caravans (might be something to do with local lib dem MP being retained year in year out on 40k+ a year as a 'consultant')

    not a peep from environment agency/ dethra etc.
     
  20. PSQ

    PSQ Member

    I would dig a trench first so you know what your getting into. At £10k/ acre it would be a waste to fudge it up doing a botched job. I'd be tempted to take off the top soil with a 360 and level it before reinstating the top soil. But I'm fussy about soil quality.

    Edit: Having said that, I've got a serious texture problem in an area of an amalgamated field, the 1843 map shows it as ridge and furrow, and the modern satellite GAI maps show it as 'buggerd'. It doesn't take a genius to se that someone has screwed up the soil profile.
    Proceed carefully.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2015
    The Ruminant and Princess Pooper like this.

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