How late glyphosate before crop emergence?

DrWazzock

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
Anybody any experience of applying glyphosate post drilling and had a problem due to it catching the emerging crop?
I have done a couple of acres of beet as a trial just before the seedlings break through the surface in a particularly weedy patch so I guess I’ll soon know but just wondered if folk had any experiences good or bad.
As herbicide options become ever more limited I reckon it could be a useful tool but obviously there is a trade off between going too early and missing a lot of small weeds and going too late and killing the crop. Personally I think it’s a waste of time the day after drilling.
 

Matt77

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
East Sussex
Drilled my beans straight into grass last year, weather/work load stopped me spraying the grass off until the beans were up but still folded over, tipped them a bit but they all up and alive at mo, I know a bean a bit different to a cereal.
 

DrWazzock

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
Drilled my beans straight into grass last year, weather/work load stopped me spraying the grass off until the beans were up but still folded over, tipped them a bit but they all up and alive at mo, I know a bean a bit different to a cereal.
That’s later than I’d dare risk.
 

Matt77

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
East Sussex
I won’t lie, I had sleepless nights! but I also couldn’t bring myself to leave the fast growing rye grass as a companion crop!!!
 

Matt77

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
East Sussex
Yep, strip till drill, 1inch boot, wanted to drill it on the green so it passed through the drill well, had issues before with a dead mat on the top, this worked well, just a shame the weather turned immediately after drilling.
 

Lowland1

Member
Mixed Farmer
I do potatoes just before emergence and even if a few are poking through they seem to shrug it off. I’ve done maize however and even if you can’t see any seedlings emerging it seems to stunt the crop.
 

DrWazzock

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
I do potatoes just before emergence and even if a few are poking through they seem to shrug it off. I’ve done maize however and even if you can’t see any seedlings emerging it seems to stunt the crop.
I do wonder if there is some residual effect, despite it being said that it is broken down on contact with the soil. It won’t be instantaneous breakdown and so I think very susceptible plants could be damaged as they push through.
I sprayed off spring barley infested ploughing in November and it stayed clean as a whistle right through till we drilled in March.
 

solo

Member
Location
worcestershire
I nervously sprayed ryegrass off in an emerging crop of wheat as the cotyledons were just emerging. 24 hours later would have been too late according to the agronomist. It worked extremely well and the wheat grew on fine with the ryegrass issue sorted. I wouldn’t want to do it routinely as you could easily get the timing wrong.
 
the day before the leaf breaks through the coleoptile in cereals
half a day later is too late

i have done cereals 11 days post drilling when it is slow emerging
this windy weather will take us down to the wire

often the first emerged plants make up less than 10%of the final plants so if you use a robust seed rate knocking them off is not too serious
especially if bg has emerged on the surface
i find surface emerged black grass is a few days ahead of the cereal seed and is killed by the well timed glyphosate
 

BRBX

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
nottingham
Which one s advice do you follow?
Both for the bits they look after , ive not seen any detriment to crop from using it but one of them is adamant not to so thats what we do.
Some people spray blackgrass out of beans now relying on tbe waxy leaf to save the the bean , i wouldnt be brave enough for that but I have seen it work.
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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