How long between applying forefront and topping?

Andyt880

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Co. Down
As per the title, how long do I need to wait after spraying weeds with forefront until I can top the paddock off clean? I don’t want to cut the weed off before the spray has made it to the root. Mainly thistles I’m spraying for.
 

Andyt880

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Co. Down
Most of the Dow family of products stipulate at least 3 weeks before mowing to allow for full translocation iirc. In the absence of info on the label, I would suggest that would be the starting point?
I see people using it here on silage ground 10 to 14 days before cutting but I always wondered if it was giving it time to get to the root.
 

Andyt880

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Co. Down
It shouldn’t be used on silage ground, at all.
I know that’s what the label says but I’d say it’s commonly used for silage ground around here form what I can see.
It definitely seems to be the most effective spray to be used. I used thristlex and dock star last year on different areas and they all seem to be just as bad if not worse this year. The dock star definitely had no affect on whipping out any docks long term
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
I know that’s what the label says but I’d say it’s the most commonly used spray for silage ground around here form what I can see.
It definitely seems to be the most effective spray to be used. I used thristlex and dock star last year on different areas and they all seem to be just bad if not worse this year. The dock star definitely had no affect on whipping out any docks long term
It might be effective at controlling the weeds, but it was only relicensed under strict terms of use. If many are using it on silage ground, it will be removed from use soon enough.:(
 

Andyt880

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Co. Down
It might be effective at controlling the weeds, but it was only relicensed under strict terms of use. If many are using it on silage ground, it will be removed from use soon enough.:(
If the dung produced from the silage is kept on farm and spread back on grass land surely it shouldn’t be much of an issue?
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
If the dung produced from the silage is kept on farm and spread back on grass land surely it shouldn’t be much of an issue?
That’s not what it says on the label though, so anyone doing so is breaking the law. Even the dung from animals grazing that field is restricted to only being spread on grazing grass. Iirc silage can be taken the following year, but even then the dung can only be spread on grazing ground (unless the label has changed recently).
 
I know that’s what the label says but I’d say it’s commonly used for silage ground around here form what I can see.
It definitely seems to be the most effective spray to be used. I used thristlex and dock star last year on different areas and they all seem to be just as bad if not worse this year. The dock star definitely had no affect on whipping out any docks long term
I used Forefont some years ago when it first came out and it’s the only spray for established grassland I’ve used that wiped weeds out, mainly docks, and didn’t come back for several years, apart from sprays like legumex/alistell which were only used on new leys/ seedling socks.

I have since tried buying it but my agronomist simply won’t supply me, I’ve also tried buying it from Wynnstay but same story, they won’t supply it even though I assured them it was only for use on fields used for grazing,

It’s a bit frustrating as it means spraying annually is necessary which is good from a supplier/manufacturers point of view but not so good from an environmental point of view nor my bank balance
 

holwellcourtfarm

Member
Livestock Farmer
That’s not what it says on the label though, so anyone doing so is breaking the law. Even the dung from animals grazing that field is restricted to only being spread on grazing grass. Iirc silage can be taken the following year, but even then the dung can only be spread on grazing ground (unless the label has changed recently).
I wonder if folk doing that would lose Red Tractor status? Should do really, intentionally breaking very clear label conditions....
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
Does anyone know why it isn’t licensed for spot spraying?
Probably only because the manufacturer would need to do lots of trials and submit results to boxtickers, who would then decide if it was ok or not. The considerable investment wouldn’t be recovered from the market for decades, if then.
The same would apply for many/most other pesticides I suspect.
 
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Does anyone know why it isn’t licensed for spot spraying?
Something being applied by a spot sprayer is a whole different kettle of fish regarding safety compared to a boom sprayer. Now your operator is carrying the tank sloshing the stuff about and could be directly exposed to the spray. In a crop sprayer he is in a cab and should be protected by carbon filters. Very few products are licensed for knapsacks because of the additional hurdles involved. One stumbling point is eye exposure and this is why you won't see many products containing fluroxypyr licensed for knapsacks.
 

holwellcourtfarm

Member
Livestock Farmer
Something being applied by a spot sprayer is a whole different kettle of fish regarding safety compared to a boom sprayer. Now your operator is carrying the tank sloshing the stuff about and could be directly exposed to the spray. In a crop sprayer he is in a cab and should be protected by carbon filters. Very few products are licensed for knapsacks because of the additional hurdles involved. One stumbling point is eye exposure and this is why you won't see many products containing fluroxypyr licensed for knapsacks.
Paraquat was seen here as a safe product. Its dangers were well appreciated but when applied from a tractor cab they were controlled. In Africa, however, it was often applied by people in shorts and sandals who walked through the crop they'd sprayed. People died horrifically of its effects from absorbing it through the skin of their legs.
 

AGCO reports sales increase of 43.5% compared to 2020 figures

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Written by Agriland Team from Agriland

The tractor manufacturer AGCO, which consists of brands such as Challenger, Fendt, GSI, Massey Ferguson and Valtra, reported its results for the second quarter ending June 30, 2021.

Net sales for the second quarter were approximately $2.9 billion, an increase of approximately 43.5% compared to the second quarter of 2020.

AEM

Reported net income was $3.73/share for the second quarter of 2021, and adjusted...
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