Lungworm on outwintered yearlings

Discussion in 'Dairy Farming' started by Devon lad, Jan 8, 2017.

  1. Devon lad

    Devon lad Member

    Location:
    Mid Devon
    Does out wintering have a greater risk on lungworm infection in yearlings? Ours have been on kale since November and we lost one over Christmas and another is going downhill today. We've never had an issue in the 4 previous years, they we're ivermectin Jabbed in October, we normally just do them once and trodaxed in mid December. Any one else had any experience?
     
  2. Thick Farmer

    Thick Farmer Member

    Location:
    West Wales
    Need worming every 6 weeks when out.
     
  3. bovine

    bovine Member

    Location:
    North
    What makes you think its lungworm? Did the dead one get a PM?

    Bad year for pneumonia
     
  4. bovine

    bovine Member

    Location:
    North
    Rubbish. Absolute tosh.
     
    Sid, farmerste, jondear and 1 other person like this.
  5. In the pit

    In the pit Member

    How are you building immunity??
     
  6. Thick Farmer

    Thick Farmer Member

    Location:
    West Wales
    How many cattle do you own?
     
  7. bovine

    bovine Member

    Location:
    North
    What are your qualifications in veterinary parasitology?
     
    Greenasgrass likes this.
  8. Devon lad

    Devon lad Member

    Location:
    Mid Devon
    Well that did come to mind on the dead one, I did treat it for pneumonia as well, I guess lungworm would in theory affect most of group not individuals? Didn't really ascociate pneumonia with more than one but I suppose it is a strong possibility, cold nights,warm days. Put them in a field So pneumonia wouldn't be an issue:banghead:
     
    Friesianfan likes this.
  9. Devon lad

    Devon lad Member

    Location:
    Mid Devon
  10. Devon lad

    Devon lad Member

    Location:
    Mid Devon
    Any advice on pneumonia prevention?
     
  11. kill

    kill Member

    Location:
    South West
    If they are suffering badly with lung worm's the there's bound to be a higher risk of something secondary like pneumonia as the lungs are going to be weaker and young stock have far less resistance any how's. Lung worm's are associated with wet conditions and moist/ wet area's so feeding root's will probably not help as slugs and snails will still be very active due to this very warm winter we are having.
    Keep drenching while the risks are high as not every stage of a worms life span is killed with a singles dose.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2017
    Devon lad likes this.
  12. bovine

    bovine Member

    Location:
    North
    Ivermectin will last for up to 28 days, but there is no long term protection. Whilst we can see lungworm infection at any time, January would be unusual. It should present as a batch problem with multiple animals coughing, especially if they run about or you move them.

    Prevent pneumonia by vaccination. Ventilation important, but when foggy there is high humidity that favours bacterial and virus spread and survival. Extreme changes in temperature don't help.

    You can see lungworm in the trachea (=windpipe) like fine spaghetti - easy to cut open and look DIY.
     
    Devon lad likes this.
  13. buffalo_soldier

    Location:
    cumbria
    What do you think of using an injectable over a pour on or drench?
    It would lead to slower immunity gain would it not?
     
  14. Thick Farmer

    Thick Farmer Member

    Location:
    West Wales
    University of life. None of mine have died from worms.

    Thus, if you want to make sure they haven't got worms it's worth treating every 6 weeks as a bare minimum.
     
    Greenasgrass and S J H like this.
  15. bovine

    bovine Member

    Location:
    North
    There is no benefit other than operator convenience to route of administration.

    Immunity depends on exposure and time.
     
    Courier and buffalo_soldier like this.
  16. bovine

    bovine Member

    Location:
    North
    If you are using a wormer every 6 weeks then they will very soon when you develop resistance. Good research showing targeted selective treatment maintains growth and vastly reduces need to worm (worm based on faecal egg counts). You may own more cattle than me, but I am responsible for the parasite management for many thousands and none of them use a wormer every 6 weeks. Some of the guys who use us once a year for emergencies may be doing like you, I have no idea.

    You are the perfect example of why these medicines need to be prescription only. Look at the mess sheep farmers and SQPs have created with sheep worm resistance. Cattle worms will follow if you use drugs like you are. I expect you not to listen to me and carry on in your misguided way.
     
  17. I've got 140 on kale and 40 still on grass and there are a few coughing a bit but nothing severe, I think it's very unlikely to be lungworm.

    We're seeing pretty huge variations in temperature at the moment, it dropped to -6 last Tuesday yet tonight it's not forcast to drop below +10.

    Since outwintering I've never lost an animal to pneumonia so I don't think I could justify vaccinating but I do keep a bottle of terramycin L.A. and my medidart handy to treat anything that looked subdued straight away.
     
    Devon lad and bovine like this.
  18. buffalo_soldier

    Location:
    cumbria
    Im backwards with wormers this year thinking about it.

    Had to do the cows before service, now the vet is on about flukeing them.
    Whereas i haven't used anything in the hfrs all year:scratchhead:.
     
    Headless chicken likes this.
  19. More to life

    More to life Member

    Location:
    Somerset
    I've had two get it on rape/turnips this year, one last year they seem to come right quicker outside, alamycin la plus one jab of flanixin does the trick.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2017
    Devon lad and Cows 'n grass like this.
  20. We have just had a group of outwintered heifers go down with lungworm. They are on grass and bales, started coughing over new year. We have treated with ivormectin immediately and so far they are not getting worse.
     
    Thick Farmer likes this.

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