Milk recording and kpi’s

coomoo

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Scotland
Nearing the 4 year mark for running these cows. Milk recorded last week so hop in for a look, kpi’s look good but how relevant?
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101 milking so looking at both herd sizes.
 

Big_D

Member
Location
S W Scotland
Had never seen this feature before, just ran ours, quite interesting seeing how we compare. Your figures look good (y) maybe bit high replacement rate if I can be so cheeky to say ;)
 

WillM

Member
Location
Indonesia
id say you cull rate is about perfect.

The "better farms" with a lower cull rate probably treats twice as many cows for Mastitis, pen full of crock cows, doesn't make anymore money and boasts about his low cull rate and selling heifers.
 
I'd forget the figures for herds <100 cows.

If I am reading yours right, you have a lower age at 1st calving, you have a far lower calving interval and higher constituents? This is how you make milk which being easier on the cows, your milk yields are lower than the average but, crucially, you are getting the yield per year because your calving interval is much much shorter, meaning you are obtaining the missing bit of yield no one can quantify for you. What you are doing is far gentler on the cows and kinder because you aren't pushing maximum yield at the expense of fertility, which has obvious connotations towards cow health.

Now then, show us some real figures, what are your litres from forage and feed rate/litre?
 

coomoo

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Scotland
I'd forget the figures for herds <100 cows.

If I am reading yours right, you have a lower age at 1st calving, you have a far lower calving interval and higher constituents? This is how you make milk which being easier on the cows, your milk yields are lower than the average but, crucially, you are getting the yield per year because your calving interval is much much shorter, meaning you are obtaining the missing bit of yield no one can quantify for you. What you are doing is far gentler on the cows and kinder because you aren't pushing maximum yield at the expense of fertility, which has obvious connotations towards cow health.

Now then, show us some real figures, what are your litres from forage and feed rate/litre?
This is exactly why I need more technical intervention in the herd. As I say it’s fine going into look at figures but when it matters like feed rate/litre I would say we’re coming up short along with the feed companies/nutrition.
 
This is exactly why I need more technical intervention in the herd. As I say it’s fine going into look at figures but when it matters like feed rate/litre I would say we’re coming up short along with the feed companies/nutrition.

Consultant/vet/feed rep interaction. Any good feed rep should have software to tell you this kind of thing. The feed rate/litre is the acid test.

Basically take total kilos of concentrate fed one day and divide by told milk collected that day.

It is no good spending such a big chunk of your milk cheque every month with someone you don't see or value. You need to work with someone who brings value and technical insight, not just lorry loads of cake.
 

coomoo

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Scotland
Yeah I’m working on this....... again slightly annoyingly. Anyway last tests on 100 cows, m+25 8 kg blend and 1.5 kg molasses with 45 kg silage/ head tmr. Parlour feed to yield off top of head 3.5 kg 18%. cake. Would say over feeding for what we’re getting?
 
Yeah I’m working on this....... again slightly annoyingly. Anyway last tests on 100 cows, m+25 8 kg blend and 1.5 kg molasses with 45 kg silage/ head tmr. Parlour feed to yield off top of head 3.5 kg 18%. cake. Would say over feeding for what we’re getting?

Cripes it was years since I did all this, someone fresher will be along to sort the details.

You need to know total concentrate use per day and then total milk yield, any day will do, to give average feed rate per litre.

If I have worked it out right your feed rate is about 0.23/litre which from memory is fairly normal.
 

Big_D

Member
Location
S W Scotland
Cripes it was years since I did all this, someone fresher will be along to sort the details.

You need to know total concentrate use per day and then total milk yield, any day will do, to give average feed rate per litre.

If I have worked it out right your feed rate is about 0.23/litre which from memory is fairly normal.
0.23 would be very very low, you haven't taken into account he's eodc though so it's actually 0.46-0.48 which is on the high side, we also have too high a feed rate here so not having a go!
 

coomoo

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Scotland
0.23 would be very very low, you haven't taken into account he's eodc though so it's actually 0.46-0.48 which is on the high side, we also have too high a feed rate here so not having a go!
Put it this way worked with a more independent nutrition company earlier in year, were to expensive in my mind but blend was at 4 kg. Milk litres were well up but quality well down same old same
 
0.23 would be very very low, you haven't taken into account he's eodc though so it's actually 0.46-0.48 which is on the high side, we also have too high a feed rate here so not having a go!

Ah, I didn't spot the EOD collection!

I was hoping the respective figures would be put up so I wouldn't make the mistake of sourcing them myself.

That being the case, is he actually feeding for M + 25??
 

O'Reilly

Member
In rough figures, 1kg of conc. will give you 2litres milk. You're feeding approx. 13kg if I read correctly, so all your milk is coming from concentrates. I have no idea what your silage is like, but even ordinary silage should give you maintenance plus ten litres, and fifteen isn't that out of the way. Of course, we're going on estimates and so on, so the first thing is to keep records of feed used, then do the sums, and by the sound of it, find a better nutritionist. Is this one attached to the people selling you the feed?
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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