Moles!

Daniel

Member
I wouldn't have that done here but why does there need to be an outcry?

Moles are pests which need controlling, the best way of doing that is with lethal traps, the mole catcher leaves the ones he's caught as proof of his work to the landowner, clearly this catcher was good at his job. Why must everything be sanitised to suit the needs of townies and bunny huggers at the RSPCA?!
 

Jackson4

Member
Location
Wensleydale
Ignorance. I do wonder though why they bother hanging them up on the fences anymore? I suppose so they farmer will see them before any get taken by local carnivores?
When we got mole catchers they set the traps one day, turned up another and said?? heres 300 moles, give me a grand (or something like) and we would stick them in a bag and bury them/ maybe put in waste bin:unsure: Yet, you can go round the roadsides and the old molecatchers pee about hanging them on the fence were the lazy farmer will leave them till the backbone gives way 5 years later. When i catch a mole it goes into the grave it dug for itself.
 

Giles1

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Central Scotland
Remember as a callow yoof in the early 70's riding around on horseback in Wiltshire seeing moles,weasels and stoats sharing the fenceline like that,hundreds of them.Didn't bother me then,doesn't now.Plenty of all of them in this part of the world.If the practice had been kept up,it wouldn't shock so much,but this is a modern world and some folk don't like hanging, quartering and drawing any more either......
 

In conversation with a soil health pioneer

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In conversation with a soil health pioneer

Written by Janet Hughes



https://www.buzzsprout.com/1657363/8311877-janet-hughes-and-gabe-brown-the-six-principles-of-soil-health.mp3

In this month's Future Farming podcast, Janet Hughes talks to Gabe Brown.

Gabe has been named one of the twenty-five most influential agricultural leaders in the United States. He farms at...
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