New Zealand begins genetic program to produce low methane-emitting sheep

The Guardian RSS

New Member


New Zealand begins genetic program to produce low methane-emitting sheep

Written by Ben Smee

‘Global first’ project will help tackle climate change by lowering agricultural greenhouse gases

The New Zealand livestock industry has begun a “global first” genetic program that would help to tackle climate change by breeding low methane-emitting sheep.

There are about six sheep for each person in New Zealand, and the livestock industry accounts for about one-third of the country’s total greenhouse gas emissions.

Related: GM could help cut livestock methane emissions, say scientists

Continue reading...

Since you’re here …

… we have a small favour to ask. More people are reading the Guardian than ever but advertising revenues across the media are falling fast. And unlike many news organisations, we haven’t put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as open as we can. So you can see why we need to ask for your help. The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism takes a lot of time, money and hard work to produce. But we do it because we believe our perspective matters – because it might well be your perspective, too.

If everyone who reads our reporting, who likes it, helps fund it, our future would be much more secure. Support the Guardian – it only takes a minute. Thank you.

 
I thought the whole methane relative to climate change argument has been well and truely buggered, as long as stock numbers are constant then the net effect is nil unlike the use of hydrocarbons which is cumulative.
What's the next alleged environmental problem that they are going to try and use for wealth redistribution??
 

kiwi pom

Member
Location
canterbury NZ
I thought the whole methane relative to climate change argument has been well and truely buggered, as long as stock numbers are constant then the net effect is nil unlike the use of hydrocarbons which is cumulative.
What's the next alleged environmental problem that they are going to try and use for wealth redistribution??
If you could reduce it and keep stock numbers the same in would be a good thing though wouldn't it?
Governments only think on a country basis and at the minute there are those in the NZ government that are I'm sure thinking. If we reduce stock numbers our emissions will look great and as we are mainly an exporter we'll still have enough food for our own citizens.
In other words, make it someone else's problem.
They've paid no consideration to the $'s our exports bring in but we'll look green.
 
Breeding for lower methane emissions will only work for farmers if they can quantify it through the BVs of the rams they use and include that into their individual farm GHG profile. If the Gov't is only interested in industry averages, no farmer will invest in such genetics.
Fortunately its moderately heritable, flock gains of 1% pa can be made without compromising other traits as there is no negative correlations to productivity.
There are less ruminants on earth now as there was prior to 1800 when humans hit their first one billion. Now we gained another billion people in just 13 years.......and we are worrying about ruminant emissions???
 
Breeding for lower methane emissions will only work for farmers if they can quantify it through the BVs of the rams they use and include that into their individual farm GHG profile. If the Gov't is only interested in industry averages, no farmer will invest in such genetics.
Fortunately its moderately heritable, flock gains of 1% pa can be made without compromising other traits as there is no negative correlations to productivity.
There are less ruminants on earth now as there was prior to 1800 when humans hit their first one billion. Now we gained another billion people in just 13 years.......and we are worrying about ruminant emissions???
Are by chance suggesting that your government is "book cooking" for appearances and even if you could breed ruminant livestock for the desired effect that it would have minimal or nil effect on climate change??
 
If you could reduce it and keep stock numbers the same in would be a good thing though wouldn't it?
Governments only think on a country basis and at the minute there are those in the NZ government that are I'm sure thinking. If we reduce stock numbers our emissions will look great and as we are mainly an exporter we'll still have enough food for our own citizens.
In other words, make it someone else's problem.
They've paid no consideration to the $'s our exports bring in but we'll look green.
Image means nothing or at best just a perception. Given that New Zealand is a country dependent on exports any government that cripples the productive sector unduely must fear some form of retaliation at some point in time?
I'd suggest it would be foolish to rely on just forestry and tourism should there be a major economic downturn in the short to medium term.
 
Are by chance suggesting that your government is "book cooking" for appearances and even if you could breed ruminant livestock for the desired effect that it would have minimal or nil effect on climate change??
We in NZ have a Gov't that is very influenced by ideologues who are more interested in perception than sound science and economics. Many of these ideologues ignore the clause in the Paris Agreement that emission mitigation must not interrupt food production.
 
Anton Coaker's "Broken record" piece under Agricultural Matters really puts the foolish beliefs of the tree brigade so clearly.
How would he implement the last paragraph, supply management?
Or if the UK was going to go 100% self sufficient by banning all imported food and or paying the full ,true price for UK produce?
Either way I hope they are as quick as the Brexit exit, eh?
 

Forum statistics

Threads
180,949
Messages
4,119,921
Members
45,388
Latest member
David J M

How to mitigate heat stress in cattle

  • 15
  • 0


Written by John Swire

With temperatures forecast to rise above 25°C, cattle producers should be prepared to mitigate the negative effects of heat stress on their beef and dairy animals.

“Cattle are fairly comfortable when the ambient temperature is between 15°C and 25°C over the summer months but if the thermometer rises significantly, production performance will start to suffer,” warns Jacob Lakin from Azelis Animal Nutrition.

“This is because both a milk production and growing beef animal will start to divert energy away from production performance towards keeping cool. You’ll notice if a cow is struggling during a summer heatwave because she will start to salivate heavily and pant...
Top